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The Fall of Gondolin av J.R.R. Tolkien
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The Fall of Gondolin (utgåvan 2018)

av J.R.R. Tolkien (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
8441218,852 (4.2)15
In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Tuor and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was 'the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days.… (mer)
Medlem:GT
Titel:The Fall of Gondolin
Författare:J.R.R. Tolkien (Författare)
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2018), Edition: First Edition, 304 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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The Fall of Gondolin av J. R. R. Tolkien

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» Se även 15 omnämnanden

engelska (11)  italienska (1)  Alla språk (12)
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Love this stuff!!! really enjoyed the breakdown on the various versions of the story and how he shared it all in one place. Such an important part of the backdrop of Middle-Earth ( )
  aldimartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
Love this stuff!!! really enjoyed the breakdown on the various versions of the story and how he shared it all in one place. Such an important part of the backdrop of Middle-Earth ( )
  Andy_DiMartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
Classic J R R Tolkein. Although it was great to read all the versions that he wrote, I would have appreciated a more concise version. ( )
  KarenCollyer | Oct 26, 2020 |
Like Beren and Luthien and The Children of Hurin and a few of the other recent releases (though this is THE last according to Christopher Tolkien) .... I always feel bad about giving it 3 stars rather than 4, where it could/should probably be, but just can't do it.

Sadly, this is in the same vein. Its barely enough material to meet out a novella, but is then re-told 3 times, and with a ton of add-ons, behind the scenes, and all kinds of things, that by the end unless you're a massive Tolkien and Middle-Earth fan it all becomes jumbled in your head, especially due to some characters having two names (three in some cases) and locations having two names, events happening similar but with slightly different changes or different people involved, etc.

Usually I can keep universes in tact in my mind, many universes at once even (Star Wars, 40K, the main arc canon of Middle-Earth, A Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones {I count them as two unique}, Stover's works, Stackpole's works, Lynch's works, and so many other fantasy and elsewise universes), but the... smaller, lesser, far-back-in-history, archaic stories of Middle-Earth, like this, Children of Hurin, even Silmarillion, etc, I have trouble keeping all in place in my mind.

And I think its kind of because of publications like this. The story of the Fall of Gondolin is about 90 pages, roughly. (Not going back to check on it). It's then re-told. And re-told in smaller portions/pieces another three times roughly. This is all intercut with descriptions, explanations, behind the scenes information, language explanations, etc, by Christopher Tolkien.

The main story itself is wonderfully written, though cuts off (obviously), and starts up with little exposition (again, obvious reasons why). Its a tragic moment in the history of Middle-Earth and the story and telling behind it is done very well as only Tolkien can do.

I think either sadly, I'm not as huge a fan of Middle-Earth/Tolkien as I was in high school, or due to my much larger reading history, getting piece-meal story with lots of behind the scenes, isn't the excitement it was when I first started to see Chris Tolkien releasing JRR's works when I was younger. Too much to keep juggled and up in the air in my head perhaps that reading the same story 3 times with different spellings of key names/places/battles doesn't hold the same excitement as it used to; or the same interest perhaps.

I'm still glad these books and works were released. Don't get me wrong about that. And I definitely know there is a huge market and a huge fan base ready and willing to read all of these (as am I to be honest, just perhaps with after-effect not as much taken out of it as I used to/as most will get out of this work). I think all of the explanations, expositions, behind the scenes, is also tremendous, and a great service Chris is doing to his father's honor and legacy.

Perhaps this is just me merely wishing I got as much out of this as I know most/many will, or maybe wishing for the time when I enjoyed fantasy and Middle-Earth far more than I do now; or perhaps my time is far more limited, so reading the same story three times feels more time-consuming than when I was in high school and time was endless. ( )
  BenKline | Jul 1, 2020 |
Fans of Tolkien and his Silmarillion will not be too disappointed in this book. It's not as recursive as Beren and Luthien and the strong descriptions of Gondolin's destruction are really quite fun.

I mean, who DOESN'T love balrogs and hosts of orcs descending upon and destroying the hidden city of elves in a grand bloody rout? Sure, there's mighty good sendoff and defense, but what we really wanted to see is all those stupid kinslaying elves get theirs.

Hmmm. I might be a bit bloodthirsty today. :) Rah, rah, Melkor?

My only complaint is not directed at Christopher but at J.R.R.

I really wanted not Tuon's story, although it was rather epic, but his son's story: Earendil, with the Silmaril on his brow. Am I asking too much? The way the later victors lose or use the recovered Silmarils? All of that stuff is more interesting to me than how the god of the waters set the first King of Men on a quest. :)

Still. Despite the repeats that show up in other books, I did have a good time with a lot more detail in certain areas. Only by reading ALL of them do we get the idea that big detailed tellings are portioned out for different areas despite getting a good feel in the primary publications. And I mean the Silmarillion. If you like the primary and always wanted to see the tales stretched out and also analyzed, then this is definitely for you.

I'm happy to have read it, although I am filled with a sense of loss. I wish Tolkien was back among us, getting not just credit, but support for more stories. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
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The story follows one of the Noldor, Tuor, who sets out to find Gondolin; during his journey, he experiences what the publisher described as "one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth": when Ulmo, the sea-god, rises out of the ocean during a storm.

When Tuor arrives in Gondolin, he becomes a great man and the father of Eärendel, an important character in Tolkien's The Silmarillion. But Morgoth attacks, with Balrogs, dragons and orcs, and as the city falls, Tuor, his wife Idril and the child Eärendel escape, "looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city".

"They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources," said HarperCollins.

[John] Garth said The Fall of Gondolin contains Tolkien's "biggest battle narrative outside of The Lord of the Rings", but he predicted the "capstone" of the book would be the "exquisite" piece of writing in which Tolkien attempted to tell the whole story again, in the novelistic style of The Lord of the Rings. "In the first (finished version) of the story, you feel like you’re reading The Iliad," he said. "This one (which is unfinished), is more naturalistic."

According to HarperCollins, Tolkien saw The Fall of Gondolin as one of his three "great tales" of the Elder Days, along with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin. The latter title was also a bestseller, after Christopher Tolkien completed the text left behind by his father and published it in 2007.

[Several below-the-line comments on the review point out that Tuor was not one of the Noldor, but a mortal man].
tillagd av Cynfelyn | ändraThe Guardian, Alison Flood (Apr 10, 2018)
 

» Lägg till fler författare

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Tolkien, J. R. R.primär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Lee, AlanIllustrator, cover artistmedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Tolkien, ChristopherRedaktörmedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Pesch, Helmut W.Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Tuor and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was 'the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days.

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