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Jonathan Elphick

Författare till RSPB Pocket Birds

66+ verk 667 medlemmar 6 recensioner

Om författaren

Jonathan Elphick, FZS, FLS, is a wildlife writer, editor, consultant, lecturer and broadcaster, specializing in ornithology. During a career spanning almost 40 years, he has written many books including The World of Birds and the award-winning Birdwatcher's Handbook. He was researcher for Birds visa mer People, the largest survey of cultural attitudes to birds worldwide, and spent five years as researcher on the acclaimed bestseller Birds Britannica. He lives in Exeter, UK. visa färre
Foto taget av: Ornithologist Jonathan Elphick photographed at Boquer Valley, Mallorca

Serier

Verk av Jonathan Elphick

RSPB Pocket Birds (2003) — Författare — 132 exemplar
Birds: The Art of Ornithology (2008) 104 exemplar
Mammal (2003) 27 exemplar
The World of Birds (2014) 24 exemplar
Family of Toucans (2011) 7 exemplar
Linnut (2005) 1 exemplar
Encyklopedie živočichů (2001) 1 exemplar
Birdsong 1 exemplar

Associerade verk

Encyclopedia of Animals (2000) 463 exemplar
Natural History of the Ussr (1987) — Redaktör — 60 exemplar

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Medlemmar

Recensioner

This is a truly beautiful book. The art is all beautiful and the short biographies of the artists just leave you wanting more.The only thing missing was a little more information on the birds themselves, but that was not the purpose of this book, so might as well say, it’s perfect
 
Flaggad
cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
As HadleyAdkins wrote, this book is beautifully laid out and concisely written in a way that is quite hard to do. Almost every photo is striking and memorable. For example, the front cover features an elegantly bounding puma, while the temptation might be to throw a mélange of different mammals on there. I like the inclusion of most of the most dramatically-horned antelopes / deer / goats of the world. The teeth of the yawning mandrill on pg. 58 are quite astonishing. The only non-photo illustrations are of extinct animals.… (mer)
 
Flaggad
YESterNOw | 1 annan recension | Sep 28, 2017 |
I love this book. I love everything about it. The organization is excellent, the photographs, the content, everything. The book is organizes mammals by content and then additionally the habitats in which they are found on that particular content (there is also an ocean and seas section). The introduction is fantastic, taking care to define what a mammal is, herbivores, omnivores, carnivores, evolution, classification, and the role of man with other mammals. Each section begins with an overview of the particular continent and the habitats found there. The book then details the mammals found in each habitat and their unique characteristics.

I would absolutely have this book in my classroom. It shows students the wide diversity of creatures on this planet and it only delves into mammals. Additionally, it is a great resource for students to get ideas about new-to-them animals to research in further depth.
… (mer)
 
Flaggad
HadleyAdkins | 1 annan recension | Apr 30, 2015 |
As I write this there is a female Great Spotted Woodpecker on the bird feeder, hammering away at the fat balls. I don’t hear it early morning now as it taps the bark on the dying Scots pine outside – maybe there’s no live food available, or maybe I’m not waking early enough – but it’s got bolder and no longer flies away in fright when we appear at the window, as the occasional shy jay does. The woodpecker is a sight to swell the heart, with its striking pied plumage and the bold splash of red under its tail clearly visible as it feeds.

As it’s winter now, with the first appearances of sleet and snow, it’s vital to keep the feeders replenished, with mixed seed and fat balls. The fat balls are loved not just by the woodpecker but also by the odd starling, and particularly by the various tits – Great, Blue, Coal and even the occasional Long-tailed or Willow Tit – which cluster greedily on them. Irritatingly, some of the tits, especially the Coal Tits, go for the seed feeder, seeking out the black sunflower seeds and spitting out the other seeds to carpet the ground. That’s great for the ground feeders such as solitary robins and thrushes and the cowardly magpies, but it’s a messy sight and we worry about it attracting vermin – rats, grey squirrels and so on.

Of the other common birds attracted by the never-ending feast we regularly see sparrows (who, hereabouts don’t seem to have realised that their species is in decline) and finches (especially chaffinches). There are often over ten birds on the feeders, with almost that number waiting their turn in nearby branches, such as on the small oak that sits potted up on the decking. Blackbirds hop around or flit from beech hedge to buddleia, the males asserting territorial dominance and ownership of the bashful female lurking quietly in the shadows.

We catch glimpses of other avians in the sky, some gliding around such as the ubiquitous buzzards and the occasional Red Kite, some passing overhead like the pair of ravens announcing their presence by a distinctive ‘cronk’ or, in season, the Canada geese who visit a neighbour’s lake and take a morning or evening turn in their pairs, calling exultantly to each other. High up we often see gulls wheeling or returning to the sea, and once we were lucky to see a flock of lapwings alight in a nearby field en route from or to somewhere exotic.

If it wasn’t for the various mini-guides we wouldn’t know even half the species that fly around our neck of the woods. The RSPB Pocket Birds guide is our usual first port of call, with its wealth of concise information, photos and distribution maps contained in half-page or full-page entries, though we supplement that with the Collins Complete British Birds photo guide, where the photos are in a little more detail. Every day, whether it’s grey and misty or less frequently sunny, when we go for a constitutional or just stare out the windows, we wonderingly repeat the mantra “We’re so lucky!” Thanks to guides like these we can appreciate just how lucky we are.

http://calmgrove.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/birds/
… (mer)
1 rösta
Flaggad
ed.pendragon | Jan 17, 2013 |

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Statistik

Verk
66
Även av
2
Medlemmar
667
Popularitet
#37,822
Betyg
4.0
Recensioner
6
ISBN
61
Språk
7

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