Författarbild

Benjamin R. Foster

Författare till The Epic of Gilgamesh (Norton Critical Editions)

14+ verk 741 medlemmar 6 recensioner

Om författaren

Benjamin R. Foster is Professor of Assyriology at Yale University, USA.

Verk av Benjamin R. Foster

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Taggad

Allmänna fakta

Vedertaget namn
Foster, Benjamin R.
Kön
male
Land (för karta)
United States of America

Medlemmar

Recensioner

Knowing the mythological corpus of Akkad only briefly and supporting myself with historical volumes of Cambridge Ancient History altogether with some text on Babylonian-Assyrian astrology, I found it a pure treasury of ancient theology, which by and large may be derived from this tome. I've made some retro-active attempts at reconstructing certain magical techniques (later Hellenic bionic statues, in which spirits were scried into a statue), magickal blockades and all forms of spells and incantantations that had a well thought-over syntax of work. The charming scenario of Gods-as-friends to humanity in which the Great Lords are summoned even to help at childbirth, in which poor Ereshkigal moans over Nergal, while Erra-Nergal wreaks bloodthirsty destruction upon the land. A great stasis is threading behind all of those magnificent stories, both of astronomical, astrological, and cosmogenic proportions, a great stasis in which stories about Gods and forces at work are thin and blurry. All aspects of life were covered in myth, all consolation is found therein. All theology is interpretation, some is phantasy, what works has a grain of truth in it. Forewarned by Julian in his Hymn to Helios, that myths are for toothing children, it was to look beyond the fabric of words to peer into the cosmic events that in the eternal return of the sanctified narration are granting something new forever more. I have abolished many misconceptions, for example that mortals could no join Gods and they were condemned to the netherworlds by and large. It seems that there were ways of growing wings post-mortem and joining the mighty lot. With landscape populated with hungry ghosts, phantoms, cacodaimons and spirits, with mighty sorcerers and witches there was woe and extreme suffering, yet there were also remedies, joys and a great 'yes' to life. People of Mesopotamia had no issue with trafficking with Gods, spirits, yet constituting one of the greatest civilization(s) ever, building great libraries and rallying armies to destroy disobedient foes. Who knows, maybe Sun-Disked Igigi revealing themselves to you one day will embrace your mortal toil, so that you may taste the plums of the Tree of Life.… (mer)
 
Flaggad
Saturnin.Ksawery | 2 andra recensioner | Jan 12, 2024 |
Knowing the mythological corpus of Akkad only briefly and supporting myself with historical volumes of Cambridge Ancient History altogether with some text on Babylonian-Assyrian astrology, I found it a pure treasury of ancient theology, which by and large may be derived from this tome. I've made some retro-active attempts at reconstructing certain magical techniques (later Hellenic bionic statues, in which spirits were scried into a statue), magickal blockades and all forms of spells and incantantations that had a well thought-over syntax of work. The charming scenario of Gods-as-friends to humanity in which the Great Lords are summoned even to help at childbirth, in which poor Ereshkigal moans over Nergal, while Erra-Nergal wreaks bloodthirsty destruction upon the land. A great stasis is threading behind all of those magnificent stories, both of astronomical, astrological, and cosmogenic proportions, a great stasis in which stories about Gods and forces at work are thin and blurry. All aspects of life were covered in myth, all consolation is found therein. All theology is interpretation, some is phantasy, what works has a grain of truth in it. Forewarned by Julian in his Hymn to Helios, that myths are for toothing children, it was to look beyond the fabric of words to peer into the cosmic events that in the eternal return of the sanctified narration are granting something new forever more. I have abolished many misconceptions, for example that mortals could no join Gods and they were condemned to the netherworlds by and large. It seems that there were ways of growing wings post-mortem and joining the mighty lot. With landscape populated with hungry ghosts, phantoms, cacodaimons and spirits, with mighty sorcerers and witches there was woe and extreme suffering, yet there were also remedies, joys and a great 'yes' to life. People of Mesopotamia had no issue with trafficking with Gods, spirits, yet constituting one of the greatest civilization(s) ever, building great libraries and rallying armies to destroy disobedient foes. Who knows, maybe Sun-Disked Igigi revealing themselves to you one day will embrace your mortal toil, so that you may taste the plums of the Tree of Life.… (mer)
 
Flaggad
SaturninCorax | 2 andra recensioner | Sep 27, 2021 |
Knowing the mythological corpus of Akkad only briefly and supporting myself with historical volumes of Cambridge Ancient History altogether with some text on Babylonian-Assyrian astrology, I found it a pure treasury of ancient theology, which by and large may be derived from this tome. I've made some retro-active attempts at reconstructing certain magical techniques (later Hellenic bionic statues, in which spirits were scried into a statue), magickal blockades and all forms of spells and incantantations that had a well thought-over syntax of work. The charming scenario of Gods-as-friends to humanity in which the Great Lords are summoned even to help at childbirth, in which poor Ereshkigal moans over Nergal, while Erra-Nergal wreaks bloodthirsty destruction upon the land. A great stasis is threading behind all of those magnificent stories, both of astronomical, astrological, and cosmogenic proportions, a great stasis in which stories about Gods and forces at work are thin and blurry. All aspects of life were covered in myth, all consolation is found therein. All theology is interpretation, some is phantasy, what works has a grain of truth in it. Forewarned by Julian in his Hymn to Helios, that myths are for toothing children, it was to look beyond the fabric of words to peer into the cosmic events that in the eternal return of the sanctified narration are granting something new forever more. I have abolished many misconceptions, for example that mortals could no join Gods and they were condemned to the netherworlds by and large. It seems that there were ways of growing wings post-mortem and joining the mighty lot. With landscape populated with hungry ghosts, phantoms, cacodaimons and spirits, with mighty sorcerers and witches there was woe and extreme suffering, yet there were also remedies, joys and a great 'yes' to life. People of Mesopotamia had no issue with trafficking with Gods, spirits, yet constituting one of the greatest civilization(s) ever, building great libraries and rallying armies to destroy disobedient foes. Who knows, maybe Sun-Disked Igigi revealing themselves to you one day will embrace your mortal toil, so that you may taste the plums of the Tree of Life.… (mer)
 
Flaggad
vucjipastir | 2 andra recensioner | Jun 7, 2020 |
The Epic of Gilgamesh is the worlds oldest epic recorded. Gilgamesh is part God and part man. He is so strong, so handsome, and so grand that he is frustrated with normal life. He uses his power for selfish gain. He mistreats his people. The Gods see this and they decide that he needs someone to balance him. They create Enkidu from the clay. He is the opposite of Gilgamesh. He lives like a wild animal.
Eventually Enkidu is introduced to Gilgamesh, by a crafty prostitute, and they become fast friends. Enkidu helps Gilgamesh focus his strengths for better purposes.
The Epic of Gilgamesh has themes that are still popular today. Friendship, the search for eternal life, the consequences of selfishness and violence.
I thoroughly enjoyed this epic! There was a lot of beautiful imagery, laugh out loud comparisons and characters, and a wonderful message.
I find it fascinating that this epic was written over 4000 years ago in a culture that no longer exists, yet still speaks and applies to readers today.
I think The Epic of Gilgamesh needs to be more widely read. I think someone should take on the task of retelling the story and make it into a YA novel. (Don't hate me highly educated literature readers.)
… (mer)
 
Flaggad
mollypitchermary | Oct 11, 2017 |

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Statistik

Verk
14
Även av
4
Medlemmar
741
Popularitet
#34,276
Betyg
4.1
Recensioner
6
ISBN
23
Språk
1

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