Museums about books/authors

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Museums about books/authors

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1rfb
sep 11, 2006, 11:32am

Who has ever been to a museum dedicated only to books? Which museum was that?

Quite exactly some five years ago I visited the small town of Lübeck in the north of Germany. There, in the former house of Thomas Mann's grandparents, a museum about his most famous book (or at least one of them), the Buddenbrooks, had been installed. It has become my favourite museum ever since; I've been there at least five times, and I would always go again!
(http://www.buddenbrookhaus.de/)

Also, I've very much enjoyed the Kafka-Museum in Prague, which had earlier been presented as an exhibition in Barcelona and New York.
(http://www.kafkamuseum.cz/)

Which other museums do you know? Would it be possible to mark the location of museums dedicated to books on a map and link it to this forum?

2A_musing
sep 12, 2006, 11:17pm

Massachusetts is incredibly rich in book related museums. There is the House of the Seven Gables in Salem, Massachusetts, the Eric Carle Museum and the Emily Dickinson House and Museum in Amherst, MA, Melville's home in the Berkshire, Orchard House in Concord, MA, where Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women, and the Longfellow House in Cambridge. That doesn't even get to the Athaeneum in Boston, the Boston Public Library, the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, or the Universities and Museums (there's almost always a Dr. Seuss exhibit somewhere in Springfield). There is a New England Literary Trail, but it's still pretty incomplete.

Prince Edward Island and Chincoteague have each made a minor industry out of Anne of Green Gables and Misty of Chincoteague, and each are places I remember fondly as a kid!

3A_musing
sep 13, 2006, 9:41am

By the way, the Buddenbrooks Museum looks pretty cool - it also looks like there is a Gunter Grass House linked to the web site. Of the Massachusetts locations, I'd particularly recommend the Eric Carle Museum, Orchard House, and the Athaneum and Boston Public Library (which has tremendous exhibits and special collections).

4ipsographic
sep 13, 2006, 7:11pm

Hannibal, Missouri has the boyhood home of Mark Twain, http://www.marktwainmuseum.org/. I've never been there, but I've heard that the town has living-history-type guided tours and attractions in the summertime.

5lilithcat
dec 19, 2006, 10:23pm

While not dedicated only to books, the Rosenbach Museum and Library is certainly primarily so dedicated. It's a wonderful place.

6Jargoneer
dec 20, 2006, 4:59am

The Writers' Museum in Edinburgh worth a quick visit, as is The Scott Monument (it's on the same link so no need to link again).

So is the Bronte Museum.

7bookishbunny
dec 20, 2006, 9:42am

The Henry Miller Memorial Library in Big Sur. I was in my early teens and was rather confused about the relationship between Henry and Anais Nin since June was his wife. In retrospect, I found it strange that my mother took me there at all, considering her 'conservative' outlook on relationships between men and women. I'd like to go again now that I'm a 'grown-up'.

8A_musing
dec 22, 2006, 1:57pm

Here's a few more: The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC - even though it is formally a library, it is at heart an incredible museum; then there is the National Yiddish Book Center and the Amherst Center for Russian Culture, each in Amherst, MA (the first at Hampshire College, along with the Eric Carle Museum, the second at Amherst College).

9papyri
Redigerat: okt 26, 2007, 11:03pm

The British Library recently (27 April–23 September 2007) presenting Sacred, an exhibition featuring some of the world's greatest and most exquisite Jewish, Christian and Muslim holy books.

Images of some of the manuscripts in this exhibit are presented on-line.

http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/features/sacred/homepage.html

There are several catalogs and books related to the Exhibit

Sacred Catalogue, People of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, Islam is the official exhibition catalog Edited by John Reeve

The Voice, The Word, The Books The Sacred Scripture of the Jews, Christians and Muslims by F. E. Peters

Hebrew manuscripts by Ilana Tahan

Bible Manuscripts by Scot McKendrick and Kathleen Doyle

Quran Manuscripts, Calligraphy, Illumination, Design by Colin F. Baker