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The Collected Essays and Criticism, Volume…
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The Collected Essays and Criticism, Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance, 1957-1969 (The Collected Essays and Criticism , Vol 4) (v. 4) (utgåvan 1995)

av Clement Greenberg (Författare), John O'Brian (Redaktör)

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462554,652 (4.67)Ingen/inga
Clement Greenberg is widely recognized as the most influential and articulate champion of modernism during its American ascendency after World War II, the period largely covered by these highly acclaimed volumes of The Collected Essays and Criticism. Volume 3: Affirmations and Refusals presents Greenberg's writings from the period between 1950 and 1956, while Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance gathers essays and criticism of the years 1957 to 1969. The 120 works range from little-known pieces originally appearing Vogue and Harper's Bazaar to such celebrated essays as "The Plight of Our Culture" (1953), "Modernist Painting" (1960), and "Post Painterly Abstraction" (1964). Preserved in their original form, these writings allow readers to witness the development and direction of Greenberg's criticism, from his advocacy of abstract expressionism to his enthusiasm for color-field painting. With the inclusion of critical exchanges between Greenberg and F. R. Leavis, Fairfield Porter, Thomas B. Hess, Herbert Read, Max Kozloff, and Robert Goldwater, these volumes are essential sources in the ongoing debate over modern art. For each volume, John O'Brian has furnished an introduction, a selected bibliography, and a brief summary of events that places the criticism in its artistic and historical context.… (mer)
Medlem:margaretfield
Titel:The Collected Essays and Criticism, Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance, 1957-1969 (The Collected Essays and Criticism , Vol 4) (v. 4)
Författare:Clement Greenberg (Författare)
Andra författare:John O'Brian (Redaktör)
Info:University of Chicago Press (1995), 358 pages
Samlingar:Want To
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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The Collected Essays and Criticism, Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance, 1957-1969 av Clement Greenberg

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The most influential voice of modernism in the art world for twenty-five years following World War II, particularly in the United States, art critic, cultural philosopher, aesthetician Clement Greenberg was a force to be reckoned with, a man who never held back in asserting his sharp, compelling well-formulated opinions, particularly on topics touching modern art. This collection entitled “Modernism with a Vengeance” contains over sixty entries – essays, reviews, letters, interviews – taken from the years 1957-1969, each and every piece providing anyone interested in art and culture with much to ponder. To whet a reader’s artistic palate, here are quotes along with my comments on two essays I found especially provocative:

The Case for Abstract Art
“Many people say that the kind of art our age produces is one of the major symptoms of what’s wrong with the age. The disintegration and, finally, the disappearance of recognizable images in painting and sculpture, like the obscurity in advanced literature, are supposed to reflect a disintegration of values in society itself.” --------- Of course Greenberg is alluding to nonrepresentational, abstract art of painters like Pollock and Mondrian and people who find such art to be not only degenerate but downright crazy or sick or even silly. The author counters in several ways, including how modern art has been under constant attack ever since the time of the Impressionists. When I myself hear modern art attacked in this way, I keep in mind how Hitler and the Nazis organized their infamous 1937 ‘Degenerate Art’ exhibit, where artists such as Chagall, Grosz, Kandinsky, Klee, Marc and Nolde were put on display for public ridicule.

“I think a poor life is lived by anyone who doesn’t regularly take time out to stand and gaze, or sit and listen, or touch, or smell, or brood, without any further end in mind, simply for the satisfaction gotten from that which is gazed at, listened to, touched, smelled, or brooded upon.” ---------- Greenberg spent a significant part of his life, an hour or two or three every day, standing and gazing at art. He simply could not tolerate people passing judgment on paintings who refused to make a serious commitment to visit museums and galleries. Sidebar: One insightful Greenberg observation: when listening to music or reading literature one is always, on some level, anticipating the next musical phrase or the next page in the book; with abstract art, there is no ‘next’, it is all right there, a viewer has to stick with it, gazing deeper and deeper. Personal note: I think all art, particularly abstract art, suffers from reproductions in books and magazines, that is, many people will judge a six foot canvas by a six inch photo.

The Identity of Art
“In the long run there are only two kinds of art: the good and the bad. This difference cuts across all other differences in art.” ---------- Reminds me of Eduardo Galeano recounting a story about communist intellectuals pressing a Brazilian artist for a definition of art. His reply, “All I know is this: art is art, or it’s shit.” When we think of a painter of portraits we frequently think of an artist like Rembrandt or Vermeer, but recall how the vast majority of portraits during the 16th and 17th and 18th centuries were painted by mediocre artists commissioned by nobility or the wealthy, commissioned not so much for love of art but for that love that never fades - love of self.

"The error made by too many partisans of non-decorative abstract art is to think that the kind of experience they get from it is different from the kind of experience they get from representational art – to think, in fact, that it is an utterly new kind of experience.” ---------- Nihil sub sole novum. True, each painting or sculpture gives us a unique portal into the realm of the aesthetic, but aesthetic experience is aesthetic experience, as every philosopher of art has known since Alexander Baumgarten in the eighteenth century, the first philosopher to categorize experience as aesthetic.

“One cannot validly be for or against any particular body of art in toto. One can only be for good or superior art as against bad or inferior art. One is not for Chinese, or Western, or representational art as a whole, but only for what is good in it.” ---------- Greenberg encourages us to hone our ability to ‘see’ by the following exercise: pick an artist you really enjoy. Look carefully at a number of that artist’s painting, if possible the originals, not copies. Determine which paintings especially resonate with you and which other paintings do not. Then carefully assess and evaluate what has caused the difference.

“Quality in art can be neither ascertained nor proved by logic or discourse. Experience alone rules in this area – and the experience, so to speak, of experience.” ---------- Again, to come to know an artist and his or her painting, we have to use our eyes.; not reading, not discussing, not putting the painting into words, but looking very carefully as painting is ultimately a visual, sensual experience.

“Too many people simply refuse to make the effort of humility – as well as of patience – that is required to learn how to experience, or appreciate, art relevantly. Such people do not have the right to pronounce on any kind of art – much less about abstract art. Left to themselves, they would not be able to tell the difference in quality between a calendar picture by Petty and a nude by Rubens. ---------- Thanks, Clement! That’s the way to tell it like it is. The bottom line – to appreciate the visual arts takes a serious commitment.

If this review has piqued an interest to watch Clement Greenberg in action in front of a live, and sometimes critical audience, here is a great Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk5Nzo2qzro ( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |


The most influential voice of modernism in the art world for 25 years following World War II, particularly in the United States, art critic, cultural philosopher, aesthetician Clement Greenberg was a force to be reckoned with, a man who never held back in asserting his sharp, compelling well-formulated opinions, particularly on topics touching modern art. This collection entitled “Modernism with a Vengeance” contains over 60 entries – essays, reviews, letters, interviews – taken from the years 1957-1969, each and every piece providing anyone interested in art and culture with much to ponder. To whet a reader’s artistic palate, here are quotes along with my comments on two essays I found especially provocative:

The Case for Abstract Art
“Many people say that the kind of art our age produces is one of the major symptoms of what’s wrong with the age. The disintegration and, finally, the disappearance of recognizable images in painting and sculpture, like the obscurity in advanced literature, are supposed to reflect a disintegration of values in society itself.” --------- Of course Greenberg is alluding to nonrepresentational, abstract art of painters like Pollock and Mondrian and people who find such art to be not only degenerate but downright crazy or sick or even silly. The author counters in several ways, including how modern art has been under constant attack ever since the time of the Impressionists. When I myself hear modern art attacked in this way, I keep in mind how Hitler and the Nazis organized their infamous 1937 ‘Degenerate Art’ exhibit, where artists such as Chagall, Grosz, Kandinsky, Klee, Marc and Nolde were put on display for public ridicule.

“I think a poor life is lived by anyone who doesn’t regularly take time out to stand and gaze, or sit and listen, or touch, or smell, or brood, without any further end in mind, simply for the satisfaction gotten from that which is gazed at, listened to, touched, smelled, or brooded upon.” ---------- Greenberg spent a significant part of his life, an hour or two or three every day, standing and gazing at art. He simply could not tolerate people passing judgment on paintings who refused to make a serious commitment to visit museums and galleries. Sidebar: One insightful Greenberg observation: when listening to music or reading literature one is always, on some level, anticipating the next musical phrase or the next page in the book; with abstract art, there is no ‘next’, it is all right there, a viewer has to stick with it, gazing deeper and deeper. Personal note: I think all art, particularly abstract art, suffers from reproductions in books and magazines, that is, many people will judge a 6 foot canvas by a 6 inch photo.

The Identity of Art
“In the long run there are only two kinds of art: the good and the bad. This difference cuts across all other differences in art.” ---------- Reminds me of Eduardo Galeano recounting a story about communist intellectuals pressing a Brazilian artist for a definition of art. His reply, “All I know is this: art is art, or it’s shit.” When we think of a painter of portraits we frequently think of an artist like Rembrandt or Vermeer, but recall how the vast majority of portraits during the 16th and 17th and 18th centuries were painted by mediocre artists commissioned by nobility or the wealthy, commissioned not so much for love of art but for that love that never fades - love of self.

"The error made by too many partisans of non-decorative abstract art is to think that the kind of experience they get from it is different from the kind of experience they get from representational art – to think, in fact, that it is an utterly new kind of experience.” ---------- Nihil sub sole novum. True, each painting or sculpture gives us a unique portal into the realm of the aesthetic, but aesthetic experience is aesthetic experience, as every philosopher of art has known since Alexander Baumgarten in the 18th century, the first philosopher to categorize experience as aesthetic.

“One cannot validly be for or against any particular body of art in toto. One can only be for good or superior art as against bad or inferior art. One is not for Chinese, or Western, or representational art as a whole, but only for what is good in it.” ---------- Greenberg encourages us to hone our ability to ‘see’ by the following exercise: pick an artist you really enjoy. Look carefully at a number of that artist’s painting, if possible the originals, not copies. Determine which paintings especially resonate with you and which other paintings do not. Then carefully assess and evaluate what has caused the difference.

“Quality in art can be neither ascertained nor proved by logic or discourse. Experience alone rules in this area – and the experience, so to speak, of experience.” ---------- Again, to come to know an artist and his or her painting, we have to use our eyes.; not reading, not discussing, not putting the painting into words, but looking very carefully as painting is ultimately a visual, sensual experience.

“Too many people simply refuse to make the effort of humility – as well as of patience – that is required to learn how to experience, or appreciate, art relevantly. Such people do not have the right to pronounce on any kind of art – much less about abstract art. Left to themselves, they would not be able to tell the difference in quality between a calendar picture by Petty and a nude by Rubens. ---------- Thanks, Clement! That’s the way to tell it like it is. The bottom line – to appreciate the visual arts takes a serious commitment.

If this review has piqued an interest to watch Clement Greenberg in action in front of a live, and sometimes critical audience, here is a great Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk5Nzo2qzro



( )
  GlennRussell | Feb 16, 2017 |
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Clement Greenberg is widely recognized as the most influential and articulate champion of modernism during its American ascendency after World War II, the period largely covered by these highly acclaimed volumes of The Collected Essays and Criticism. Volume 3: Affirmations and Refusals presents Greenberg's writings from the period between 1950 and 1956, while Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance gathers essays and criticism of the years 1957 to 1969. The 120 works range from little-known pieces originally appearing Vogue and Harper's Bazaar to such celebrated essays as "The Plight of Our Culture" (1953), "Modernist Painting" (1960), and "Post Painterly Abstraction" (1964). Preserved in their original form, these writings allow readers to witness the development and direction of Greenberg's criticism, from his advocacy of abstract expressionism to his enthusiasm for color-field painting. With the inclusion of critical exchanges between Greenberg and F. R. Leavis, Fairfield Porter, Thomas B. Hess, Herbert Read, Max Kozloff, and Robert Goldwater, these volumes are essential sources in the ongoing debate over modern art. For each volume, John O'Brian has furnished an introduction, a selected bibliography, and a brief summary of events that places the criticism in its artistic and historical context.

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