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Slave av John MacArthur
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Slave (urspr publ 2010; utgåvan 2010)

av John MacArthur (Författare)

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766821,393 (4.04)Ingen/inga
A COVER-UP OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS... Centuries ago, English translators perpetrated a fraud in the New Testament, and it's been purposely hidden and covered up ever since. Your own Bible is probably included in the cover-up! In this book, which includes a study guide for personal or group use, John MacArthur unveils the essential and clarifying revelation that may be keeping you from a fulfilling--and correct--relationship with God. It's powerful. It's controversial. And with new eyes you'll see the riches of your salvation in a radically new way. What does it mean to be a Christian the way Jesus defined it? MacArthur says it all boils down to one word:  SLAVE "We have been bought with a price. We belong to Christ. We are His own possession." Endorsements: "Dr. John MacArthur is never afraid to tell the truth and in this book he does just that. The Christian's great privilege is to be the slave of Christ. Dr. MacArthur makes it clear that this is one of the Bible's most succinct ways of describing our discipleship. This is a powerful exposition of Scripture, a convincing corrective to shallow Christianity, a masterful work of pastoral encouragement...a devotional classic."  - Dr. R. Albert Mohler, President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary "John MacArthur expertly and lucidly explains that Jesus frees us from bondage into a royal slavery that we might be His possession. Those who would be His children must, paradoxically, be willing to be His slaves."  - Dr. R.C. Sproul "Dr. John MacArthur's teaching on 'slavery' resonates in the deepest recesses of my 'inner-man.' As an African-American pastor, I have been there. That is why the thought of someone writing about slavery as being a 'God-send' was the most ludicrous, unconscionable thing that I could have ever imagined...until I read this book. Now I see that becoming a slave is a biblical command, completely redefining the idea of freedom in Christ. I don't want to simply be a 'follower' or even just a 'servant'...but a 'slave'."  - The Rev. Dr. Dallas H. Wilson,  Jr., Vicar, St. John's Episcopal Chapel, Charleston, SC… (mer)
Medlem:ksonnenb
Titel:Slave
Författare:John MacArthur (Författare)
Info:Thomas Nelson Inc (2010), Edition: International, 240 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Slave: The Hidden Truth About Your Identity in Christ av John MacArthur (2010)

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In Slave: The Hidden Truth about Your Identity in Christ, John MacArthur argues that what English readers of the New Testament frequently read as "servant" is typically the Greek word doulos ("slave"), incorrectly translated. Both literally and figuratively, MacArthur asserts that it is "slave" -- not "servant" -- that should describe one's Christian identity.

...the Greek word for slave has been covered up by being mistranslated in almost every English version [of the New Testament]--going back to both the King James Version and the Geneva Bible that predated it. Though the word doulos appears 124 times in the original text, it is correctly translated only once in the King James...Instead of translating doulos as "slave," these translations consistently substitute the word servant in its place. Ironically, the Greek language has at least half a dozen words that can mean servant. The word doulos is not one of them (15).

It should be noted that MacArthur is in no way advocating the modern-day notion of slavery. Chapter 7, "The Slave Market of Sin", devotes several pages to the story of John Newton, who is not only a pastor and the author of "Amazing Grace", but was previously the captain of a slave-trading ship. "As Newton came to realize, the British-American slave trade of his day was utterly unrighteous and unbiblical. The kidnapping or "man-stealing" on which the entire system was built is clearly prohibited by both the Old and New Testaments (Ex. 21:16; 1 Tim. 1:10). Moreover, the racial prejudice it engendered has no place in the church, where all believers are com embers of the body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:13; Gal. 3:28)" (109).

What MacArthur does is place the notion of slavery in its broader historical context. As MacArthur notes at the beginning of Chapter Two: "Slavery was a pervasive social structure in the first-century Roman empire. In fact, it was so commonplace that its existence as an institution was never seriously questioned by anyone. Slaves of all ages, genders, and ethnicities constituted an important socioeconomic class in ancient Rome. Roughly one-fifth of the empire's population was slaves--totaling as many as twelve million at the outset of the first century AD (24)."

MacArthur is on sure footing here, sourcing a wide variety of reputable, secular, academic sources for the historicity of his argument. He is not, however, an apologist for the institution of slavery; rather, he maintains that the commonplace institution of slavery at the time of the writing of the various books of the New Testament provides a metaphor for the Christian's relationship with God. "From the standpoint of first-century culture, slavery served as an apt picture of the believer's relationship to Christ--one of complete submission and subjugation to the master. In both cases, to be a slave was to be under the complete authority of someone else. It meant rejecting personal autonomy and embracing the will of another" (35).

In terms of style, MacArthur strikes a superb balance between scholarship and readability; the book's clarity and readability should make it appeal to the layman, but copious notes allow for further study. There are many present-day, nonacademic Christian authors who would do well to follow the clarity, logic, and source notes of MacArthur's example. The book presents a thesis; places it into historical context; and argues for its validity, all the while providing references to external sources.

Slave is concise, cogent, and provocative. The book is divided into 13 tight chapters, followed by an Appendix that lists Christian thinkers from Polycarp to Augustine to Spurgeon that support his view. For readers interested in well-argued, rational Christian theology, it's a must-read, which is why I give it five stars. ( )
  RAD66 | Nov 12, 2020 |
I have always enjoyed John MacArthur and am reading his study bible this year. Too bad he didn't get this revelation when he did the notes for his study bible. He gets a lot out of one word and I have always thought that word was interesting in how it was used by different translations. He goes some interesting places and comes up with some implications I hadn't thought of. He spends a lot of time diligently promoting his Calvinist theology, and this will make for some interesting discussion. ( )
  Luke_Brown | Sep 10, 2016 |
Slave: The Hidden Truth About Your Identity in Christ was sent to us for free by mail. It's actually my first MacArthur book to read, though I'm fairly familiar with his teaching.

The MacArthur disciples I've known tend to be dogmatic and quick to judge (I'm stating my bias outright). I would describe their approach to Scripture as "hyper-sola scriptura," usually culminating in the idea that the Bible is so perspicacious that everything that can be known about God is found in its pages, and anyone can discover all there is to know about God by studying it hard enough. I know one pastor who attended MacArthur's seminary who claimed he could unseal the prophecies given to Daniel (that God says are intentionally sealed until the endtimes) just by studying it harder. (Daniel apparently didn't study them hard enough, nor did anyone else over the millenia.) The Holy Spirit seems a minor player, and the idea that "none of us read the Bible alone" seems anathema to MacArthurian thought (though I'm not certain of MacArthur's own stances).

MacArthur lapses into that caricature at one point in the book (Pg. 75):
“Nonbiblical ministry, non-expository preaching...usurp Christ’s headship, silencing His voice to His sheep... That kind of devastating approach steals the mind of Christ away from the body of Christ...and quenches the work of His Spirit...and sows seeds of compromise. It deflects the honor due to the true head of the church, and the Lord does not take kindly to those who would steal His glory.”

So, if your pastor preaches a topical sermon he is stealing Christ's glory. If your church has a ministry, like youth ministry, that is not found in Scripture then it's "devastating."

However, Slave is a good word-study, and MacArthur draws on a large amount of sources who examine the use of the word and the context of slavery that OT and NT writers would have been familiar with in writing the words. One modern study that he draws on a lot is Murray Harris' Slave of Christ.He also draws on many historical church figures. If you like books with footnotes taking up half the page, then this is a good one.
The Hebrew word for slave ‘ebed’ is used metaphorically to describe believers (more than 250 times) NT use of the Greek word doulos is similar. It is used at least 40 times in NT to denote relationship of believers to divine master. An additional 30 NT passages use doulos to teach truths about Christian life. (Pg. 12)
The Greek word “kyrios” for Lord is used 750 times in NT, fundamentally meaning “master” or “owner”... relational counterpart to doulos. No slave is greater than his “kyrios” (Pg. 77)

MacArthur wrote the book because of what he sees as an "unintentional cover-up" by modern translations and teachers to re-interpret "slave" as something less harsh. While the KJV translates the word as "servant," this is problematic because servants are hired and slaves are owned.

Roman slaves had no recognized personality, they were not considered people and had no rights. While there are examples of abusive owners being publicly shamed or facing penalties, there are plenty of examples of abuse. However, slaves were allowed to be educated and it wasn't rare to find a slave who was a tailor, or a physician, or other skilled trader. But a slave's worth was based solely upon the worth of his master. In cases where slaves were freed, they were usually given Roman citizenship. There are many recorded cases of slaves becoming adopted as sons of the master, which also provides some metaphorical imagery.

MacArthur draws on John Newton (of Amazing Grace fame) to illustrate the difference between the African slave trade and the Roman one. The major difference being that African slavery was based on racism, whereas Roman slavery was not--slaves were of every race. African slaves were forbidden to learn to read in the American South and if granted freedom were restricted in other ways dissimilar to the Roman time period, where full rights of citizenship were usually bestowed. But other than that, the life of a Roman slave wasn't much better than an African one--a point MacArthur emphasizes.

The NT is explicit that we are either slaves to sin or slaves to Christ. Newton's words paint the image most vividly, as he was most familiar with the slave trade having both been a trader and also subject to being enslaved himself for a brief time. Christ frees us from our sins and binds us to Him as His slaves. Even in early church history, believers referred to one another as "fellow slaves." Ignatius (c. 50-110 a.d.) wrote about the "bishop together with the presbytery and the deacons, my fellow slaves." The Shepherd of Hermas (c. 130 a.d.) refers to believers as "slaves of God." I was reminded of the headstone I saw in Ankara of "John" who was known in death as "the slave of God." We don't like to use those terms today.

MacArthur explores a paradox, for we are also adopted as Sons of God. Pg. 175-176:
"Through Christ we have been set free. We are no longer slaves to sin, to the fear of death, or the condemnation of the Law. But we have been made slaves of God, for Christ, to righteousness. Such is true freedom. Thus, we are simultaneously sons and slaves. The two realities are not mutually exclusive--even if the metaphors are different. Forever we will be part of His family. Forever we will be in His glorious servitude."

(The above passage contains sixteen NT references footnoted.) MacArthur deals with John 15:15 where Jesus told His disciples "No longer do I call you slaves...but I have called you friends." Pg. 176:
"At first glance, it seems as if He might be obliterating the slave metaphor altogether. But such is not the case, as evidenced by the fact that the disciples continued to refer to themselves as 'slaves of Christ' long afterwards...Moreover, Jesus defined friendship as submission to Him: 'You are My friends if you do what I command you' (John 15:14)...That Jesus views believers as both friends and slaves is supported by a host of New Testament passages."

We are also citizens of the Kingdom of Heaven, another aspect that MacArthur explores.MacArthur explores how many NT Christians were both actual slaves or owners of slaves, like Philemon. Slaves are exhorted to work "as for the Lord" and masters are exhorted to treat their slaves well with the understanding that they themselves are slaves of the Master.

MacArthur spends several chapters delving into how the proper contextual understanding of the word "slave" jives with theological Calvinism (which MacArthur never calls Calvinism, but rather "doctrines of Grace."). Slaves had no choice about their ownership, and neither do we as the elect. The imagery of slavery and submission are difficult for all modern believers, and generally rejected by various modern liberal traditions I run into, which helped motivate MacArthur to write Slave. I recommend it as a study and as a good reference for other historical works dealing with the issue.

In all, 3.5 stars out of 5. ( )
  justindtapp | Jun 3, 2015 |
Certainly calvinistic towards the end, but otherwise not bad. This was a audiobook. ( )
  sgsmitty | Jul 19, 2012 |
Read 11/2011; 5/2013
  bobbyemccoy | Nov 13, 2011 |
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A COVER-UP OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS... Centuries ago, English translators perpetrated a fraud in the New Testament, and it's been purposely hidden and covered up ever since. Your own Bible is probably included in the cover-up! In this book, which includes a study guide for personal or group use, John MacArthur unveils the essential and clarifying revelation that may be keeping you from a fulfilling--and correct--relationship with God. It's powerful. It's controversial. And with new eyes you'll see the riches of your salvation in a radically new way. What does it mean to be a Christian the way Jesus defined it? MacArthur says it all boils down to one word:  SLAVE "We have been bought with a price. We belong to Christ. We are His own possession." Endorsements: "Dr. John MacArthur is never afraid to tell the truth and in this book he does just that. The Christian's great privilege is to be the slave of Christ. Dr. MacArthur makes it clear that this is one of the Bible's most succinct ways of describing our discipleship. This is a powerful exposition of Scripture, a convincing corrective to shallow Christianity, a masterful work of pastoral encouragement...a devotional classic."  - Dr. R. Albert Mohler, President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary "John MacArthur expertly and lucidly explains that Jesus frees us from bondage into a royal slavery that we might be His possession. Those who would be His children must, paradoxically, be willing to be His slaves."  - Dr. R.C. Sproul "Dr. John MacArthur's teaching on 'slavery' resonates in the deepest recesses of my 'inner-man.' As an African-American pastor, I have been there. That is why the thought of someone writing about slavery as being a 'God-send' was the most ludicrous, unconscionable thing that I could have ever imagined...until I read this book. Now I see that becoming a slave is a biblical command, completely redefining the idea of freedom in Christ. I don't want to simply be a 'follower' or even just a 'servant'...but a 'slave'."  - The Rev. Dr. Dallas H. Wilson,  Jr., Vicar, St. John's Episcopal Chapel, Charleston, SC

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