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Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art…
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Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying (utgåvan 1990)

av Wolfgang Langewiesche (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
351855,018 (4.27)7
Publisher's Note: Products purchased from Third Party sellers are not guaranteed by the publisher for quality,       authenticity, or access to any online entitlements included with the product. WHAT'S IN STICK AND RUDDER: The invisible secret of all heavier-than-air flight: the Angle of Attack. What it is, and why it can't be seen. How lift is made, and what the pilot has to do with it. Why airplanes stall How do you know you're about to stall? The landing approach. How the pilot's eye functions in judging the approach. The visual clues by which an experienced pilot unconsciously judges: how you can quickly learn to use them. "The Spot that does not move." This is the first statement of this phenomenon. A foolproof method of making a landing approach across pole lines and trees. The elevator and the throttle. One controls the speed, the other controls climb and descent. Which is which? The paradox of the glide. By pointing the nose down less steeply, you descend more steeply. By pointing the nose down more steeply, you can glide further. What's the rudder for? The rudder does NOT turn the airplane the way a boat's rudder turns the boat. Then what does it do? How a turn is flown. The role of ailerons, rudder, and elevator in making a turn. The landing--how it's made. The visual clues that tell you where the ground is. The "tail-dragger" landing gear and what's tricky about it. This is probably the only analysis of tail-draggers now available to those who want to fly one. The tricycle landing gear and what's so good about it. A strong advocacy of the tricycle gear written at a time when almost all civil airplanes were taildraggers. Why the airplane doesn't feel the wind. Why the airplane usually flies a little sidewise. Plus: a chapter on Air Accidents by Leighton Collins, founder and editor of AIR FACTS. His analyses of aviation's safety problems have deeply influenced pilots and aeronautical engineers and have contributed to the benign characteristics of today's airplane. Stick and Rudder is the first exact analysis of the art of flying ever attempted. It has been continously in print for thirty-three years. It shows precisely what the pilot does when he flies, just how he does it, and why. Because the basics are largely unchanging, the book therefore is applicable to large airplanes and small, old airplanes and new, and is of interest not only to the learner but also to the accomplished pilot and to the instructor himself. When Stick and Rudder first came out, some of its contents were considered highly controversial. In recent years its formulations have become widely accepted. Pilots and flight instructors have found that the book works. Today several excellent manuals offer the pilot accurate and valuable technical information. But Stick and Rudder remains the leading think-book on the art of flying. One thorough reading of it is the equivalent of many hours of practice.… (mer)
Medlem:chrischantrill
Titel:Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying
Författare:Wolfgang Langewiesche (Författare)
Info:McGraw-Hill Education (1990), Edition: 1, 400 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying av Wolfgang Langewiesche

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I’ve always been fascintated by flying and, since building myself a computer that can cope with it, I’ve been using a flight simulator to teach myself how to fly. Stick and Rudder is one of those texts that anyone learning to fly is recommended to read. It was first published in 1944 when getting people (read: men) to fly was somewhat of a US government requirement.

Getting people in the air was one thing. Helping them stay there was an increasing problem. The world had rushed headlong into flight but hadn’t put as much thought into what people might do while they were up there. It turned out that they were likely to do many things that seemed logical but were actually going to kill them.

Along came Wolfgang who compiled articles he’d written for aviation magazines along with a section by a colleague and a classic was born. The fact that it is still widely read today when aviation technology has changed beyond recognition belies the fact that, when it comes down to it, the fundamentals of flying remain unchanged.

As someone who has literally only had 2 hours and 55 minutes’ real flying time (Piper PA-28) in his life (and prob. over 100 on a sim), Langewiesche’s lessons are invaluable. The basic premise is this: it’s all about making sure that your angle of attack isn’t too high. I don’t think there was any situation described in the book in which death wasn’t immediately preceeded by stalling and stalling by too high an angle of attack.

If the phrase “angle of attack” is a mystery to you, it’s either because you have no interest in flying and don’t need to know or because you do have an interest in flying but have been learning the wrong things. It’s you, budding aviator, who needs to get a copy of this. Some it is a bit repetitive, but that’s probably necessary. It’s essential reading.

You can probably leave aside all the quaint advice about tightening the stays between your wings and landing aircraft with wheels under the tail. However, you ignore the rest of the book at your peril … and that of anyone with you or beneath you.

For more reviews and the 1001 Books Spreadsheet, visit http://arukiyomi.com ( )
  arukiyomi | Feb 20, 2021 |
There's not much I can add to the discussion about the relevancy of this book, almost 75 years after it was first written. Much of it is centered about important flight fundamentals that should honestly be included in any flight training. (Thankfully, my CFIs do a great job and I did not find any of the "shocking" truths about the airplane controls to be actually all that radical, but what I already knew to be true.)

One thing that may not be terribly relevant today is the discussions on landing, as they pertain mostly to taildraggers. Not that people don't fly conventional-gear aircraft anymore, it is just less common. Nose-wheel airplanes are sort of mentioned as novelty items. Lots of discussion is also made on rudderless and "stall-proof" airplanes, of which I haven't encountered any. Not sure if they were just hyped up or pipe dreams, but as far as my limited knowledge of airplanes goes, any airplane can have its critical angle of attack exceeded by any idiot, and I have yet to meet an airplane without a rudder.

I would say if you skip any section of this book, it would be the last few chapters. Chapter 18 discusses flight safety. It is definitely dated. Read the Nall Report instead. Really. The author of the chapter states that weather is not a deadly problem for most pilots. I disagree. Chapter 19 is mostly a discussion of v-speeds, which is a useful discussion, but the author makes it sound as if it's impossible to determine what these numbers actually are for any given airplane. I'm not sure if AFM/POH documents didn't exist back "in the day" or if they just sucked, but v-speeds are easy to determine for modern airplanes.

All that said, I highly recommend reading this book to any pilot, student or not. You'll probably find out something new or at least have a better conceptual understanding of what you're doing when you're up in the air, and that is always valuable. ( )
  lemontwist | Sep 27, 2018 |
I can't add much to the general consensus. This should be required reading for anyone who wants to fly a fixed-wing craft. Parts of it are getting a little dated, though (it's over 60 years old), but it generally holds up quite well.

For anyone interested in this book, let me also point you to John Denker's See How it Flies, a really excellent discussion of flying techniques and aviation physics presented in a manner accessible to all pilots. It is a great compliment and follow up read to Stick and Rudder and is available in it's entirety free online. ( )
  dan4mayor | Jun 28, 2018 |
Best book I found on basic flying skills. Highly recommended. ( )
  jvgravy | Aug 6, 2015 |
Quotes from collected reviews: "Wolfgang Langewiesche (1907–2002) aviator, author and journalist, is one of the most quoted authors in aviation writing. His book, Stick and Rudder (1944), is still in print, and is considered a primary reference on the art of flying fixed-wing aircraft. Clear spoken, he excelled describing how airplanes fly and how they should be flown by pilots. It has become a standard reference text for aviators. "Stick and Rudder" is the first exact analysis of the art of flying ever attempted. It has been continuously in print for thirty-three years, and has enjoyed steadily increasing sales. Flight instructors have found that the book does indeed explain important phases of the art of flying, in a way the learner can use. It shows precisely what the pilot does when he flies" ......"This 1944 classic flight manual is still the bible of pilots, flight instructors, students, and laypeople interested in how airplanes work." ( )
  patworks | Jul 8, 2013 |
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Publisher's Note: Products purchased from Third Party sellers are not guaranteed by the publisher for quality,       authenticity, or access to any online entitlements included with the product. WHAT'S IN STICK AND RUDDER: The invisible secret of all heavier-than-air flight: the Angle of Attack. What it is, and why it can't be seen. How lift is made, and what the pilot has to do with it. Why airplanes stall How do you know you're about to stall? The landing approach. How the pilot's eye functions in judging the approach. The visual clues by which an experienced pilot unconsciously judges: how you can quickly learn to use them. "The Spot that does not move." This is the first statement of this phenomenon. A foolproof method of making a landing approach across pole lines and trees. The elevator and the throttle. One controls the speed, the other controls climb and descent. Which is which? The paradox of the glide. By pointing the nose down less steeply, you descend more steeply. By pointing the nose down more steeply, you can glide further. What's the rudder for? The rudder does NOT turn the airplane the way a boat's rudder turns the boat. Then what does it do? How a turn is flown. The role of ailerons, rudder, and elevator in making a turn. The landing--how it's made. The visual clues that tell you where the ground is. The "tail-dragger" landing gear and what's tricky about it. This is probably the only analysis of tail-draggers now available to those who want to fly one. The tricycle landing gear and what's so good about it. A strong advocacy of the tricycle gear written at a time when almost all civil airplanes were taildraggers. Why the airplane doesn't feel the wind. Why the airplane usually flies a little sidewise. Plus: a chapter on Air Accidents by Leighton Collins, founder and editor of AIR FACTS. His analyses of aviation's safety problems have deeply influenced pilots and aeronautical engineers and have contributed to the benign characteristics of today's airplane. Stick and Rudder is the first exact analysis of the art of flying ever attempted. It has been continously in print for thirty-three years. It shows precisely what the pilot does when he flies, just how he does it, and why. Because the basics are largely unchanging, the book therefore is applicable to large airplanes and small, old airplanes and new, and is of interest not only to the learner but also to the accomplished pilot and to the instructor himself. When Stick and Rudder first came out, some of its contents were considered highly controversial. In recent years its formulations have become widely accepted. Pilots and flight instructors have found that the book works. Today several excellent manuals offer the pilot accurate and valuable technical information. But Stick and Rudder remains the leading think-book on the art of flying. One thorough reading of it is the equivalent of many hours of practice.

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