HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything

av David Bellos

Andra författare: Se under Andra författare.

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
7203023,632 (3.79)34
Funny and surprising on every page, Is That a Fish in Your Ear offers readers new insight into the mystery of how we come to know what someone else means whether we wish to understand Asteerix cartoons or a foreign head of state. Using translation as his lens, David Bellos shows how much we can learn about ourselves by exploring the ways we use translation, from the historical roots of written language to the stylistic choices of Ingmar Bergman, from the United Nations General Assembly to the significance of James Camerons Avatar. Is That a Fish in Your Ear ranges across human experience to describe why translation sits deep within us all, and why we need it in so many situations, from the spread of religion to our appreciation of literature; indeed, Bellos claims that all writers are by definition translators. Written with joie de vivre, reveling both in misunderstanding and communication, littered with wonderful asides, it promises any reader new eyes through which to understand the world. --amazon.com… (mer)
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 34 omnämnanden

engelska (29)  italienska (1)  Alla språk (30)
Visa 1-5 av 30 (nästa | visa alla)
I'm not familiar with David Bellos or his work, but having seen the promo video for this book - see here - I found the message so witty and interesting that it instantly made me want to read "Is That A Fish In Your Ear?".

While I'm not active in the field of translation - although I am confronted with writings in French and German in my day-job - but from time to time appeal to my colleagues who ARE translators, I wanted to find out more about... translating from one language into another, what one has to pay attention to, how it occurs, what subtleties there are, and so on. Another reason was that we (my colleagues and I) regularly play word/language games, which keeps things interesting, jolly and whatever more.

David Bellos thus treats the different aspects of translation in his newest book. What translation is, the different meanings of the word, how translation takes place, how it's done properly, where translation is applied, how it came to be used to massively in our society, and so on, and so forth. That also includes the role of dictionaries, machine translation (Google Translate, for example), etc. And why English (and French, for instance) are so dominant.

It's a perfect book to learn about translation in the broad sense. And of course the importance of translation! David Bellos doesn't go into the various details of translating itself, rather offers a broad view on it and what you could consider the richness of each language (be it in Europe, Asia, and so on). It made me have much more respect for everyone active in this field, not just the people translating books or documents, but also the interpreters working for the EU, for example.

Not every chapter was as interesting as the other, to me at least, but nevertheless, the author kept the text accessible and witty enough for a large audience to understand it all. He did use some English words I have never read or heard in my entire life, but that makes it also interesting, as perhaps I can use them to enhance my vocabulary. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
We use translations all the time in our ordinary lives and seem to take their usefulness and value for granted — even the most xenophobic American is likely to read from a translation at least once a week without ever reflecting on the fact that it is a translation — yet translators, if Bellos is anything to go by, seem to have the idea that nobody loves them. Admittedly, we do toss around clichés like "never as good as the original" and "poetry is what gets lost in translation". Many of us are prepared to read books in languages we understand imperfectly rather than trusting someone else to clarify them for us. We love to share pictures of hilariously mistranslated notices found in Asian hotels. And theorists of language have shown convincingly that it is impossible to translate meaning from one language into another anyway, and generally rejected the validity of the whole idea of translation.

In this loosely-linked collection of essays on the history and practice of translation, Bellos sets out to demolish those philosophical windmills and show us that his craft is possible, useful and necessary. He does so wittily and engagingly, but doesn't always quite manage to quell our suspicion that they were only windmills in the first place. The core of his argument, really, is that translation isn't about transferring exact semantic content, but about creating likeness, transferring the functional effect of a text. The reader of a translated instruction manual must be able to perform the task being instructed; the reader of a treaty must know what's been agreed; the reader of a novel must be entertained, informed and moved in ways that are sufficiently like the ways the original operates.

There's also a lot of very interesting information here about the things we translate and don't translate, the use of widely-understood "vehicle" languages like English and French, the difference between translations into languages with large numbers of powerful speakers and into those spoken by small groups of relatively powerless people, the (dying?) black art of simultaneous interpretation in conferences, the mysterious appearance of a pisang tree in a Bible translation, the curiously low status literary translation has in the English-speaking world, and lots of other fascinating topics.

Judging by the other reviews of this book, this is an area where linguists have deeply entrenched positions, and Bellos hasn't convinced many of them, but for non-combatants it's an entertaining and informative look into a world we normally only see through the material it produces.

(I also loved the way Bellos doesn't bother to explain the Douglas Adams allusion in his title until nearly 300 pages into the book: anyone who hasn't grown up knowing about such things clearly has no business reading a book like this!) ( )
3 rösta thorold | Dec 28, 2020 |
My whole life, I've had an ongoing love affair with language! I love to explore the boundaries of what it can do, all the ways to subvert and break and leverage the "rules". Translation, in particular, has been something that fascinates me. I'm monolingual and have very little skill in acquiring new languages - but I want so much to know what other languages can do! What thoughts they can think that English can't! I depend on good translations to discover the literature, culture, and ideas of other language groups.

I'm one of those people who tries to get multiple English translations of the same work, just to compare and contrast them, to see if that can help me to isolate the essence of the original.

So when I heard about a book that explores the nature of translation, with a title that references The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, of course I had to read it!

This book wasn't what I expected. The pre-reviews I'd read and the book trailer I'd seen led me to expect something along the line of Arika Okrent's In the Land of Invented Languages, with a similar populism and quirky sense of humor.

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? turned out to be a much more academic and scholarly work than the reviews led me to believe.

Trust me - this isn't a bad thing.

David Bellos brings a very unique perspective to the subject. He obviously understands and is thoroughly educated in the history and theory of translation, but he also knows how to approach issues (both theoretical and practical) from the perspective of someone who does translation, day-in and day-out. This isn't just an intellectual debate for him - there are real-world implications, and real-world solutions, regardless of what the prevailing theories may say. This book is a wonderful marriage of those two perspectives.

It does mean that the book can be a bit abstruse. He does well at avoiding too much specialized vocabulary, and the more esoteric phrases he does use he defines clearly in layman's terms. But, like with all intellectual disciplines, there are ways of thinking - paradigms, structures of logic, patterns of thought and argument - that aren't always easily comprehended by someone not educated in the discipline, no matter how well the author writes it all in common vocabulary.

However, for anyone who has more than a passing interest in language and translation, I don't think there's anything in this book that can't be mastered. And it is a marvelous overview of the nature of the act of translation, and, indeed, the nature of language itself!

My only real complaint is this - I read the iBooks version and there are links throughout the book to other sections where he discusses similar concepts and issues: "See" and "See Also" references made into clickable links. I love that ebooks can do this! The problem is the text they used for these links - for example, the phrase, "previously discussed see here of this book" is just plain awkward. This type of link text formulation appears throughout. Somebody really needs to go through the e-version and redo them. ( )
  johnthelibrarian | Aug 11, 2020 |
A thorough and interesting book on translating. ( )
  GeoffSC | Jul 25, 2020 |
At the start of [b:Mother Tongue|42890|Mother Tongue|Bill Bryson|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1169955355s/42890.jpg|2170063], Bill Bryson gives some examples of poorly translated text seen in other countries. My favourite is the following warning to motorists in Tokyo: “When a passenger of the foot heave in sight, tootle the horn. Trumpet at him melodiously at first, but if he still obstacles your passage, then tootle him with vigour.” That's either comedic genius or more likely what happens if you grab a bilingual dictionary and try to translate word-by-word. A more modern trap is to rely on Automated Machine Translation, or as most of us call it: Google Translate. It's a very handy tool, no doubt, but not infallible. To show what I mean I've translated the remaining paragraphs of my review of David Bellos's rather marvellous Is That a Fish in Your Ear Or Are You Just Pleased to See Me? into various languages and then back-translated to English using Google Translate. Let's see how it goes.

What is translation? This is an easy question, right? I thought, and then I went to read Is That a Fish in Your Ear? And it turns translation is deeper and harder than I've ever given credit for. (French)

Some of the problems that are the ones most people are already aware of, like the fact not all languages ​​have words for the same things. There's a short story by Stephen King that I remember mostly because of its title: Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French. It's about a lady who died and ended up in hell. Except not quite remember the dead, and his punishment is to live in the last hour or so of her life over and over again, each time there is vague feeling that he had done all this before, but not quite that could remember how it goes. You know the one, that feeling, you can only say what it is in French. Of course, the beauty of language is that you do not exactly need a word for everything possible. English might not have "déjà vu" but it can at least string together "phenomenon that has had a strong feeling in the event or an experience actually experience has experienced in the past." Not as enticing, sure, but it means the same thing. (Haitian Creole)

Other problems may subtle. Or more linked with the language. Perhaps a language not a word for something, but you can always invent (or pilfer from another language). But what if the language you are in the translation does not distinguish between definite and indefinite articles? Or between singular and plural? Or what if it evidentials, used a grammatical category, where the subject noun shows. In English we say "a cat" to mean some generic cat, or "the cat" to these specific cat that mean we saw on the internet yesterday. In other languages ​​could not a and the, but a new modifier that between the "cat that I can see now" and "the cat that I saw yesterday" or even distinguishes "I did not see the cat, but I heard it from my buddy Steve." Suddenly, not a word for déjà vu does not like such a big deal seem. (German)

About 1/3 of Is That a Fish in Your Ear? I Sorry, I Can Not Hear You, I Have a Fish in My Ear Waxes Philosophical About what is translation. Occasionally it feels like someone trying to justify their work (a feeling I can relate to as a Mathematician) but it's always as good as written you'd expect from someone whose profession is Conveying meaning. And anyway, it is undeniably interesting and Edifying. It also inspired new found respect for the people who do the live translation of the EU And UN meetings. The sheer Logistics involved in the original EU Resolution that everything said should be instantly translated so that all the Delegates present could understand it are mind boggling. And the fact it still works is a testament to some very skilled people really. (Yiddish)

And you seemed to warm to his task indeed, Bellos is the front part of this book is fascinating all or so half a dozen of the last, where the stretch of this last it seems really enjoy him. There is a chapter. Its ephemeral quality, "style", he covers the translation of the joke. In the translator's slander, to be able to to some abstract system, he pursued academic time poking fun at people who think the translation theory. Only it was a finite list of everyone both spoke rules and grammar was a finite list of words, the language we use these words, you're writing using these rules at all times, it might work. But I is not the case, of course, the quality of human beings to understand each other is what is the very translation. (Japanese)

--

The review pre-translation is hidden below.


What is translation? It's an easy question, right? I thought so, and then I went and read Is That a Fish in Your Ear? And it turns out translation is deeper and more difficult than I'd ever given it credit for.

Some of the issues are ones most people are already aware of, like the fact not every language has words for the same things. There's a short story by Stephen King that I mainly remember because of its title: That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French. It's about a lady who has died and ended up in Hell. Except she doesn't quite remember dying, and her punishment is to live through the last hour or so of her life over and over again, each time having that vague feeling that she's done all this before, but not quite being able to remember how it goes. You know the one, that feeling, you can only say what it is in French. Of course, the beauty of language is that you don't need exactly one word for every possible thing. English might not have “déjà vu” but it can at least string together “the phenomenon of having the strong sensation that an event or experience currently being experienced had been experienced in the past”. Not as catchy, sure, but it means the same.

Other issues can be more subtle. Or more intrinsic to the language. Maybe one language doesn't have a word for something; but you can always invent one (or pilfer one from another language). But what if the language you're translating into doesn't distinguish between definite and indefinite articles? Or between singular and plural? Or what if it uses evidentials, a grammatical category that indicates where the subject noun is. In English we say “a cat” to mean some generic cat, or “the cat” to mean that specific cat we saw on the internet yesterday. In other languages one might not use a and the but a new modifier that distinguises between “the cat I can see right now” and “the cat I saw yesterday” or even “the cat I haven't seen, but I heard about it from my mate Steve.” Suddenly not having a word for déjà vu doesn't seem like such a big deal.

About a third of Is That a Fish in Your Ear? I'm Sorry, I Can't Hear You, I Have a Fish in My Ear waxes philosophical about what is translation. Occasionally it feels like someone trying to justify their job (a feeling I can relate to as a mathematician) but it's always as well written as you'd expect from someone whose profession is conveying meaning. And anyway, it is undeniably interesting and edifying. It also inspired new found respect for the people who do the live translation at the EU and UN meetings. The sheer logistics involved in the original EU resolution that everything said should be instantly translated so that all the delegates present could understand it are mind boggling. And the fact it still works is a testament to some very skilled people indeed.

The last half dozen or so chapters are where Bellos really seems to warm to his task, and while the earlier part of the book is all fascinating, it's this last stretch where he seems to be really having fun. He covers the translation of jokes and of that ephemeral quality of writing: “style”. He pokes fun at translator's detractors and at those who think translation theory as an academic pursuit can be reduced to some abstract system. That might work if language was a finite list of words and grammar was a finite list of rules and everyone both spoke and wrote only using these words and always using those rules. But of course they don't; and the very human quality of understanding one another? That's what translation is.
( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Visa 1-5 av 30 (nästa | visa alla)
This sparkling jewel of a book about all aspects of translation comes from a gifted practitioner of the art.

Lively, impish and enjoyable, Bellos ranges from language wars in the EU to the tough task of taking jokes across frontiers; from computer robot-speak to the "Great Eskimo Vocabulary Hoax" (ie, that myth about the Inuit words for snow).
 
An entertaining yet still scholarly introduction for interested readers, undergraduates, and language professionals.
tillagd av Christa_Josh | ändraLibrary Journal, Marianne Orme (Oct 1, 2011)
 
Bellos argues that the way someone speaks is the key thing, for it “tells your listener who you are, where you came from, where you belong.” The story of Babel, with everyone communicating happily with everyone else in Proto-Nostratic, or Proto-World, an original unitary human tongue, is a Utopian fantasy, not to say a nightmare. It tells the wrong story: “the most likely original use of human speech was to be different, not the same.” As for translation, it is an essential part of this picture. Translation doesn’t happen “after Babel,” it happens during Babel, when one human group wants to know what some other human group is all about, in the spirit (one hopes) of constructive curiosity.
 
Bellos has used this book, in part, as a means of demolishing received ideas about translation. I am all in favour of demolishing received ideas but, as Gloria Steinem said, the truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off. I would have lazily assented to the proposition that a translation is no substitute for the original, but this, as Bellos points out, is a stupid thing to say when you consider that, in fact, a substitute for the original is exactly what a translation is. And if we didn't have translations, then we would, as he points out, have no knowledge of the Bible, the works of Tolstoy, or Planet of the Apes.
 

» Lägg till fler författare (2 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
David Bellosprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Morawetz, SilviaÜbersetzermedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Motto
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Translating is to impose oneself to produce a text though a constraint which is represented by the original text. And for me, in a utopian way of thinking, there is no difference between languages. I would like to know a lot of languages, but unfortunately it takes too long to practice so I am just able to balbutiate in English. But it's very interesting to try to produce the same text when you start from a different one.

Georges Perec,

entretien en anglais avec Kaye Morley, 1981.
Dedikation
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
In memory of my teachers
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Du temps où je n'étais encore qu'un jeune étudiant, le bruit courait dans mon université qu'un certain Roy Harris avait refusé d'ouvrir un séminaire sur la traduction sous prétexte qu'il ne savait pas ce que la « traduction » pouvait bien être.
Citat
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
It was claimed, and for decades it was barely disputed, that what was so special about a natural language was that its underlying structure allowed an infinite number of different sentences to be generated by a finite set of words and rules. A few wits pointed out that this was no different from a British motor car plant, capable of producing an infinite number of vehicles each one of which had something different wrong with it - but the objection didn't make much impact outside Oxford.
Avslutande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Funny and surprising on every page, Is That a Fish in Your Ear offers readers new insight into the mystery of how we come to know what someone else means whether we wish to understand Asteerix cartoons or a foreign head of state. Using translation as his lens, David Bellos shows how much we can learn about ourselves by exploring the ways we use translation, from the historical roots of written language to the stylistic choices of Ingmar Bergman, from the United Nations General Assembly to the significance of James Camerons Avatar. Is That a Fish in Your Ear ranges across human experience to describe why translation sits deep within us all, and why we need it in so many situations, from the spread of religion to our appreciation of literature; indeed, Bellos claims that all writers are by definition translators. Written with joie de vivre, reveling both in misunderstanding and communication, littered with wonderful asides, it promises any reader new eyes through which to understand the world. --amazon.com

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.79)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 5
2.5 2
3 26
3.5 10
4 64
4.5 9
5 17

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 160,499,318 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig