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Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human av…
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Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (urspr publ 1998; utgåvan 1999)

av Harold Bloom (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
2,351234,570 (3.9)35
Harold Bloom, the doyen of American literary critics and author of The Western Canon, has spent a professional lifetime reading, writing about and teaching Shakespeare. In this magisterial interpretation, Bloom explains Shakespeare's genius in a radical and provocative re-reading of the plays. How to understand Shakespeare, whose ability so far exceeds his predecessors and successors, whose genius has defied generations of critics' explanations, whose work is of greater influence in the modern age even than the Bible? This book is a visionary summation of Harold Bloom's reading of Shakespeare and in it he expounds a brilliant and far-reaching critical theory: that Shakespeare was, through his dramatic characters, the inventor of human personality as we have come to understand it. In short, Shakespeare invented our understanding of ourselves. He knows us better than we do: 'The plays remain the outward limit of human achievement: aesthetically, cognitively, in certain ways morally, even spiritually. They abide beyond the end of the mind's reach; we cannot catch up to them. Shakespeare will go on explaining us in part because he invented us... ' In a chronological survey of each of the plays, Bloom explores the supra-human personalities of Shakespeare's great protagonists: Hamlet, Lear, Falstaff, Rosalind, Juliet. They represent the apogee of Shakespeare's art, that art which is Britain's most powerful and dominant cultural contribution to the world, here vividly recovered by an inspired and wise scholar at the height of his powers.… (mer)
Medlem:luporum
Titel:Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Författare:Harold Bloom (Författare)
Info:Riverhead Books (1999), 768 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human av Harold Bloom (1998)

  1. 00
    The Meaning of Shakespeare av Harold Clarke Goddard (Waldstein)
    Waldstein: A much better discussion of Shakespeare's plays than Bloom's overblown alternative. Goddard is not without his own quirks and fetishes, but he is a fine writer and, sometimes, an original and stimulating thinker.
  2. 00
    Characters of Shakespeare's Plays / Lectures on The English Poets av William Hazlitt (Waldstein)
    Waldstein: Another great Shakespearean critic from the past in whose footsteps Bloom professes to follow.
  3. 00
    Samuel Johnson on Shakespeare av Samuel Johnson (Waldstein)
    Waldstein: Since Bloom worships Dr Johnson's Shakespearean criticism, it's good to have some idea what this amounts to. A nice edition, containing Johnson's "Proposals" (1756), "Preface" (1765), selection from his notes to the plays and a fine introduction by Walter Raleigh, is available online. Check also Johnson's notes to the comedies and the tragedies.… (mer)
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The eminent critic Harold Bloom explores Shakespeare in this large book. Bloom’s argument is that before Shakespeare we didn’t have human characters as we know them except on rare occasions. Of course, there was Marlowe and Chaucer, but with Marlowe, it seems that a lot of his characters were hyperbolic parodies. I read “Tamburlaine,” “Dido, Queen of Carthage,” “Doctor Faustus,” and I think the Jew of Malta. Therefore, I am somewhat familiar with Marlowe. As for Chaucer, I believe I read most of Canterbury Tales. Now when I say I read them, I mean that I passed over them once or twice. I didn’t go and study the plays and stories extensively. This might be to my detriment in this case.

Bloom goes through each play that is accepted in the Shakespeare Canon and discusses how these characters act in a believable manner that makes them good characters. So you get a summary of each play along with some of the more important lines. It explores those lines and tells you what those lines mean. Even in his earliest plays, Shakespeare had a faint glimmer of genius. Of course, a lot of his works borrow a great deal from Marlowe, which is why I mentioned him. Eventually, Shakespeare took off the training wheels and makes his own characters.

It is a great new take on the plays of Shakespeare. Even though I had to read Shakespeare in school, examining his works in this light brings a whole new dimension of meaning to what is said. Even Romeo and Juliet becomes interesting again since he explores it in a way that was not acceptable when I read it in high school. Take the character of Mercutio. It might have been revealed to me that he was a bawdy sort that only cared about sex and whatnot, but I think I would have remembered that, especially as a hormone-ridden teen. Even Bloom’s favorite Shakespearean character, John Falstaff, was someone I never encountered when I was younger. I only read Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, and Macbeth when I was in school. I also read some of the sonnets, but those are not included in this book. So I never met Rosalind either, since I didn’t cover any of his comedies or histories.

I don’t really have any issues with this book. It flows really well and the book is organized in a manner that makes it easy to find what you need. It might be a bit of a hassle if you don’t know the order of the Shakespeare Canon, but that is what a Table of Contents is for. It is quite informative and a great resource. If you only read one book on Shakespeare let this one be it. ( )
1 rösta Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
This is probably best understood as a collection of somewhat freeflowing personal musings by Harold Bloom inspired by his readings of Shakespeare's plays. Therefor the enjoyment of the book greatly depends on one's appreciation of Bloom's opinionated take on a few Leitmotivs that he attributes to Shakespeare. Personally, I found Bloom's unrelenting insistence on Shakespeare's exceptionalism somewhat jarring. I learned more about Shakespeare, his life and times, his likely influences and plays by reading Greenblatt's "Will in the world" and Marjorie Garber's "Shakespeare after all". ( )
  ajungherr | Mar 15, 2018 |
It is a great lesson on Shakespeare. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
It is a great lesson on Shakespeare. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
It is a great lesson on Shakespeare. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
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Harold Bloom, the doyen of American literary critics and author of The Western Canon, has spent a professional lifetime reading, writing about and teaching Shakespeare. In this magisterial interpretation, Bloom explains Shakespeare's genius in a radical and provocative re-reading of the plays. How to understand Shakespeare, whose ability so far exceeds his predecessors and successors, whose genius has defied generations of critics' explanations, whose work is of greater influence in the modern age even than the Bible? This book is a visionary summation of Harold Bloom's reading of Shakespeare and in it he expounds a brilliant and far-reaching critical theory: that Shakespeare was, through his dramatic characters, the inventor of human personality as we have come to understand it. In short, Shakespeare invented our understanding of ourselves. He knows us better than we do: 'The plays remain the outward limit of human achievement: aesthetically, cognitively, in certain ways morally, even spiritually. They abide beyond the end of the mind's reach; we cannot catch up to them. Shakespeare will go on explaining us in part because he invented us... ' In a chronological survey of each of the plays, Bloom explores the supra-human personalities of Shakespeare's great protagonists: Hamlet, Lear, Falstaff, Rosalind, Juliet. They represent the apogee of Shakespeare's art, that art which is Britain's most powerful and dominant cultural contribution to the world, here vividly recovered by an inspired and wise scholar at the height of his powers.

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