HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

The Sekhmet Bed: A Novel of Ancient Egypt…
Laddar...

The Sekhmet Bed: A Novel of Ancient Egypt (The She-King Book 1) (utgåvan 2011)

av Libbie Hawker (Författare)

Serier: The She-King (1)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
218697,541 (3.43)3
Is Ahmose's divine gift a blessing or a curse? The second daughter of the Pharaoh, Ahmose has always dreamed of a quiet life as a priestess, serving Egypt's gods, ministering to the people of the Two Lands. But when the Pharaoh dies without an heir, she is given instead as Great Royal Wife to the new king - a soldier of common birth. For Ahmose is god-chosen, gifted with the ability to read dreams, and it is her connection to the gods which ensures the new Pharaoh his right to rule. Ahmose's elder sister Mutnofret has been raised to expect the privileged station of Great Royal Wife; her rage at being displaced cannot be soothed.… (mer)
Medlem:Metatherion
Titel:The Sekhmet Bed: A Novel of Ancient Egypt (The She-King Book 1)
Författare:Libbie Hawker (Författare)
Info:Running Rabbit Press (2011), Edition: 3, 355 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

The Sekhmet Bed av Libbie Hawker

Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 3 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 6 (nästa | visa alla)
Novel of ancient Egypt. Thutmose becomes Pharaoh and marries the two daughters of the dead Pharaoh. The rivalry of the daughters, and the birth of the new woman-king Hatshepsut. Very well written. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
Let me start out by saying that I am not well suited or remotely qualified to review this novel. I seldom read historical fiction; I have only a superficial knowledge of ancient Egypt, and stories of family strife and romance seldom engage my interest. Despite all of this, The Sekhmet Bed held my attention.
I downloaded this book mainly because Ms. Ironside is a prolific contributor to Goodreads discussions and I have found her comments consistently well informed and well considered. That, and she was running a free promotion and I thought it was time to read something different than science fiction, fantasy, and mystery, which are what I normally select for leisure reading and are the genres in which I write.
The story is set in ancient Egypt, a little over 3,000 years ago. The main character, Ahmose, is the younger of two princesses, both of whom become wives of the next pharaoh. As first wife, Ahmose is expected to produce a male heir. This becomes the central plot of the story. Expertly interwoven within that plot is an account of Egyptian history and culture, a description of how ancient Egyptian nobility lived, an exploration of sibling rivalry, some romance, and a bit of political intrigue and power manipulation. It even has a touch of fantasy in the form of prophetic dreams. I can’t say it is the type of novel that would keep me up late but it held my interest for the three days it took me to read it and I never considered not finishing. For someone with my taste in books, this is high praise indeed.
The Sekhmet Bed is very well written, although a bit more literary than I prefer. I don’t think I’m an impatient reader but waxing poetically about the stillness of the air or the history and significance of an article of clothing are normally bits I skim over. And there is some of this in this book but it is not overdone to the point of distraction and I’m sure it is both suitable and even expected for this genre. The characters are well formed and feel real with believable personalities. It is easy to identify and sympathize with them.
I found, at most, about half a dozen typos and a few cases of awkward prose but nothing that disrupted my reading for over a second. These types of things are normal in both traditionally published and self published books so I am quick to overlook them, especially if the price is low.
I would recommend this book to readers of historical fiction. I don’t wish to sound sexist, because I don’t believe I am at all, but I think this particular novel will appeal especially to women because of the female main character, romance, and exploration of family relationships. My overall rating is 4.5 stars.
( )
1 rösta DLMorrese | Oct 14, 2016 |
This was a good story. The background and characters were well fleshed out. It was a difficult time in which to live and this this comes through very clearly. ( )
  scot2 | Sep 7, 2016 |
4.5 starsI'll be honest. Normally I shy away from self-published and independently-published books for the mere fact that I have a very strident and strict editor in my head. When I read books, even mainstream, big house-published books, and find errors, that editor aches to pop out and start flaying the pages with a bold red pencil. Knowing that self-published works suffer even more as they lack the polish a professional editor can achieve, I just don't want to put myself through that kind of anguish, as I would no longer be reading the book for pleasure, but constantly seeking out and destroying all the errors. Not to mention many of the stories put out there are often amateurish, juvenile, and downright execrable. However, almost none of those things apply to The Sekhmet Bed, and my inner editor and I were able to enjoy the book with a minimum of red pencil usage.I won't bother to synopsize (that's a word, right? If not, it is one now) the novel as it's been done so by others, in a clearer, more concise way than what I could achieve. I will say that publishers should be sitting up and taking notice of Ironside. She's managed to write a novel full of compelling characters as well as intense, atmospheric settings. Frankly, she leaves Michelle Moran in the dust; anyone who compares Ironside to Moran is insulting Ironside. The interactions between characters feel real and authentic; the insertion of mystical elements doesn't compromise the integrity of the historical setting as they're not presented as thought they're really happening (except to the person experiencing them, which is only natural; people who have divine visions believe they're real, even if no one else does or understand what they're talking about). The "bad guy" character, Mutnofret, is sufficiently despicable, yet she occasionally shows flashes of humanity in the way she wavers from her actions and shows doubt--which is how "bad guy" characters ought to be written. Even the protagonist isn't perfect as she does things which are questionable and acts out, behaving quite badly at times. About the only character who isn't as fully developed is Thutmose and that's probably because for a lot of the novel he isn't present.It's obvious Ironside did her research as she was able to deviate from some of the accepted theories concerning the characters in an authentic manner, unlike some authors who maybe skim some of the research and decide, to hell with it, they're going to write the story the way they want to, no matter how things really happened. One of the interesting deviations was the way Ironside presented the marriage of Ahmose, Mutnofret, and Thutmose. The prevailing theory is that Thutmose was originally married to Mutnofret--who may or may not have been related to Ahmose as well as Amenhotep I--they had three or four sons, and then Mutnofret died well before Amenhotep I died and Thutmose married Ahmose. However, by making Mutnofret not only a contemporary of Ahmose, but her sister and sister wife, Ironside neatly introduces a built-in package of tension and strife into the royal household, giving her a rich storyline to mine for drama. This alternate history is presented in such an authentic manner, it's easy to believe that it could've been true.Ironside also did what I've been ranting about for years: she used the true Egyptian names for divinities and titles rather than their Greco-Egyptian counterparts. That said, for some of the gods she kept their Greek names, i.e. Osiris and Hathor rather than Ausar/Asar and Het-Heru (which means 'House of Heru [Horus]', just as an aside), which seemed rather strange. However, I was just happy that she even bothered using the ancient Egyptian language in the first place. It has annoyed me for quite some time when I see historical fiction set in ancient Egypt and an author is using the Greek transliterations of Egyptian words. How difficult would it be to use Ausar, Auset, Heru, Tehuti, Nebt-Het and simply place a glossary in the front of the book? It doesn't take long to understand that Tehuti is Thoth or Nebt-Het is Nephthys and using their real names makes the novel that much more authentic.Other than a few editing errors (punctuation errors, the occasional misspelling, missed capitalization) which are to be expected, the book was surprisingly well-written, taut and streamlined. Surprising for the mere fact that I didn't expect it to be so; I expected to find a lot more extraneous narration or choppy dialogue. There was none. Which means finally I've found a writer of ancient Egyptian historical fiction who can wipe the stench of Michelle Moran from my brain. Which also means I'm eagerly looking forward to the next installment in Ironside's series.By the way, I'm simply an armchair Egyptologist. I've been fascinated by the subject for many, many years, but I've never undertaken a scholarly investigation of the subject. My (scanty) knowledge comes from years of absorbing books and other works on the subject. So if something I've pointed out as being wrong isn't, in fact, wrong, then I accept that I'm the one who's wrong. Is that enough wrongs to make a right?Disclaimer: I was asked by the author herself to read and write a fair and honest review of this book. No monies or other favors were promised or exchanged by either party in return for this review and I had never had previous contact with said author. ( )
  LauraDragonWench | May 27, 2012 |
It's been a very long time since a book actually moved me. Not just make me think, grin, chuckle, or even look over my shoulder. But actually move me. This one did. When I started reading The Sekhmet Bed, I had no idea what the story was about other than it takes place in ancient Egypt. So I waded through the opening chapters, intrigued by the cast of regal figures come to life from the dusty pages of history. As the drama unfolded, I found myself lingering on each page while I savored the hypnotic cadence of the prose. I let the author guide me through a world of ancient temples, pharaohs, princesses, and gods. I feasted with queens, danced with harem girls, drifted down the Nile river on a sail barge, and bathed in the light of the moon while riding in a golden chariot. I heard the voices from the past, telling me their story, telling me about their triumphs and their losses, about the people they loved and how they died. I heard the voices of the divine. And then, I reached the end.

I imagine The Sekhmet Bed is the kind of tale that an ancient Greek Playwright might have had performed at the amphitheater. It's difficult not to find yourself moved by the sacrifice of Princess Ahmoset, or Ahmose for short, who trades her own happiness for the welfare of her people, subjecting herself to the often cruel whims of fate. Her trials with her sister, Mutnofret, who is always scheming to wrest control of their husband Thutmose, the reigning Pharaoh, as well as take back her birthright as rightful queen of Egypt, sets the stage for a series of heartbreaking, but emotionally charged confrontations. One can't help but root for Ahmose as she runs the gauntlet, even at times resorting to sleight of hand or force, to find ways to fulfill her destiny as the Gods chosen Queen of Egypt.

This is the first historical novel I've read that blends mysticism with history, blurring the lines between what's actually happening with the internal musings of its protagonist. Did the gods really speak to Ahmose through visions? Or was she the victim of an overactive imagination. The path she walks is perilous and often has deadly consequences for the people in her life. Whether or not her choices were made at the behest of divine figures or hurbis only heightens the drama.

When it was all over, I had a tough time saying good-bye to the characters in Ms. Ironside's book. Many days after reading The Sekhmet Bed, I'm still thinking about them. They are a part of me now and exist somewhere alongside Huck Finn and Frodo. Needless to say, this is a story that stays with you long after the final pages of the book has been turned. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys an emotionally charged tale or, like me, wants to journey to a time and place that exists beyond the insipid pages of history books. ( )
  kevishendrickson | May 24, 2012 |
Visa 1-5 av 6 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

» Lägg till fler författare

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Hawker, Libbieprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Douglas, JoelleOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
So said Amun-Ra, Lord of Waset, presider over the Holy House:

He made his form like the majesty of her husband, the King Thutmose. He found her as she slept in the beauty of her palace. She awakened at the fragrance of the god, which she smelled in the presence of his majesty. He went to her immediately. He imposed his desire upon her; he caused that she should see him in the form of a god.

When he came before her, she rejoiced at the sight of his beauty. His love passed into her limbs, which the fragrance of the god flooded; his fragrance was of the land of Punt.

--Inscription from Djeser-Djeseru, mortuary temple of Hatshepsut, Fifth King of the Eighteenth Dynasty.
Dedikation
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
For my mother, for everything,
For my sister, my best friend.
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Ahmose woke to a terrible, high-pitched wailing.
Citat
Avslutande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
(Klicka för att visa. Varning: Kan innehålla spoilers.)
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS
Kanonisk LCC

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Is Ahmose's divine gift a blessing or a curse? The second daughter of the Pharaoh, Ahmose has always dreamed of a quiet life as a priestess, serving Egypt's gods, ministering to the people of the Two Lands. But when the Pharaoh dies without an heir, she is given instead as Great Royal Wife to the new king - a soldier of common birth. For Ahmose is god-chosen, gifted with the ability to read dreams, and it is her connection to the gods which ensures the new Pharaoh his right to rule. Ahmose's elder sister Mutnofret has been raised to expect the privileged station of Great Royal Wife; her rage at being displaced cannot be soothed.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Populära omslag

Snabblänkar

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.43)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 5
2.5
3 10
3.5 1
4 12
4.5
5 6

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 163,237,341 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig