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Farther away av Jonathan Franzen
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Farther away (urspr publ 2012; utgåvan 2012)

av Jonathan Franzen

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
429745,618 (3.59)10
Längre bort består av ett drygt tjugotal texter som Jonathan Franzen skrivit under åren 19982011. Här berättar han bland annat om sina egna skrivarmödor, om litteratur och fåglar och inte minst om sin mycket saknade vän, författaren David Foster Wallace som tog sitt liv 2008 och vars aska Jonathan Franzen spred på sin resa till ön Längre bort . Chiles kust ligger en ogästvänlig, brant vulkanö, elva kilometer lång och sex kilometer bred, befolkad av miljontals sjöfåglar och tusentals pälssälar. Den chilenska turistmyndigheten döpte på sextiotalet om ön efter Alexander Selkirk, en skotsk äventyrare vars berättelser om sitt ensamma liv på de här öarna troligtvis inspirerade Daniel Defoe till romanen Robinson Crusoe, men lokalbefolkningen använder fortfarande det gamla namnet Masafuera Längre bort. I slutet av förra hösten hade jag behov av att komma längre bort. I fyra månader, utan minsta uppehåll, hade jag åkt runt och pratat om en roman - viljelöst hade jag följt mitt schema. Efter att ha läst om Masafuera började jag i ett visst skede fantisera om att rymma dit och liksom Selkirk leva ensam på det inre av ön. Ur titelessän Längre bort.… (mer)
Medlem:BransonSchool
Titel:Farther away
Författare:Jonathan Franzen
Info:New York, N.Y. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Längre bort av Jonathan Franzen (2012)

  1. 00
    Der Spaß an der Sache: Alle Essays av David Foster Wallace (JuliaMaria)
  2. 00
    The Man Who Loved Children av Christina Stead (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: Jonathan Franzen preist den Roman von Christina Stead im Essay "Die tollste Familie, von der je erzählt wurde".
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Kenyon really does get all the great commencement speakers. I can't even remember who spoke at my graduation.

I actually enjoyed most of the essays in this collection, which is pretty rare for me. "Pain Won't Kill You" and "Farther Away" were a couple of my favourites; however, "I Just Called To Say I Love You" was perfect -- it made me realize that there are indeed others out there who CAN'T STAND THE CELL PHONE IN PUBLIC. I wish I could print out this essay and hand it to everyone who comes into the library yelling into their phone. ( )
  resoundingjoy | Jan 1, 2021 |
While I think Franzen's part

* One of the best authors to arise in the past 20 years
* A grumpy old man
* A fascinating trove of bird-love

this collection of essays focuses on a few things, namely book-reviews, his love for birding, the life, times and death of his friend and brotherly rival David Foster Wallace and a few travels, e.g. to China and Italy.

His genius shines through his grumpiness at times, for instance, when writing about modern technology, which doesn't just sound grumpy, but is insightful and funny:

Consumer-technology products, of course, would never do anything this unattractive, because they’re not people. They are, however, great allies and enablers of narcissism. Alongside their built-in eagerness to be liked is a built-in eagerness to reflect well on us. Our lives look a lot more interesting when they’re filtered through the sexy Facebook interface. We star in our own movies, we photograph ourselves incessantly, we click the mouse and a machine confirms our sense of mastery. And, since our technology is really just an extension of ourselves, we don’t have to have contempt for its manipulability, the way we might with actual people. It’s all one big endless loop. We like the mirror and the mirror likes us. To friend a person is merely to include the person in our private hall of flattering mirrors.

Franzen's honesty is at times very striking, both in fiction and also in these essays. While delving into his relationship to his late parents, it is also notable to see his relationship with his current partner - a couple of times referred to as "a Californian" - and his ex-wife.

From a speech on being a writer, where he lists four questions he often is asked during interviews and goes into them on different levels:

The second perennial question is: What time of day do you work, and what do you write on? This must seem, to the people who ask it, like the safest and politest of questions. I suspect that it’s the question people ask a writer when they can’t think of anything else to ask. And yet to me it’s the most disturbingly personal and invasive of questions. It forces me to picture myself sitting down at my computer every morning at eight o’clock: to see objectively the person who, as he sits down at his computer in the morning, wants only to be a pure, invisible subjectivity. When I’m working, I don’t want anybody else in the room, including myself.

He writes on writer's block, on how birds are treated on Cyprus, collates thoughts on his parents in a quite non-soppy way, which is nice, and goes on to dissect a former marriage. It all ties into "Freedom", his magnum opus.

Funny near-luddite things:

One of the great irritations of modern technology is that when some new development has made my life palpably worse and is continuing to find new and different ways to bedevil it, I’m still allowed to complain for only a year or two before the peddlers of coolness start telling me to get over it already, Grampaw—this is just the way life is now.

I’m not opposed to technological developments. Digital voice mail and caller ID, which together destroyed the tyranny of the ringing telephone, seem to me two of the truly great inventions of the late twentieth century. And how I love my BlackBerry, which lets me deal with lengthy, unwelcome e-mails in a few breathless telegraphic lines for which the recipient is nevertheless obliged to feel grateful, because I did it with my thumbs.

And my noise-canceling headphones, on which I can blast frequency-shifted white noise that drowns out even the most determined woofing of a neighbor’s television set. And the whole wonderful world of DVD technology and high-definition screens, which have already spared me from so many sticky theater floors, so many rudely whispering cinemagoers, so many openmouthed crunchers of popcorn.

Privacy, to me, is not about keeping my personal life hidden from other people. It’s about sparing me from the intrusion of other people’s personal lives.

If you choose to spend an hour every day tinkering with your Facebook profile, or if you don’t see any difference between reading Jane Austen on a Kindle and reading her on a printed page, or if you think Grand Theft Auto IV is the greatest Gesamtkunstwerk since Wagner, I’m very happy for you, as long as you keep it to yourself.

From a trip to China:

the final push into a new hemisphere came two years ago, shortly after Ji was named a Model Citizen. Because of China’s population policy, one thing a Model Citizen really can’t do is have more than one child. Ji already had a boy from a previous marriage, and his wife had a daughter from her previous marriage. They were now expecting their first child as a couple, which would be Ji’s second. One night, when his wife was six months pregnant, the two of them decided that she should go to Canada to have the baby. Their child was born in Vancouver three months later; and Ji was able to remain a Model Citizen.

On the book "The Laughing Policeman" by Sjöwall/Wahlöö, from Sweden:

“The weather was abominable,” the authors inform us on the first page of The Laughing Policeman; and abominable it remains thereafter. The floors at police headquarters are “dirtied” by men “irritable and clammy with sweat and rain.” One chapter is set on a “repulsive Wednesday.” Another begins: “Monday. Snow. Wind. Bitter cold.” As with the weather, so with society as a whole. Sjöwall and Wahlöö’s negativity toward postwar Sweden—a theme in all ten of their books—reaches its delirious apex in The Laughing Policeman. Not only does the Swedish winter weather inevitably suck, but the Swedish journalists are inevitably sensationalist and stupid, the Swedish landladies inevitably racist and rapacious, the Swedish police administrators inevitably self-serving, the Swedish upper class inevitably decadent or vicious, the Swedish antiwar demonstrators inevitably persecuted, the Swedish ashtrays inevitably overflowing, the Swedish sex inevitably sordid or unappetizingly blatant, the Swedish streets at Christmastime inevitably nightmarish. When Detective Lennart Kollberg finally gets an evening off and pours himself a nice big glass of akvavit, you can be sure that his phone is about to ring with urgent business. Stockholm in the late sixties probably really did have more than its share of ugliness and frustrations, but the perfect ugliness and perfect frustration depicted in the novel are clearly comic exaggerations.

His love for Alice Munro's writing:

But who is Alice Munro? She is the remote provider of intensely pleasurable private experiences.

This is great writing at times, and at its worst, too navel-gazing for my own liking, but then isn't that how we find ourselves at our most naked or delve into insanity? ( )
  pivic | Mar 20, 2020 |
Some of these essays were quite interesting. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
Some of these essays were quite interesting. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
Franzen essays are about birds, literature, David Foster Wallace and anti-consumerism. He is able to precisely explain what he likes about literature --pure storytelling, an absence of faux literary tricks and moral ambiguity. Franzen is the most aggressively decent person you will ever come across. Or is he just outlandishly passive-agressive? ( )
  byebyelibrary | Nov 30, 2013 |
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You could call what he’s after secular humanism, a belief that by relentlessly asking the right questions, we can live ethical lives committed to the gradual betterment of society.

This can be seen in the very title of his 2001 novel, “The Corrections,” and in the moral contortions that the book’s hero and Franzen stand-in, Chip, undertakes as he flails around in search of a way to live untainted by the crimes of society.
tillagd av Shortride | ändraThe Forward, Joshua Furst (May 24, 2012)
 
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Längre bort består av ett drygt tjugotal texter som Jonathan Franzen skrivit under åren 19982011. Här berättar han bland annat om sina egna skrivarmödor, om litteratur och fåglar och inte minst om sin mycket saknade vän, författaren David Foster Wallace som tog sitt liv 2008 och vars aska Jonathan Franzen spred på sin resa till ön Längre bort . Chiles kust ligger en ogästvänlig, brant vulkanö, elva kilometer lång och sex kilometer bred, befolkad av miljontals sjöfåglar och tusentals pälssälar. Den chilenska turistmyndigheten döpte på sextiotalet om ön efter Alexander Selkirk, en skotsk äventyrare vars berättelser om sitt ensamma liv på de här öarna troligtvis inspirerade Daniel Defoe till romanen Robinson Crusoe, men lokalbefolkningen använder fortfarande det gamla namnet Masafuera Längre bort. I slutet av förra hösten hade jag behov av att komma längre bort. I fyra månader, utan minsta uppehåll, hade jag åkt runt och pratat om en roman - viljelöst hade jag följt mitt schema. Efter att ha läst om Masafuera började jag i ett visst skede fantisera om att rymma dit och liksom Selkirk leva ensam på det inre av ön. Ur titelessän Längre bort.

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