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Inte längre människa (1948)

av Osamu Dazai

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MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,1302713,582 (3.9)21
Portraying himself as a failure, the protagonist of Osamu Dazai'sNo Longer Human narrates a seemingly normal life even while he feels himself incapable of understanding human beings. Oba Yozo's attempts to reconcile himself to the world around him begin in early childhood, continue through high school, where he becomes a "clown" to mask his alienation, and eventually lead to a failed suicide attempt as an adult. Without sentimentality, he records the casual cruelties of life and its fleeting moments of human connection and tenderness.… (mer)
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» Se även 21 omnämnanden

engelska (25)  franska (1)  Alla språk (26)
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Ty for giving me depression) ( )
  Tayuha | Nov 16, 2021 |
Second Read

I read Osamu Dazai's "No Longer Human" about two years ago, I say about because a heavy fog poisons my memory (I've never been good with recalling temporal things), perhaps it is a testament to the way I've chosen to spend the past few years. Nevertheless, I was (probably) fifteen at the time and this book resonated with me deeply. Actually, "resonated" probably isn't the right word for it... "Intrigued" is probably a better way of putting it (Though it's safe to say that it was intriguing because it also resonated with me). Since I haven't logged my first experience with this book, I might as well do it now. I have to say, however, that rereading it was a surprise, like reopening a present only to find it very different from what you'd found before.

As a fifteen year old, there were two main factors which drove me to purchase and read this novel. One, I had a mad obsession (which began a year prior) with all things Japanese; and two, I'd done prior research on Dazai himself (by research I mean skimming through Wikipedia) and found out about his numerous suicide attempts (not to mention lovers, alcoholism, and drug abuse), which ultimately ended in the taking of his own life. Naturally, the mystical suicide was what drew me towards the book. I guess the context put an air of heaviness and even importance to the book, and that I was, being a middle-class boy at a private school, drawn to the misery that Dazai's life entailed. I still remember reading through the introduction, comprehending about half of what was written, and constantly thinking about suicide. The prologue caught me off-guard, the strange way that the narrator described the boy aroused an image in my head that was at-once disturbing and seductive, the final image evoked a keen sense of desolation. I don't think I've ever really felt such things before. I vaguely remember going through each of the notebooks, becoming more and more obsessed with Yozo's life, feeling what he was feeling (which was, for the most part, a big pile of nothingness). I remember being somewhat disappointed with the ending and that was all. More than anything, it was an entertaining read that gave way to new senses and for that I called it my favourite book.

My experience this time around was extremely different. I understood the introduction and what it was trying to say about globalisation's effects on Japanese literature and culture, though my lack of experience with classic Japanese literature meant I couldn't comprehend the context. The prologue felt more meandering than before, the language strange and almost assumptive. The effect wasn't as strong, but the imagery of the final picture never fails to shock. I found the first notebook to be uninteresting, but was able to make it through without too much trouble. The second notebook, which describes Yozo's student years, caught my attention. I could feel myself becoming more and more obsessed with Yozo's experiences and thoughts, and I'm guessing this is what I felt on the first read-through. The names of the women who he encounters are immediately familiar, and so they must have left an impact on me. Perhaps it was the connotations of kindness and hope that I had associated with them the first time through that they had left such an impact, but there is also a keen melancholy about their names. I found myself less able to understand Yozo's thought process this time around, and questioned myself several times as to whether or not I'd become more "normalised". Nevertheless, I felt sympathy for Yozo and the people who got caught up around him, and felt tears well up in my eyes several times during the novel, even though it is told with little sentimentality. The rape scene was more horrible than I'd remembered. Two years ago I'd reminisced on how it had been described, how it was so effective yet so simple. Only now do I realise the real power of the scene, and how it had broken Yozo completely. The asylum period was strangely tranquil, even though Yozo himself believed he was finally a reject of human society. The tranquility is a consequence of his acceptance of what has happened, and a sign of surrender to the battles of society. He concludes the notebooks as a nihilist more than anything else.

What ultimately "got" me, however, was the epilogue and the self-awareness that it brings to the entire novel. The madam calling Yozo an "angel" and the juxtaposition it forms between the notebooks and "reality" brings a entire new aspect to the novel that is at once heart-rending and lifting. ( )
  yuef3i | Sep 19, 2021 |
Painful and poignant account of a man with deep fear of other people, who like a leaf thrown into the sea is at the mercy of the waves that take him from situation to situation. Extremely impactful. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Sep 17, 2021 |
historical fiction (set in 1930s Japan, originally published in 1973 - semi-autobiographical portrait of a severely depressed and suicidal alcoholic who is never able to empathize or connect with anyone). ( )
  reader1009 | Aug 29, 2021 |
Supongo que soy una persona rara a la que no le gustan estos libros de japoneses “contemporáneos” donde te cuentan sus amargadas y solitarias vidas, sus tentativas de suicidio (y los suicidios de sus amigos y familiares), sus historias de alcohólicos, artistas incomprendidos, deambulares por la vida sin rumbo y finales trágicos. A mi me parecen todos iguales. Iguales, vacíos, risibles (mucho) y estúpidos. Para gustos colores…

Me lo he leído en un fin de semana. Supongo que tardaré menos en olvidarlo. ( )
  isente | Jan 6, 2021 |
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Osamu Dazaiprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Keene, DonaldÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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Wikipedia på engelska (1)

Portraying himself as a failure, the protagonist of Osamu Dazai'sNo Longer Human narrates a seemingly normal life even while he feels himself incapable of understanding human beings. Oba Yozo's attempts to reconcile himself to the world around him begin in early childhood, continue through high school, where he becomes a "clown" to mask his alienation, and eventually lead to a failed suicide attempt as an adult. Without sentimentality, he records the casual cruelties of life and its fleeting moments of human connection and tenderness.

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