HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Känner du till SantaThing, LibraryThings julklappsbyte?
avfärda
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

The Eagle (2005)

av Jack Whyte

Serier: Camulod Chronicles (9)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
4171344,101 (3.91)5
Beginning with The Skystone, the first in his riveting Camulod Chronicles, Jack Whyte has embarked on an ambitious and remarkable re-telling of the Arthurian cycle, giving us a fresh and compelling take on a story that has been beloved for centuries. The Eagle brings us at last to the heart of the tale, the creation of fabled Camelot and the love story that enshrined its glory. Whyte takes us into the minds and lives of Arthur, Guinevere, and Lancelot, three astonishing but fallible people who were bound together by honor, loyalty, and love. Three who created the glory that was Britain's shining dream...and, some say, caused its downfall. The Gaulish nobleman Clothar--known in our time as Lancelot--is drawn to the young High King's court by tales of honor and nobility, where he meets a man whose love of law matches his own. More, he finds in Arthur a life-long friend whose dream of uniting the people of Britain in peace Clothar embraces. And Clothar meets Arthur's queen, a wondrous beauty whose passion and ideals match those of her husband. Together they work to bring Arthur's dream to life. But dark forces rise in opposition to Arthur's plans for creating this noble island nation and it is hard to tell friend from foe in the swirling chaos that ensues. Many tales have been told of the dream that shined and died. This one will astonish even the most jaded.… (mer)
Senast inlagd avprivat bibliotek, DESTROYandPLUNDER, ChuckRinn, elusiverica, nixanook, CaribouKai, GTDave

Ingen/inga.

Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 5 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 13 (nästa | visa alla)
The ninth and final book in the Camulod Chronicles. I liked it more than the previous one - we spent some of the time in Camulod! People talked to each other about things besides war! Lots of recognisable stuff from the legends came to pass! And as a medical minded person I got a kick out of this scene where a knight falls down a cliff and breaks his leg, and they have to treat it and get him home again with tools they improvise from what they can find in the woods. But overall, the ending of this series was much weaker than the beginning. It’s a shame, I loved the beginning, I wanted it to stay good.
It says in the blurb that Jack Whyte had always considered the Arthur/Guinevere/Lancelot love triangle to be the heart of the Arthurian story, so I was disappointed by how little this version impacted me, and how little these three interacted on page. Arthur and Gwinnifer had a political marriage, and they liked and respected each other but were never really in love. Clothar and Gwinnifer liked each other too, and we’re told they eventually fell in love and got married after Arthur’s death, but everything was strictly platonic before then. And Arthur and Clothar were supposedly the very best of friends, but that just didn’t ring true for me. It’s frustrating, because I know Whyte can do better! Publius Varrus and Caius Britannicus from the first and second books in the Chronicles had a special friendship that I was very invested in. If Varrus had told Caius “You and my wife are the two people I love most in the world, I need you both to be safe”, I would have accepted it without question and felt feelings about it; but when Arthur said that to Clothar I was just like “… Is that true, though? Really? I’m gonna want some more evidence than just you saying it”.
Overall, I found this ending unsatisfying. The thing about the Arthurian story is that it’s a tragedy, and this version took away a lot of the power in that. There was nothing between Clothar and Gwinnifer, Mordred always knew he was the product of incest but he didn’t care and neither did anyone else, he was openly acknowledged as Arthur’s son and heir, Clothar left Camulod before it fell because Arthur ordered him to get out and take the queen with him, and Arthur lost his final war not due to betrayal or anyone’s fatal flaws but simply due to the overwhelming might of the enemy. It was nice, but somehow felt hollow to me. ( )
  elusiverica | Aug 15, 2020 |
Some spoilers ahead:

While the title refers to Arthur, make no mistake: This is Clothar’s story. Clothar is the Frankish name the author has given to Lancelot to better fit in with his historical setting. He was introduced in the previous book, The Lance Thrower, where he earned the nickname of Lance, based on his weapon of choice. Clothar spends most of his time in either the north of Britain or in Gaul, rather than in Camulod, so he has little time to spend with his king. While this saddens him, it also saddens me because I want more Arthur.

I enjoy how bits from the legends are worked into this story, from the way that Clothar saves King Pelles’ life, to how he fights a succession of five enemy knights. Whyte also subverts the generally accepted legend, in that there is never an affair between Clothar and Gwinnifer, and how Mordred is not the downfall of the King. (That comes from a wound that he receives in battle about 2/3 of the way through the book, but that never properly heals, such that it continues to weaken him through his remaining years.)

This being the final installment in the Camulod Chronicles, it brings the Arthurian tale to a close, but almost too abruptly for my taste. In Clothar’s final meeting with the king, he is instructed to take the Queen back to Gaul with him, for her safety, since a battle is coming soon and the King has doubts that he will survive. As such, Clothar isn’t there at the end. He just relays hearsay and rumor, noting that he may never know the truth of what happened on that battlefield. A) I find this unsatisfactory, the diving into rumor in a series that has done so well at presenting the whole story as factually and historically and in-depth as possibly can be. Why the sudden change at the end? B) It is made clear that Clothar is extraordinarily good at infiltrating the enemy force and speedily bringing about the end of a war or siege. He does in the North against Connlyn in just over a week, what Arthur’s army had been trying to accomplish over the past two years. Therefore, with Arthur knowing this strength of his friend, why would he not use this asset in the upcoming battle. Send Gwinnifer away with another knight, but keep Clothar at hand to assist in the final fray.

But that’s not how it plays out. On the whole, I did enjoy the book and the entire series. It has the tendency to get bogged down in the minutia of the military, though. On one such occasion, Arthur tells Clothar that all his sources are clergymen, so he does not know the military particulars of the battle which sent Atilla the Hun heading back East. And then there’s a page and a half describing this battle down to the details of which flank routed which. I learned about Atilla in school, of course, but this is far more than I ever learned in any classroom about this particular battle.

I recommend this book to any who’ve read the previous in the series, obviously, but also to those who are interested in seeing Arthur and Camulod in the most realistic setting possible. If you have an interest in military history as well, then this series is definitely something you will enjoy. ( )
  Jessiqa | Feb 9, 2014 |
Best best.....This writer takes you to the time of King Aurther, and shows how they are human and lived. Eating off tranchers and not many veggies in those times. ( )
  donagiles | Oct 21, 2012 |
I really loved this entire series (all 9 of them) Each and every one was a really exciting fast paced story that would stand alone, but read in sequence add up to a wonderful story about Arthur and his knights.
The story starts a long time before Arthur is born, when Excalibur is forged and Camulod (Camelot) is born. How his ancestors created it and how Arthur himself came to be High King of all Britain, with Merlyn his mentor.
It is a fictional account of course feasible enough, if Arthur ever really existed!
I am so sorry to have finished this series, but have the set sitting on my shelf ready to go again, which I am positive will happen! ( )
  Glorybe1 | Sep 15, 2012 |
The last book in the Camulod Chronicles. I'm sad...this was a fantastic 9-book series. ( )
  wendytrim | Mar 26, 2011 |
Visa 1-5 av 13 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

Ingår i serien

Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska (2)

Beginning with The Skystone, the first in his riveting Camulod Chronicles, Jack Whyte has embarked on an ambitious and remarkable re-telling of the Arthurian cycle, giving us a fresh and compelling take on a story that has been beloved for centuries. The Eagle brings us at last to the heart of the tale, the creation of fabled Camelot and the love story that enshrined its glory. Whyte takes us into the minds and lives of Arthur, Guinevere, and Lancelot, three astonishing but fallible people who were bound together by honor, loyalty, and love. Three who created the glory that was Britain's shining dream...and, some say, caused its downfall. The Gaulish nobleman Clothar--known in our time as Lancelot--is drawn to the young High King's court by tales of honor and nobility, where he meets a man whose love of law matches his own. More, he finds in Arthur a life-long friend whose dream of uniting the people of Britain in peace Clothar embraces. And Clothar meets Arthur's queen, a wondrous beauty whose passion and ideals match those of her husband. Together they work to bring Arthur's dream to life. But dark forces rise in opposition to Arthur's plans for creating this noble island nation and it is hard to tell friend from foe in the swirling chaos that ensues. Many tales have been told of the dream that shined and died. This one will astonish even the most jaded.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.91)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 6
2.5 3
3 17
3.5 4
4 28
4.5 6
5 27

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 152,612,900 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig