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Innovatörerna : genierna och nördarna som skapade den digitala…

av Walter Isaacson

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MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,2663310,916 (4.14)33
"Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson's revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? In his masterly saga, Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It's also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators shows how they happen"--… (mer)
Senast inlagd avDawnDrain, rmjwalex, privat bibliotek, organised, ProfWhite, Colleen5096, cadima, kevin_LT

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» Se även 33 omnämnanden

Quais as capacidades que permitiram a certos inventores e em- preendedores transformar as suas ideias visionárias em realidade? O que provocou os seus saltos criativos? Por que razão alguns fo- ram bem-sucedidos e outros fracassaram?
Em "Os Inovadores", Walter Isaacson dá resposta a estas questões, oferecendo-nos a mais completa história da revolução digital, uma narrativa fascinan- te acerca daqueles que criaram o computador e a Internet. Numa escrita empolgante e ágil, Isaacson organiza um roteiro minucioso que começa com Ada Lovelace, filha de Lord Byron e pioneira da programação na década de 1840, passa pela fundação do mítico Si- licon Valley e segue até aos nossos dias, com Steve Jobs ou Bill Gates. Explorando mais as personalidades desconcertantes destes génios do que as suas invenções, Os Inovadores é o guia indispen- sável para o modo como nasce a inovação e para se compreender o mundo digital que é hoje o nosso.
  LuisFragaSilva | Nov 8, 2020 |
An excellent review of the history of the digital technology. ( )
  addunn3 | Jun 23, 2020 |
Almost everything we do these days has some link to the world wide web, or involves interacting with some sort of computer, but how did these things become so pervasive and essential? In this book Isaacson writes about the people that made the companies, that made the products that we all now use.

Starting on the earliest computer, the Analytical Engine conceived by Charles Babbage, which he made with Byron’s daughter Ada Lovelace. It was a purely mechanical device, made at the very limits of engineering capability at the time. It took another century until the next computers surfaced. A man called Vannevar Bush was instrumental in developing a differential analyser for generating firing tables, followed in World War 2 by the Colossus at Bletchley used for attacking the Nazi Enigma codes. These new room sized contraptions used the old vacuum tube valves, and consumed vast amounts of energy and took large numbers of people to maintain and use the machines.

For computers to reach the point where you could get more than one in a room, the technology would need to be miniaturised. The team in America that achieved this using the semi conducting properties of silicon would earn themselves a Nobel Prize. This moment was the point where the modern computer age started, especially when it was realised that there could have a variety of components, and therefore circuits on a single piece of silicon. These new microchips were initially all taken by the US military for weapons, but as the price of manufacture fall, numerous commercial applications could be realised.

Some of the first products that used microchips that the general public saw were calculators, but as engineers started to use their imaginations almost anything was possible. The coming years saw the development of the first video games, personal computers that you could fit on a desk and the birth of the internet. Most of these innovations came out of one place in California that we now know as Silicon Valley. It formed a new way of working too, with unlikely collaborations, spin offs and the beginning of software and hardware companies that have now become household names.

It didn’t take too long for people to start wanting to hook computers together. The original ARPNET was a military network, but it soon had links to academia and not long after that the geeks found it. It was still a niche way of communicating, until Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web with hypertext linking, and the world was never the same again.

Isaacson has written a reasonable book on the history of computing and the internet, and the significant characters and people who discovered or made things, or who just happened to be in the right place at the right time. He covers all manner of noteworthy events right up to the present day. Mostly written from an American centric point of view, it feels like a book celebrating America’s major achievements in computing. Whilst they have had a major part to play, they have not had the stage entirely to themselves; there is a brief sojourn to Finland about Linux and CERN with Berners-Lee there is very little mention of other European.

There are some flaws though. He doesn’t mention the dark net or any of the other less salubrious activities that happen online either; ignoring them doesn’t make them go away. There is very little mention of mobile technology either. It was a book worth reading though, as he shows that some of the best innovations have come from unlikely collaborations, those that don’t follow the herd and those whose quirky personalities and way of seeing the world bring forth products that we never knew we needed. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
Make no mistake, this is not a book written for a reader who is only casually interested in the Digital Revolution. I came to this realization when, after wading through the first third of the book, we were barely into the mid 1970s. As I've commented about several "comprehensive" tomes that have focused on a variety of subjects, I believe the author could have made this admittedly informative book more accessible — and a bit more enjoyable — if he had trimmed many details that simply aren't needed to provide a good grasp of digital innovations. Also, I felt that the book lacked "cohesion" in some spots. I had to give myself a one-month break before returning to "The Innovators." Having said that, I learned a lot about this complex and ever-changing topic. I ended the book a bit weary, but glad that I made the investment of time. ( )
1 rösta brianinbuffalo | Nov 22, 2019 |
Exceptional - I always felt that I missed something in the internet/WWW thingummy. Gave me some perspective. In conjuction with "the long tail" (chris Anderson) I get it and how I missed it. ( )
  Brumby18 | Jun 18, 2019 |
Visa 1-5 av 33 (nästa | visa alla)
... even at its most rushed, the book evinces a genuine affection for its subjects that makes it tough to resist. Isaacson confesses early on that he was once “an electronics geek who loved Heathkits and ham radios,” and that background seems to have given him keen insight into how youthful passion transforms into professional obsession. His book is thus most memorable not for its intricate accounts of astounding breakthroughs and the business dramas that followed, but rather for the quieter moments in which we realize that the most primal drive for innovators is a need to feel childlike joy.
 

» Lägg till fler författare (12 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Isaacson, WalterFörfattareprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Bernard SigaudÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Boutsikaris, DennisBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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In May 1833, when she was seventeen, Ada Byron was among the young women presented at the British court.
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Innovation requires articulation.
Sometimes innovation involves recovering what has been lost.
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"Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson's revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? In his masterly saga, Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It's also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators shows how they happen"--

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