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The Pharaoh's Daughter

av Mesu Andrews

Andra författare: Se under Andra författare.

Serier: Treasures of the Nile (1)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
1179232,602 (4.36)Ingen/inga
"Fear is the most fertile ground for faith." "You will be called Anippe, daughter of the Nile. Do you like it?" Without waiting for a reply, she pulls me into her squishy, round tummy for a hug. I'm trying not to cry. Pharaoh's daughters don't cry. When we make our way down the tiled hall, I try to stop at ummi Kiya's chamber. I know her spirit has flown yet I long for one more moment. Amenia pushes me past so I keep walking and don't look back. Like the waters of the Nile, I will flow. Anippe has grown up in the shadows of Egypt's good god Pharaoh, aware that Anubis, god of the afterlife, may take her or her siblings at any moment. She watched him snatch her mother and infant brother during childbirth, a moment which awakens in her a terrible dread of ever bearing a child. Now she is to be become the bride of Sebak, a kind but quick-tempered Captain of Pharaoh Tut's army. In order to provide Sebak the heir he deserves and yet protect herself from the underworld gods, Anippe must launch a series of deceptions, even involving the Hebrew midwives--women ordered by Tut to drown the sons of their own people in the Nile. When she finds a baby floating in a basket on the great river, Anippe believes Egypt's gods have answered her pleas, entrenching her more deeply in deception and placing her and her son Mehy, whom handmaiden Miriam calls Moses, in mortal danger. As bloodshed and savage politics shift the balance of power in Egypt, the gods reveal their fickle natures and Anippe wonders if her son, a boy of Hebrew blood, could one day become king. Or does the god of her Hebrew servants, the one they call El Shaddai, have a different plan--for them all? "--"This epic tale of Pharoah's daughter--sister to King Tut and the rescuer of the infant Moses"--… (mer)
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I have mixed feelings about this. The characters of Anippe and Ankhe don't feel very well developed. Some of the choices seem to make things unnecessarily complicated. I like that she keeps Mehy (Moses) family involved in his life. ( )
  nx74defiant | Mar 6, 2024 |
The Pharaoh's Daughter is the beautiful story of Anippe, the woman that found Moses in the Nile and raised him as her own. Anippe witnessed her mother's death giving birth to her baby brother. She was only five years old, but it made a lasting impact on her life. She experiences so much loss in a short period of time. But because her marriage to Sebek placed her on the Nile, she learns of El Shaddai through the living testimony of her Hebrew slaves. When her deceptions come to light, her loyal slaves come to her rescue and she becomes Bithiah. But will she learn to forgive herself? Will she accept El Shaddai as the one true God? Will she finally see that God put her on that path because of his plan and purpose for her life.

This was a beautiful story of enduring, unfailing faith. You get a glimpse into the lives of the Hebrew slaves, their strength amidst their oppression is just awe inspiring. There's several heartbreaking moments where I actually started crying and had to stop reading for awhile because I was so moved. I can't wait to read Miriam's story when it comes out. I loved the part when Bithiah finally understood about God's peace and loving someone completely.

**I received a free copy of this novel from Random House in exchange for my honest review.** ( )
  sunshine9573 | Dec 19, 2022 |
This novel provides a great insight to the world of ancient Egypt while enlightening us on the biblical story. Mesu Andrews' hard work and thoughtfulness are revealed in the writing as well as in the introduction and her intro Note.
  NicoleHills | Oct 15, 2018 |
Intrigue in the Court!!

Thank you, Mesu Andrews!! I, like the main character, Anippe, didn't really have a clue to how bad the Israelite slavery was, or the depravity of man in war could be. In the Pharaoh's Daughter, Mesu paints a graphic picture of the intrigue,avarice,insanity, and violence of ancient Egypt.

Having always been fascinated with the pyramids, the hieroglyphics, the stories of the ancient Egyptian gods, here is the the counterpoint to that amazing view. We see not only the riches and power of Egypt, but the corruption, the devaluation women, the plotting to ascend and keep the throne,the horrific condition of slaves.

Fear, peace,terror, greed, contentment, want, plenty, life, death, love, and hate;all are woven together as deftly as the famous Egyptian cotton into an incredibly moving story that will stay with me forever.

Halfway through this story, I wondered how Mesu can justify not sticking to Biblical accounts. As I read on, I was amazed at the twists that proved that Mesu DOES INDEED STAY TRUE TO SCRIPTURE, but uses strategic verses and story turns that sews everything seamlessly together.

I was thrilled to received this book and another as a gift through a contest sponsored by Mesu Andrews, Multmomah/Waterbrook, and Mommynificent's blog. ( )
  Becky_L | Apr 16, 2016 |
Mesu Andrews has created an inventive story detailing Moses’ Egyptian mother in her latest book, The Pharaoh’s Daughter. Little is known about this woman, including just when she lived and which Pharaoh was her father. Through extensive research into the historical record and Scripture, Andrews developed a plausible backstory for the woman who would play a pivotal role in the early life of Moses.

Annipe has had many names — the name given her by the Great Queen to serve as a decoy to deceive the god of the underworld, the name given her by her adopted parents, and the name given her at her marriage. None really portray who she is, only what others want her to be. A woman in a world ruled by men and fraught with political intrigue and danger, Annipe forms her life through manipulation, cunning and deceit and lives that life under the cloud of fear. Only when she embraces the name given to her by God, does she find peace.

Andrews has written a compelling and complex story filled complex characters from all aspects of the Ancient Egyptian world — Pharaoh’s, generals, soldiers, noblemen and slaves. All are caught up in the structured world dictated by the myths of the gods and the politics of warring nations. This was a brutal time in the world’s history and is depicted in a thorough, but not overly graphic manner. And although the Egyptians are those that rule, no one has any real control except the God of the Hebrews, El Shaddai. God’s sovereignty is an overarching theme for the book. While man strives to steer and command, only God has the power to affect events and bring about His plans. Another theme woven throughout the book is fear and its effects. Towards the end of the book, the Hebrew slave, Mered, tells Annipe “If fear robs us of truth, faith never has a chance to grow”. That truth resonated with this reader.

One caveat: this book is fiction. That should be obvious, but needs to be said. A lot of literary license is taken in forming the story. Scripture is used as a framework and historical figures play a dominant role, but many of the events depicted are pure supposition by the author. It is a great what if, but not a pure retelling of the Biblical record. Also the story is slow in building. I struggled with keeping focused and connecting with many of the characters. I am glad I stuck with it, though, because Annipe’s later life redeemed much of her past.

An interesting look at who Moses’ mother could have been, I recommend The Pharaoh’s Daughter.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(Thanks to Waterbrook for a review copy. All opinions shared are mine alone.) ( )
  vintagebeckie | Sep 14, 2015 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Mesu Andrewsprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Miles, RobinBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat

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To my daughters, Trina and Emily. You are my heroes.
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The royal linen closet is a dark hiding place, but I'm a big girl - almost five inudations old - so I'm trying not to be afraid.
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Ingen/inga

"Fear is the most fertile ground for faith." "You will be called Anippe, daughter of the Nile. Do you like it?" Without waiting for a reply, she pulls me into her squishy, round tummy for a hug. I'm trying not to cry. Pharaoh's daughters don't cry. When we make our way down the tiled hall, I try to stop at ummi Kiya's chamber. I know her spirit has flown yet I long for one more moment. Amenia pushes me past so I keep walking and don't look back. Like the waters of the Nile, I will flow. Anippe has grown up in the shadows of Egypt's good god Pharaoh, aware that Anubis, god of the afterlife, may take her or her siblings at any moment. She watched him snatch her mother and infant brother during childbirth, a moment which awakens in her a terrible dread of ever bearing a child. Now she is to be become the bride of Sebak, a kind but quick-tempered Captain of Pharaoh Tut's army. In order to provide Sebak the heir he deserves and yet protect herself from the underworld gods, Anippe must launch a series of deceptions, even involving the Hebrew midwives--women ordered by Tut to drown the sons of their own people in the Nile. When she finds a baby floating in a basket on the great river, Anippe believes Egypt's gods have answered her pleas, entrenching her more deeply in deception and placing her and her son Mehy, whom handmaiden Miriam calls Moses, in mortal danger. As bloodshed and savage politics shift the balance of power in Egypt, the gods reveal their fickle natures and Anippe wonders if her son, a boy of Hebrew blood, could one day become king. Or does the god of her Hebrew servants, the one they call El Shaddai, have a different plan--for them all? "--"This epic tale of Pharoah's daughter--sister to King Tut and the rescuer of the infant Moses"--

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