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Mannen i det höga slottet (1962)

av Philip K. Dick

Andra författare: Tom Weiner (Berättare)

Andra författare: Se under Andra författare.

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner / Omnämnanden
11,719312432 (3.68)2 / 470
It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war -- and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.
  1. 81
    Faderland av Robert Harris (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alternate history
  2. 61
    The Yiddish Policemen's Union av Michael Chabon (AlanPoulter)
    AlanPoulter: Both are alternate histories set in a USA changed by World War Two.
  3. 62
    Konspirationen mot Amerika av Philip Roth (ateolf)
  4. 20
    Bring the Jubilee av Ward Moore (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alt history
  5. 10
    Androidens drömmar av Philip K. Dick (Anonym användare)
  6. 10
    The Castle of Crossed Destinies av Italo Calvino (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: Two very different approaches to using an oracle, one the Tarot, another the I Ching, to help structure a book's narrative.
  7. 10
    Farthing av Jo Walton (rretzler)
  8. 54
    The Years of Rice and Salt av Kim Stanley Robinson (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alternate history
  9. 00
    Divine Invasions: A Life of Philip K. Dick av Lawrence Sutin (Anonym användare)
  10. 00
    The Lost Continent av Edgar Rice Burroughs (Sylak)
    Sylak: Alternate history following WWI
  11. 00
    Resurrection Day av Brendan DuBois (RG_331)
    RG_331: What would happen if the Cold War escalated
  12. 00
    London tillhör oss : det naziockuperade Storbritannien 1941 av Len Deighton (Michael.Rimmer)
    Michael.Rimmer: Alternate History: Axis powers won WWII
  13. 01
    The Iron Dream av Norman Spinrad (andyl)
    andyl: Alternate history novel that also uses the book within a book device.
  14. 12
    China Mountain Zhang av Maureen F. McHugh (ahstrick)
  15. 01
    Den underjordiska järnvägen av Colson Whitehead (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Disturbing Alternate Histories of America.
1960s (211)
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When Ambiguity Is the Point

Perhaps quoting from Freddie Mercury’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” best puts what many consider the finest of Philip K. Dick’s works into perspective: “Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?” Ambiguity threads its way throughout The Man in the High Castle, because ambiguity is the whole point of the novel. Is the timeline followed by the characters in the novel reality? Or, is true reality, as Juliana comes to believe, that expressed in the alternative reality book most in the novel are reading, The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? Perhaps chance dictates the path of a life or a country, and divining what’s to come means foreseeing with mystical help, as, again, most of the characters do employing I Ching (Book of Changes). The layering Dick accomplishes makes The Man in the High Castle a terrific reading experience, a novel guaranteed to elevate a person’s anxiety level.

The Man in the High Castle tells two alternative histories to what we accept as our reality. First is that which seems like reality to the characters and to readers. The Axis powers won WWII, they have divided the U.S. into the Pacific States of America (Japan), the Eastern States (Germany), and the Rocky Mountain buffer zone; further, Germany still seeks out Jews for extermination, and have pretty much killed everybody in Africa, as well as the Slavs. Roma, etc.; and they have an active space program, to boot. The second alternative history has the Allies winning WWII. However, the new order does not resemble the reality we known. America has resolved many of its problems, including its inherent racism. Great Britain, now both racist and expansionist, reigns as America’s rival. The Soviet Union has collapsed.

Readers experience this reality through the eyes and thoughts of the main characters: Robert Childan, owner of an American antique shop in San Francisco, who finds himself constantly kowtowing to his new masters, the Japanese; Nobusuke Tagomi, head of the Japanese trade mission, who, like many occupiers, is fascinated by American artifacts and buys from Childan; Frank Frink, whose real name is Fink, a Jew in hiding, a master artisan of fake antiques, who launches his own company; Baynes, who actually is Rudolf Wegener on a mission to reveal to the Japanese the German plans to nuke the Home Islands; and Juliana Frink, who lives in Colorado, where she hooks up with Joe Cinnadella, a Nazi assassin sent to kill Hawthorne Abendsen, author of the alternative history within this alternative history, The Grasshopper Lies Heavy.

You certainly can read much into the story Dick weaves, and many have. Dick constantly asks us to ponder what is real and what isn’t. He doesn’t explicitly ask the question, but this theme runs throughout the novel. For instance, a customer complains that Childan has sold him a fake antique gun as an original. Childan discovers that his supplier is fabricating items to appear as antiques. What’s real and what isn’t, and, more perplexing, does knowing matter? On a larger scale, by the end we’re challenged to wonder which is reality, the story we have read, or the one we’ve glimpsed in excerpts and discussions of The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? Have we crossed over into another reality when we follow Julianna into Abendsen’s home, which turns out to be anything but a fortress.

Then there are the issues of chance and change, the ideas the future lived by the characters was somehow ordained and immutable, much as we might believe the outcome of WWII could not have been other than it was because it is our reality. Dick has the various characters addressing these questions of reality by resorting to the I Ching for answers about the fortuity of an event, or what might await them should they take one action or another. Frank Frink, for instance, tries to determine if he should start his own business. He receives an answer that appears contradictory; in other words, ambiguous.

Finally, why does any of it matter anyway, what the characters do, what we ourselves do? Look to the book title The Grasshopper Lies Heavy. It compresses the ideas expressed in Ecclesiastes 12:5 into a short phrase, those ideas being: All things come to an end, the world we know moves on, and can become a world different from what we know.

So, fellow readers, enjoy the ambiguity that is The Man in the High Castle. ( )
1 rösta write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
When Ambiguity Is the Point

Perhaps quoting from Freddie Mercury’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” best puts what many consider the finest of Philip K. Dick’s works into perspective: “Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?” Ambiguity threads its way throughout The Man in the High Castle, because ambiguity is the whole point of the novel. Is the timeline followed by the characters in the novel reality? Or, is true reality, as Juliana comes to believe, that expressed in the alternative reality book most in the novel are reading, The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? Perhaps chance dictates the path of a life or a country, and divining what’s to come means foreseeing with mystical help, as, again, most of the characters do employing I Ching (Book of Changes). The layering Dick accomplishes makes The Man in the High Castle a terrific reading experience, a novel guaranteed to elevate a person’s anxiety level.

The Man in the High Castle tells two alternative histories to what we accept as our reality. First is that which seems like reality to the characters and to readers. The Axis powers won WWII, they have divided the U.S. into the Pacific States of America (Japan), the Eastern States (Germany), and the Rocky Mountain buffer zone; further, Germany still seeks out Jews for extermination, and have pretty much killed everybody in Africa, as well as the Slavs. Roma, etc.; and they have an active space program, to boot. The second alternative history has the Allies winning WWII. However, the new order does not resemble the reality we known. America has resolved many of its problems, including its inherent racism. Great Britain, now both racist and expansionist, reigns as America’s rival. The Soviet Union has collapsed.

Readers experience this reality through the eyes and thoughts of the main characters: Robert Childan, owner of an American antique shop in San Francisco, who finds himself constantly kowtowing to his new masters, the Japanese; Nobusuke Tagomi, head of the Japanese trade mission, who, like many occupiers, is fascinated by American artifacts and buys from Childan; Frank Frink, whose real name is Fink, a Jew in hiding, a master artisan of fake antiques, who launches his own company; Baynes, who actually is Rudolf Wegener on a mission to reveal to the Japanese the German plans to nuke the Home Islands; and Juliana Frink, who lives in Colorado, where she hooks up with Joe Cinnadella, a Nazi assassin sent to kill Hawthorne Abendsen, author of the alternative history within this alternative history, The Grasshopper Lies Heavy.

You certainly can read much into the story Dick weaves, and many have. Dick constantly asks us to ponder what is real and what isn’t. He doesn’t explicitly ask the question, but this theme runs throughout the novel. For instance, a customer complains that Childan has sold him a fake antique gun as an original. Childan discovers that his supplier is fabricating items to appear as antiques. What’s real and what isn’t, and, more perplexing, does knowing matter? On a larger scale, by the end we’re challenged to wonder which is reality, the story we have read, or the one we’ve glimpsed in excerpts and discussions of The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? Have we crossed over into another reality when we follow Julianna into Abendsen’s home, which turns out to be anything but a fortress.

Then there are the issues of chance and change, the ideas the future lived by the characters was somehow ordained and immutable, much as we might believe the outcome of WWII could not have been other than it was because it is our reality. Dick has the various characters addressing these questions of reality by resorting to the I Ching for answers about the fortuity of an event, or what might await them should they take one action or another. Frank Frink, for instance, tries to determine if he should start his own business. He receives an answer that appears contradictory; in other words, ambiguous.

Finally, why does any of it matter anyway, what the characters do, what we ourselves do? Look to the book title The Grasshopper Lies Heavy. It compresses the ideas expressed in Ecclesiastes 12:5 into a short phrase, those ideas being: All things come to an end, the world we know moves on, and can become a world different from what we know.

So, fellow readers, enjoy the ambiguity that is The Man in the High Castle. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
I have some mixed feelings about this book. I feel comfortable giving this 4 stars because I found ideas in it to be quite interesting but it is probably closer to a 3.5-star book. In many ways, this book is all about the ideas presented and lacks much actual plot so if you prefer plot-driven books this is almost certainly not the book for you. I definitely liked the parts spent with Juliana Frink the most. I just thought she was by far the most interesting character with the most interesting backstory. I liked the ways that we saw the world had changed but in many ways I wanted more of those small details to show us just how different this world is. In the near future, I will probably be reading [b:Farthing|183740|Farthing (Small Change, #1)|Jo Walton|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1442714837s/183740.jpg|1884104] by [a:Jo Walton|107170|Jo Walton|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1353809579p2/107170.jpg] which is a book set in a similar idea of Nazis having won WWII but I believe it is more of a mystery so I will be interested to see how that compares and which one I end of liking more. Overall I would maybe recommend this to people who really like alternate history but I wanted just a bit more out of this. I do still want to read some of the author's other work and see if I like that. ( )
  AKBouterse | Oct 14, 2021 |
A second miss for me from Philip K Dick.

The story culminated in some incredible ideas, but 90% of the book was expository for the sake of the ending... and it's an ending that requires some work (or some Googling) to understand even after you've turned the final page.

Dick is no doubt a talented writer, philosophical thinker, and a pioneer of the alternate history genre. But the prose style feels more like a literary exercise - choppy sentences packaging a political narrative - than a joy for the sake of reading.

Generally I have no problems with the multiple narrators style, jumping back and forth between characters. But there was so little holding them together. I had hoped that their stories would converge, but they did not do so to any satisfactory degree, leaving several characters feeling entirely extraneous. I'd have preferred each character's story to be written in succession starting with Childan, then Frank, then Wegener, followed by Tagomi and his transcendental experience, then Juliana Frink as the unexpected protagonist (/saviour/enlightener/whatever you might call her), which would have correctly set the expectation that they were almost entirely without overlap.

There was not nearly enough foreshadowing for the ending. I had to backtrack a couple of times to work out whether I'd missed something in the text. Maybe I did, but I'm most certainly not going to read this a second time to squeeze the value out of it. ( )
  Katrana | Oct 13, 2021 |
What a weird beautiful little book. I don't think I understood all of it but maybe that's part of the point. The recursive aspects were truly inspired. I didn't love it as much as Androids but I'm looking forward to the TV series and more of his short stories. ( )
  nosborm | Oct 10, 2021 |
Visa 1-5 av 312 (nästa | visa alla)
Dick is entertaining us about reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation.... We have our own homegrown Borges.
tillagd av GYKM | ändraNew Republic, Ursula K. LeGuin
 
Philip K. Dick's best books always describe a future that is both entirely recognizable and utterly unimaginable.
tillagd av GYKM | ändraThe New York Times Book Review
 
Philip K. Dick... has chosen to handle... material too nutty to accept, too admonitory to forget, too haunting to abandon.
tillagd av GYKM | ändraWashington Post
 

» Lägg till fler författare (25 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Dick, Philip K.primär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Weiner, TomBerättaremedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Brown, EricInledningmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Gambino, FredOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Glasserman, DebbieFormgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Gleeson, TonyOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Guidall, GeorgeBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Moore, ChrisOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Nati, MaurizioÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
North, HeidiOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Powers, Richard M.Omslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Stöbe, NorbertÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Weiner, TomBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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To my wife, Anne, without whose silence
this book would never have been written
To my wife Tessa and my son Christopher,
with great and awful love
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They know a million tricks, those novelists...Appeals to the base lusts that hide in everyone no matter how respectable on the surface. Yes, the novelist knows humanity how worthless they are, ruled by their testicles, swayed by cowardice, selling out every cause because of their greed...all he's got to do is thump on the drum, and there's the response. And he laughing of course, behind his hand at the effect he gets. (p. 128)
At six-fifteen in the evening she finished the book. I wonder if Joe got to the end of it? she wondered. There's so much more in it than he understood. What is it Abendsen wanted to say? Nothing about his make-believe world. Am I the only one who knows? I'll bet I am; nobody else really understands Grasshopper but me - they just imagine they do.
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Wikipedia på engelska (2)

It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war -- and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.

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