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All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and…
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All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent… (utgåvan 2016)

av Rebecca Traister (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
6252528,758 (3.84)15
"In a provocative, groundbreaking work, National Magazine Award­-finalist Rebecca Traister, "the most brilliant voice on feminism in this country" (Anne Lamott), traces the history of unmarried women in America who, through social, political, and economic means, have radically shaped our nation. For legions of women, living single isn't news; it's life. In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies--a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism--about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890-1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven. But over the course of her vast research and more than a hundred interviews with academics and social scientists and prominent single women, Traister discovered a startling truth: the phenomenon of the single woman in America is not a new one. And historically, when women were given options beyond early heterosexual marriage, the results were massive social change--temperance, abolition, secondary education, and more. Today, only twenty percent of Americans are wed by age twenty-nine, compared to nearly sixty percent in 1960. The Population Reference Bureau calls it a "dramatic reversal." All the Single Ladies is a remarkable portrait of contemporary American life and how we got here, through the lens of the single American woman. Covering class, race, sexual orientation, and filled with vivid anecdotes from fascinating contemporary and historical figures, All the Single Ladies is destined to be a classic work of social history and journalism. Exhaustively researched, brilliantly balanced, and told with Traister's signature wit and insight, this book should be shelved alongside Gail Collins's When Everything Changed"--… (mer)
Medlem:ktshpd
Titel:All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation
Författare:Rebecca Traister (Författare)
Info:Simon & Schuster (2016), Edition: Later prt., 352 pages
Samlingar:Own, Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:to-read, own-e

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All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation av Rebecca Traister

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» Se även 15 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 25 (nästa | visa alla)
I liked the premise but it was too academic for me. ( )
  RakishaBPL | Sep 24, 2021 |
I gave this book an extra star for the importance of some of the messages and points that she makes. I especially liked the part about the history of women and economic policies that disenfranchised people of color. However, most of the women she interviewed for the book seemed to be financially well off and were very successful in jobs that they loved. She used them as anecdotes describing the options available nowadays to women. Well, that's great, but that isn't the average person. The resources that they have available to them (they can outsource housework, cooking, laundry, etc) might seem fantastical to some readers. ( )
  -Pia- | Sep 3, 2021 |
I Did Not Finish (DNF) at 25 percent.

I was really hoping for something to sink my teeth into. Maybe because most people still don't understand what feminism means in the U.S. It's not a dirty word. It doesn't mean you hate men.

"The advocacy of women's rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men."

This book reads like a very long and boring history book that zig zags all over the place. I stupidly thought the book would maybe be looking at unmarried women and their rise over the past 20-30 years. Instead we go all the way back to the 1800s and go forward.

The author also throws in some anecdotal information here and there and then has some statistics. I just really didn't feel as immersed in what she was trying to do. I think she could have taken a page out of Aziz Ansari's "Modern Romance" and just bring some fun into the book. And I felt like she was hand waving away most of the single black women rise as well. I think because she was trying to say that rise was due to other factors and she didn't want to get into them all in this book. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
This book did some things right, and some things not right, but overall I would recommend it. The biggest thing the author did right was centering the book around the intersectionalities of gender, race, and class, and clearly exploring how those things combined to determine women's choices around their partnership status, as well as society's views of them and it. The biggest things the author did wrong were (1) assuming the reader came from the same place she did when she started reseaching the book, which is thinking her generation (1990's college grads) invented the normalization of single life (ummm) and (2) asserting that self-identification as gay or lesbian is a 20th century construct (double ummm). Nevertheless, it draws on diverse sources--thankfully, most of whom are women--and presents some thought provoking viewpoints, and is in general an easy read. ( )
  sanyamakadi | May 29, 2020 |
There was plenty of interesting information and analysis.

Once the book moves out of the historical era and into modern society it shifts to using a lot more anecdotes to illustrate points. This is useful to an extent, but also includes a lot more trivial information about the lives of random people that doesn't feel particularly meaningful. The stories also dilute the narrative and makes it harder to focus on the points being made. That's probably more of a personal taste thing, because there could be many others who might feel that the stories make the material less abstract and easier to connect with.

The author does a reasonable job of trying to connect and factor in issues across class, race, culture and sexuality. The one area where they don't seem to go very much is gender, or more specically when people are not gender-conforming.

Overall it was an interesting read. I'd be into a condensed version, if one existed. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
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"In a provocative, groundbreaking work, National Magazine Award­-finalist Rebecca Traister, "the most brilliant voice on feminism in this country" (Anne Lamott), traces the history of unmarried women in America who, through social, political, and economic means, have radically shaped our nation. For legions of women, living single isn't news; it's life. In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies--a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism--about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890-1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven. But over the course of her vast research and more than a hundred interviews with academics and social scientists and prominent single women, Traister discovered a startling truth: the phenomenon of the single woman in America is not a new one. And historically, when women were given options beyond early heterosexual marriage, the results were massive social change--temperance, abolition, secondary education, and more. Today, only twenty percent of Americans are wed by age twenty-nine, compared to nearly sixty percent in 1960. The Population Reference Bureau calls it a "dramatic reversal." All the Single Ladies is a remarkable portrait of contemporary American life and how we got here, through the lens of the single American woman. Covering class, race, sexual orientation, and filled with vivid anecdotes from fascinating contemporary and historical figures, All the Single Ladies is destined to be a classic work of social history and journalism. Exhaustively researched, brilliantly balanced, and told with Traister's signature wit and insight, this book should be shelved alongside Gail Collins's When Everything Changed"--

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