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Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness,…
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Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets (utgåvan 2017)

av Luke Dittrich (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
3552356,617 (3.73)13
"In the summer of 1953, a renowned Yale neurosurgeon named William Beecher Scoville performed a novel operation on a 27-year-old epileptic patient named Henry Molaison, drilling two silver-dollar sized holes in his forehead and suctioning out a few teaspoons of tissue from a mysterious region deep inside his brain. The operation helped control Molaison's intractable seizures, but it also did something else: It left Molaison amnesic for the rest of his life, with a short term memory of just thirty seconds. Patient H.M., as he came to be known, would emerge as the most important human research subject in history. Much of what we now know about how memory works is a direct result of the sixty years of near-constant experimentation carried out upon him until his death in 2008. Award-winning journalist Luke Dittrich brings readers from the gleaming laboratory in San Diego where Molaison's disembodied brain -- now the focus of intense scrutiny -- sits today; to the surgical suites of the 1940s and 50s, where doctors wielded the powers of gods; and into the examination rooms where generations of researchers performed endless experiments on a single, essential, oblivious man: H.M.. In the process, Dittrich excavates the lives of Dr. Scoville and his most famous patient, and spins their tales together in thrilling, kaleidoscopic fashion, uncovering troves of well-guarded secrets, and revealing how the bright future of modern neuroscience has dark roots in the forgotten history of psychosurgery, raising ethical questions that echo into the present day"--… (mer)
Medlem:sunshani
Titel:Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets
Författare:Luke Dittrich (Författare)
Info:Random House Trade Paperbacks (2017), Edition: Reprint, 480 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets av Luke Dittrich

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» Se även 13 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 23 (nästa | visa alla)
This was an interesting dive into the live of a surgeon during one of America's "dark times" for mental health. This brings up topics in a similar way as "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" but the book is more in depth and doesn't hit the ethics questions as deeply. It was harder to read than I expected but worth the effort. ( )
  GretchenCollins | Dec 10, 2020 |
The story of Patient H.M., Henry Molaison, is so incredibly fascinating it is nearly impossible to put down. The author, Luke Dittrich, does a wonderful job providing comprehensive historical context as he takes you through Henry's life, death, and post-mortem existence. Dittrich weaves together the equally fascinating lives and histories of all the significant figures around Patient H.M., of particular note William Beecher Scoville (the author's grandfather, and the doctor who conducted the lobotomy of Henry's brain), and Suzanne Corkin (the doctor who took over Henry's case, and conducted five decades of research on him).

Patient H.M. was the singularly most studied research subject in history. His brain, and what researchers learned from it, have laid the foundation and fundamental understanding of what we know about how the brain, especially memory, works today. Thanks to Dittrich, those of us outside the medical and psychological community can also appreciate the contribution Henry Molaison made to science. ( )
  H4ppyN3rd | Oct 6, 2020 |
At the age of seven young Henry Molaison stepped into the street and collided with a bicyclist. Following the accident he began suffering from increasingly frequent and severe epileptic seizures, leading ultimately to an experimental brain surgery performed by neurosurgeon William Beecher Scoville. Unfortunately, the surgery was only partially successful with respect to his seizures and, tragically, the procedure left him unable to form any new memories for the remainder of his life. The author, journalist Luke Dittrich, just happens to be Scoville's grandson, and this is the story of the surprising number of ways his family intersects with that of the most famous patient in the history of neuroscience, as well as a primer on the history of the science itself.

This was an enlightening read, though it was far from a page-turner. The overall number of intersectionalities among the family, the patient, the neighborhood, and even President Lincoln, was pretty astonishing. Recommended for readers with an interest in science and medicine. ( )
  ryner | Dec 16, 2019 |
The topic of this book thrilled me to no end; mental health practices, lobotomies, asylums, and what patients (specifically patient H.M.) went through.
The writing style, however, was severely lacking.
Do you have that one friend that manages to find an interesting topic, but then proceeds to mangle the delivery and talk about it to death? That friend could have wrote this.
There were asides to asides that didn't add anything to the narrative, repetitive information every new section, very little about Henry Molaison, which the book was titled after, and long, drawn out paragraphs about what Dittrich assumed what had happened.
It is a shame, since I really wanted to learn more about this fascinating topic. Unfortunately, I couldn't get into this book at all.

Thank you to Netgalley for a copy in exchange for an unbiased review. ( )
  JPetersonReads | Dec 23, 2018 |
This was my #nonfiction pick for September. I love a good medical drama and this one did not disappoint. H.M. got a lobotomy in an attempt to cure epilepsy, but ended up unable to make new memories. Researched for over 50 years. The story of H.M. is interesting enough by itself, but then you have the added twist of the author's connection to the story. Really fascinating. Crazy how the whole thing is still wrapped up in controversy. ( )
  Aseleener | Mar 24, 2018 |
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Man is certainly no poorer as a experimental animal merely because he can talk.

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Every day is alone in itself. Whatever enjoyment I've had, and whatever sorrow I've had.

Henry Molaison
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"In the summer of 1953, a renowned Yale neurosurgeon named William Beecher Scoville performed a novel operation on a 27-year-old epileptic patient named Henry Molaison, drilling two silver-dollar sized holes in his forehead and suctioning out a few teaspoons of tissue from a mysterious region deep inside his brain. The operation helped control Molaison's intractable seizures, but it also did something else: It left Molaison amnesic for the rest of his life, with a short term memory of just thirty seconds. Patient H.M., as he came to be known, would emerge as the most important human research subject in history. Much of what we now know about how memory works is a direct result of the sixty years of near-constant experimentation carried out upon him until his death in 2008. Award-winning journalist Luke Dittrich brings readers from the gleaming laboratory in San Diego where Molaison's disembodied brain -- now the focus of intense scrutiny -- sits today; to the surgical suites of the 1940s and 50s, where doctors wielded the powers of gods; and into the examination rooms where generations of researchers performed endless experiments on a single, essential, oblivious man: H.M.. In the process, Dittrich excavates the lives of Dr. Scoville and his most famous patient, and spins their tales together in thrilling, kaleidoscopic fashion, uncovering troves of well-guarded secrets, and revealing how the bright future of modern neuroscience has dark roots in the forgotten history of psychosurgery, raising ethical questions that echo into the present day"--

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