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Being Muslim (Groundwork Guides) av Haroon…
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Being Muslim (Groundwork Guides) (utgåvan 2008)

av Haroon Siddiqui

Serier: Groundwork Guides (2006)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
805259,649 (3.29)Ingen/inga
Since 9/11, the world has been confronted with the most volatile facets of Islam with little explanation of how or why these controversial elements developed. Written by one of North America's most honored journalists, Being Muslim presents an up-front and clear explanation of this complex and emotion-laden subject. Although the varying branches of Islam are analyzed and their history outlined, the real focus of the book is on the present. In speaking about and crossing political, cultural, and religious divisions, the author offers a unique perspective based on life in Canada, a country in which diverse groups of people have found a way to live in peace. Aimed at young adults, the book offers invaluable insight to readers of all ages, cultures, and religious traditions.… (mer)
Medlem:ronicadibartolo
Titel:Being Muslim (Groundwork Guides)
Författare:Haroon Siddiqui
Info:Groundwood Books (2008), Edition: Revised, Paperback, 160 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:***
Taggar:multicultural, Muslim, war, 6-12

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Being Muslim (Groundwork Guides) av Haroon Siddiqui

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Visar 5 av 5
Written for muslims and non-muslims alike, Being Muslim, a book authored by Haroon Siddiqui, is a modern history that attempts to explain the complexities of Islam in the 21st century and the political events leading to western cultures perceptions of the religion and its followers.
Haroon Siddiqui, native of India, began his career as a journalist in 1963 and worked his way to become an award-winning Canadian editorial writer and one of Canada’s most decorated journalists. Mr. Siddiqui has spent most of his career as a journalist working on the Iraq-Iran Crisis and championing human rights for the Muslim population. Over his 42 year career, he was recognized by the Indo-Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian Islamic Congress, York University, the National Press Club, and the University of Regina for his work as a journalist.

Siddiqui demonstrates tremendous scholarship. For the six chapters, Siddiqui provides provides anywhere between four and twenty-eight news, media, and scholarly sources. All of his citations can be found in the back of the book titled “Notes.” What impresses me most about Siddiqui’s scholarship is the fact that he provides his readers not only with a list of sources where he drew his information, but also a list of twelve resources and suggested reading if the reader chooses to further research the questions he raises.

Siddiqui does make distinctions between what is fact and what is opinion. It is very clear when he is quoting or referencing various sources and when he is not. His opinions come mainly in the form of interpretations and justifications of statistics. Siddiqui does paint with broad brush strokes and make use of generalization when he is oversimplifying and stereotyping the Western and Christian worldview, but I think he does this in order to argue that Muslims around the world, especially in Europe and North America, are victims of similar stereotyping and generalizations.

All in all, Being Muslim is an informative read and a relevant text that I think helps the reader understand several of the basic tenants Islam and the complexity of the political situation surrounding western interest in the Middle East. I enjoyed it. ( )
  JoeBar | Feb 15, 2017 |
Some sections are very good, but in others, marrying non-Muslims. This author is either ignorant or dishonest, in reporting what the Qur'an and shariah say.
  fadeledu | May 14, 2014 |
I recommend this book for all people to read. It explains the Muslim faith and how difficult it is to be Muslim in this time. I see Muslims in a different light now. They have to deal with so much prejudice all around the world. This book talks about the customs, traditions, and the history of Muslims all around the world. ( )
  ronicadibartolo | Sep 30, 2013 |
Children can understand the political talk that the book offers. The chapters are well formed and easy to comprehend. Good aide for Muslim children growing up in a post 9/11 America. Helpful to teach about discrimination because of religion. ( )
  MelAKnee | Nov 23, 2011 |
Being Muslim is part of the Groundwork Guides series, which are designed to be "an overview of key contemporary political and social issues," as well as provide "a lively introduction [to the topic] and a strong point of view." A few dozen pages into this book, I had started thinking of it as a Cliff Notes for Islam -- in many ways, it is a primer on Islam for non-Muslim westerners -- except that it was, well, livelier. And more opinionated.

Haroon Siddiqui is apparently controversial in his profession as a newspaper columnist, but I found this book to be expansive and even-handed. What I liked best about it, in fact, is how well Siddiqui makes it clear that it is very difficult to begin a sentence "Islam is--" or "Muslims are--" and end it in a way that is true to the breadth of Islamic practice or Muslim experience. Similarly, Siddiqui tends to highlight that many of the things that Westerners criticize Islam for -- for example, state-sanctioned violence against women -- are controversial within Islam. For example, when discussing religiously-justified violence against Muslimahs, Siddiqui cites Islamic feminists such as Zainah Anwar of Sisters of Islam and Nobel Laureate Shirin Ebadi, who critique patriarchal practices of Islam as being anti-Islamic distortions of the Prophet's teachings.

At times, Siddiqui seems given to making "no true Scotsman" arguments about what is or is not a true expression of Islam. However, when he does so, he is clearly responding to Western propaganda that Islam is inherently backward, patriarchical, violent, etc. He does not deny that there are major problems within many Islamic societies, nor that Islamic faith or law is intimately tied up in some of those problems. However, he often provides fuller context for many of those issues (f'rex, he discusses non-religious causes of anti-Western feeling, where such feelings exist), and he often critiques human rights abuses in Islamic nations from an inherently Islamic perspective (f'rex, he criticizes the failure of sharia courts to adhere to Qur'anic rules of evidence or Qur'anic penalties for false accusation in the administration of adultery cases).

In all, I found Being Muslim to be a nuanced response to Western anti-Islamic propaganda, debunking some criticisms, expanding on others, providing both perspectives and background that Westerners are often unaware of, and sometimes turning the criticism back on Western society. He also challenges the moral authority of Western writers to critique Islam, charging that anti-Islamic propaganda often intensifies the very problems that propagandists are supposedly concerned about, and that the propaganda encourages human rights abuses against Muslims by or within Western nations. The volume itself is quite slim, but includes ample references and an essential reading list for people who wish to explore some Siddiqui's themes and arguments further.

All in all, it's an engaging (and manageably short) antidote to the things that "everyone knows" (i.e., the notions that are bandied about Western, non-Muslim societies) about Islam and Muslims.
  sanguinity | Nov 17, 2008 |
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Since 9/11, the world has been confronted with the most volatile facets of Islam with little explanation of how or why these controversial elements developed. Written by one of North America's most honored journalists, Being Muslim presents an up-front and clear explanation of this complex and emotion-laden subject. Although the varying branches of Islam are analyzed and their history outlined, the real focus of the book is on the present. In speaking about and crossing political, cultural, and religious divisions, the author offers a unique perspective based on life in Canada, a country in which diverse groups of people have found a way to live in peace. Aimed at young adults, the book offers invaluable insight to readers of all ages, cultures, and religious traditions.

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