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Natural causes : an epidemic of wellness,…
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Natural causes : an epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and… (utgåvan 2018)

av Barbara Ehrenreich

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
4092545,985 (3.34)26
A New York Times bestseller! From the celebrated author of Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich explores how we are killing ourselves to live longer, not better. A razor-sharp polemic which offers an entirely new understanding of our bodies, ourselves, and our place in the universe, NATURAL CAUSES describes how we over-prepare and worry way too much about what is inevitable. One by one, Ehrenreich topples the shibboleths that guide our attempts to live a long, healthy life -- from the importance of preventive medical screenings to the concepts of wellness and mindfulness, from dietary fads to fitness culture. But NATURAL CAUSES goes deeper -- into the fundamental unreliability of our bodies and even our "mind-bodies," to use the fashionable term. Starting with the mysterious and seldom-acknowledged tendency of our own immune cells to promote deadly cancers, Ehrenreich looks into the cellular basis of aging, and shows how little control we actually have over it. We tend to believe we have agency over our bodies, our minds, and even over the manner of our deaths. But the latest science shows that the microscopic subunits of our bodies make their own "decisions," and not always in our favor. We may buy expensive anti-aging products or cosmetic surgery, get preventive screenings and eat more kale, or throw ourselves into meditation and spirituality. But all these things offer only the illusion of control. How to live well, even joyously, while accepting our mortality -- that is the vitally important philosophical challenge of this book. Drawing on varied sources, from personal experience and sociological trends to pop culture and current scientific literature, NATURAL CAUSES examines the ways in which we obsess over death, our bodies, and our health. Both funny and caustic, Ehrenreich then tackles the seemingly unsolvable problem of how we might better prepare ourselves for the end -- while still reveling in the lives that remain to us.… (mer)
Medlem:freakorlando
Titel:Natural causes : an epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer
Författare:Barbara Ehrenreich
Info:New York : Twelve, 2018.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:****
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Natural Causes: An Epidemic of Wellness, the Certainty of Dying, and Killing Ourselves to Live Longer av Barbara Ehrenreich

Senast inlagd avBohdiCave, AngelBar, nonil, RFL-LIBRARY, privat bibliotek, MRMP, Phlegethon99, VeronicAPA, resoundingjoy

Ingen/inga.

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» Se även 26 omnämnanden

engelska (23)  spanska (2)  Alla språk (25)
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There's some great stuff in here, and I wanted to like this book more. Ultimately, though, it should have been called "Health: Some Things I Think About It."

I loved the idea that there may be parts of our body, our whole, that have free will themselves. She weaves science and philosophy to make us question the idea of 'self," and the idea that the universe, in general, is inert. There's a handful of other ideas in here that made me think, as well.

There's also a lot of arguement-for-arguement's sake. She takes a lot of things to task without explaining why she's critical or what her counter-point is. Similiarly, in many of her weaker arguments, she manages to show that *some* people support a bad idea, or that there is *some* evidence towards better ideas, all without convincing me that these are actually trends or widely held beliefs. ( )
  mitchtroutman | Jun 14, 2020 |
I enjoyed a good portion of it but the snarkiness and looking down the nose was irritating. There was more judgement than science and was grating to where I almost dropped out. I think I would have been more entertained had this been a web series on the topic where they were doled out in more article like sizes. ( )
  4Veritas | Jan 23, 2020 |
I enjoyed the perspectives and information presented within this book. The sections on the cellular basis of aging were a bit beyond me but I identified with the topics on medical tests, patient-doctor relationships and how to accept aging and dying. I have witnessed the slow decline of my parents and in-laws. I have seen the endless and merciless testing, probing and inconvenience they experienced. I do not want my final days to be like theirs...

Listed below are content from the book that caught my interest and provoked some thinking on my part:

The immune system actually abets the growth and spread of tumors, which is like saying that the fire department is indeed staffed by arsonists. We all know that the function of the immune system is to protect us, most commonly from bacteria and viruses, so it's expected response to cancer should be a concerted and militant defense.

You can think of death bed bitterly or with resignation, as a tragic interruption of your life, and take every possible measure to postpone it. Or, more realistically, you can think of life as an interruption of and eternity of personal nonexistence, and seize it as a brief opportunity to observe and interact with the living, ever surprising world around us.

Once I realized I was old enough to die, I decided that I was also old enough not to incur any more suffering, annoyance, or boredom in the pursuit of a longer life. As for medical care: I will see help for an urgent problem, but I am no longer interested in problems that remain undetectable to me.

Rather than being fearful of not detecting disease, both patients and doctors should fear healthcare. The best way to avoid medical errors is to avoid medical care. The default should be: I am well. Good way to stay that way is to keep making good choices – – not to have my doctor look for problems.

Not only do I reject the torment of a medicalized death, but I refuse to except a medicalized life, and my determination only deepens with age. As the time that remains to be shrinks, each month and day becomes too precious to spend in windowless waiting rooms and under the cold scrutiny of machines. Being old enough to die is an achievement, not a defeat, and the freedom it brings is worth celebrating.

One recent study found that almost half the man over 65 being treated for prostate cancer are unlikely to live long enough to get the disease anyway. They will, however, live long enough to suffer from the adverse consequences of their treatment.

The US Census Bureau reports that nearly 40% of people age 65 and older suffer from at least one disability, with 2/3 of them saying they have difficulty walking or climbing. ( )
  writemoves | Jun 17, 2019 |
Natural Causes
Barbara Ehrenreich
March 13, 2019
Subtitled "An epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer"
I read this book quickly, because the prose is very smooth, and easy to read. I had to return to it again to digest its philosophical and practical points, because it is really very dense with good ideas. The first part explores medical screening, concentrating on PAP smears and mammograms, and points out how invasive these are to women. The subsequent sections of the first half of the book deal with annual examinations, over diagnosis of marginal conditions like ADHD, and eventually about the fear of death.
The concept of "holism" "Everything - mind, body, and spirit, diet and attitude - is connected and must be brought into alignment for maximum effectiveness, whether to achieve "power" and "personal renewal" or just to lose a few pounds." Ehrenreich has a PhD in cell biology, and based on her studies of macrophages, she points out that the common condition of the body is a competition among cells, and even cooperation between cancer cells and macrophages to facilitate metastasis.
Ehrenreich is a sharp, incisive author, with a different perspective on medicine and medical rituals. I will subject some of my professional medical recommendations to greater scrutiny, and criticism. ( )
  neurodrew | Mar 17, 2019 |
Interesting subjects but at the end of the book i was wondering: "What is her point? What is this book about?". Maybe i was misled by the Dutch title of the book. ( )
  HendrikSteyaert | Feb 23, 2019 |
Visa 1-5 av 25 (nästa | visa alla)
“Natural Causes” is peevish, tender and deeply, distinctively odd — and often redeemed by its oddness. Ehrenreich is so offended by the American conflation of health with virtue and offers charming contrarian essays on the “defiant self-nurturance” of cigarette smoking, for example, and the dangers of eating fruit. The pleasures of her prose are often local, in the animated language, especially where scientific descriptions are concerned. Her description of cells rushing to staunch a wound is so full of wonder and delight that it recalls Italo Calvino.
tillagd av melmore | ändraNew York Times, Parul Sehgal (Apr 10, 2018)
 
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As a teenager, I aspired to be a scientist, but too many things happened to distract me from that goal, so I became instead a science appreciator.
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A New York Times bestseller! From the celebrated author of Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich explores how we are killing ourselves to live longer, not better. A razor-sharp polemic which offers an entirely new understanding of our bodies, ourselves, and our place in the universe, NATURAL CAUSES describes how we over-prepare and worry way too much about what is inevitable. One by one, Ehrenreich topples the shibboleths that guide our attempts to live a long, healthy life -- from the importance of preventive medical screenings to the concepts of wellness and mindfulness, from dietary fads to fitness culture. But NATURAL CAUSES goes deeper -- into the fundamental unreliability of our bodies and even our "mind-bodies," to use the fashionable term. Starting with the mysterious and seldom-acknowledged tendency of our own immune cells to promote deadly cancers, Ehrenreich looks into the cellular basis of aging, and shows how little control we actually have over it. We tend to believe we have agency over our bodies, our minds, and even over the manner of our deaths. But the latest science shows that the microscopic subunits of our bodies make their own "decisions," and not always in our favor. We may buy expensive anti-aging products or cosmetic surgery, get preventive screenings and eat more kale, or throw ourselves into meditation and spirituality. But all these things offer only the illusion of control. How to live well, even joyously, while accepting our mortality -- that is the vitally important philosophical challenge of this book. Drawing on varied sources, from personal experience and sociological trends to pop culture and current scientific literature, NATURAL CAUSES examines the ways in which we obsess over death, our bodies, and our health. Both funny and caustic, Ehrenreich then tackles the seemingly unsolvable problem of how we might better prepare ourselves for the end -- while still reveling in the lives that remain to us.

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