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Daemon Voices: On Stories and Storytelling…
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Daemon Voices: On Stories and Storytelling (utgåvan 2018)

av Philip Pullman (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
294466,395 (4.31)10
The author of the "His Dark Materials" trilogy shares insights into the art of writing while exploring how education, religion, and science, as well as his favorite classics, helped shaped his literary life. "From the internationally best-selling author of the His Dark Materials trilogy, a spellbinding journey into the secrets of his art--the narratives that shaped his vision, his experience of writing and understanding the magic of storytelling. Philip Pullman is one of our greatest storytellers--and in this collection of more than thirty essays written over twenty years, he meditates on storytelling. Warm, funny, generous, entertaining and above all, deeply considered, these essays offer thoughts on a variety of topics, including the origin and composition of Pullman's own stories, the craft of writing and the storytellers who have meant the most to him. The art of storytelling is everywhere present in the essays themselves, in the instantly engaging tone, the vivid imagery and striking phrases, the resonant anecdotes, the humor and learnedness. Together they are greater than the sum of their parts: a single, sustained engagement with stories and storytelling."--Dust jacket.… (mer)
Medlem:uscer
Titel:Daemon Voices: On Stories and Storytelling
Författare:Philip Pullman (Författare)
Info:Knopf (2018), Edition: Illustrated, 480 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:nonfiction, literature

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Daemon Voices: Essays on Storytelling av Philip Pullman (Author)

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Visar 3 av 3
Loved dipping into this. I decided to purchase if for a class I'm designing on human rights and speculative fiction (title TBA). Pullman is wonderfully insightful about the writer's world and art and the place of fantasy and children's stories in the "real" world. I'm a huge fan of his books, and this one is a very useful compilation of his non-fiction work on writing, fantasy, children's lit, science and religion. ( )
  MaximusStripus | Jul 7, 2020 |
Excellent collection of essays about writing, reading and critical study of literature
  emmsbookshelf | Feb 1, 2020 |
Got through ILL and read most essays - the first 400 pages. Will revisit when US edition is published September 2018.
*
Came back to it and finished in December 2018.

Quotes

From "Magic Carpets"
We should try always to use language to illuminate, reveal and clarify rather than obscure, mislead and conceal....The aim must always be clarity. (11)

From "The Writing of Stories"
[Quoting David Mamet] 'The main questions a director must answer are "Where do I put the camera?" and "What do I tell the actors?"' The actors question doesn't apply to novelists, of course, but we do have to think very hard about the other one: 'Where do I put the camera?' (28)

To my mind, the most rich, surprising, subtle and mysterious character in the whole of literature, surpassing in these qualities even Hamlet or Falstaff, is the narrator. (30)

From "Heinrich von Kleist: On the Marionette Theatre - Grace Lost and Regained"
Sometimes, by chance or fate or the workings of an inscrutable Providence, we meet exactly the right work of art at exactly the right time to have the maximum impact on us. (45)

Innocence at one end of the spectrum; wisdom at the other. But if we want the wisdom that comes with experience, we have to leave the innocence behind. (48)

From "Paradise Lost"
But landscapes and atmospheres aren't enough for a story; something has to happen. And it helps the tightness and propulsion of the story enormously if it's the protagonist himself who sets the action going, who takes the initiative. (58)

From "The Origin of the Universe"
But the stories that both religion and science tell us about our origins don't [tie up loose ends]. There isn't that sense of cadence and finality that we have at the end of a play or a novel, or the aesthetic and more closure we feel at the end of one of the classic fairy tales. Stories about origins don't have that sort of determined ending. (81)

From "Dreaming of Spires"
One of the pleasures of writing fiction is that you can sit at your desk and just make up what you are too lazy to go and find out. But sometimes I do stir myself to look for things, and when I find something interesting but irrelevant to my immediate purpose, I save it up for a later book, and invent a context to fit it. (109)

Fiction, of course, allows you to change things into other things as much as you like. (110)

From "Intention"
...I try to explain something about the democratic nature of reading. I say that whatever my intention might have been when I wrote the book, the meaning doesn't consist only of my intention. The meaning is what emerges from the interaction between the words I put on the page and the readers' own minds as they read them. (120)

From "Children's Literature Without Borders"
...I don't think it makes any sense for someone else to decide who should read this book or that. How can they possibly know? (129)

...if you're going to keep people listening, you need to know your story very well...[the story] goes in a line from one event to the next, and in a good telling those events will be in the most effective order and follow swiftly and cleanly one after another; everything that's important will be there, and everything that's irrelevant will be left out. (133)

From "Let's Write It In Red"
[Rules of writing]
Whatever doesn't add, subtracts...
...the three laws of the Quest: the protagonist's task must be hard to do, it must be easy to understand, and a great deal must hang on the outcome... (148)

From "The Classical Tone"
The narrator is a very unusual character...only manifest as that disembodied voice. I believe that the narrator is not actually a human character at all, and his or her relationship to time is one of the ways in which his or her uncanny inhumanness is manifest.
Think what the narrator can do. He or she can flit between one mind and another...Human beings can't do that. He or she can dart backwards and forwards along the stream of time like a kingfisher... (246)

...the character we see first is the one to whom we feel the story belongs, in some way. (253)

From "Reading in the Borderland"
The Borderland, the land along the frontier, is the space that opens up between the private mind of the reader and the book they're reading. It'll be different for every individual, because while parts of the borderland belong to the book, other parts only belong to that particular reader - to us: our own memories, the associations we have with this or that particular word or landscape, the aspects that resonate with our own individual temperament; so whereas many readers might be reading the same book, no two of them will read it in exactly the same way. (259)

From "Imaginary Friends"
And in the sort of private, secret, inviolable space that opened out miraculously between the printed page and my young mind, that sort of thing happened all the time. It's the state of mind in which you can hear the voice of your daemon. In fact, there are probably daemon voices whispering to us all the time, and we've forgotten how to hear them. (310)

*

December 2018

From "Talents and Virtues"
I think we can learn what's good and what's bad, what's generous and unselfish, what's cruel and mean, from fiction. (378)

...what I mean by the school of morals...it's the assumption that stories, in whatever form they come - drama, the novel, fairy tales, films - show us human beings like ourselves acting in recognisably human ways, and they affect our emotions and our intelligence as life itself affects us; that the stories we call the greatest are great because they are most like life, and the ones we think not so good are correspondingly less so....and our moral understanding is deepened and enriched by the awakening of our imaginative sympathy. (386)

Just look at a flower dying for lack of water, and then water it; it's like that. (393)

I think we should act as if.
I think we should read books, and tell children stories, and take them to the theatre, and learn poems, and play music, as if it would make a difference....We should act as if the universe were listening to us and responding; we should act as if life were going to win. (394)

From "God and Dust"
So it sets up a new kind of relationship between us and God - mutually dependent instead of being hierarchical. He didn't create us; we create each other. (408)

"Good people have done good things, and evil people have done evil things, without the help of religion; but for good people to do evil - that takes religion." (Steven Weinberg) (411)

From "The Republic of Heaven"

There are two kinds of Why, and a myth must deal with both. There's the one that asks What brought us here? and the other that asks What is our purpose? One looks back, and the other looks forward, perhaps. (428-429)

We are conscious, and conscious of our own consciousness. We might have arrived at this point by a series of accidents, but from now on we have to take charge of our fate. Now we are here, now we are conscious, we make a difference. Our presence changes everything. (429) ( )
  JennyArch | Apr 24, 2018 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Pullman, PhilipFörfattareprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Lawrence, JohnIllustratörmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Mason, SimonRedaktörmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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The author of the "His Dark Materials" trilogy shares insights into the art of writing while exploring how education, religion, and science, as well as his favorite classics, helped shaped his literary life. "From the internationally best-selling author of the His Dark Materials trilogy, a spellbinding journey into the secrets of his art--the narratives that shaped his vision, his experience of writing and understanding the magic of storytelling. Philip Pullman is one of our greatest storytellers--and in this collection of more than thirty essays written over twenty years, he meditates on storytelling. Warm, funny, generous, entertaining and above all, deeply considered, these essays offer thoughts on a variety of topics, including the origin and composition of Pullman's own stories, the craft of writing and the storytellers who have meant the most to him. The art of storytelling is everywhere present in the essays themselves, in the instantly engaging tone, the vivid imagery and striking phrases, the resonant anecdotes, the humor and learnedness. Together they are greater than the sum of their parts: a single, sustained engagement with stories and storytelling."--Dust jacket.

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