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Dying Inside av Robert Silverberg
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Dying Inside (urspr publ 1972; utgåvan 2002)

av Robert Silverberg (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,3063610,693 (3.73)54
Science fiction. From birth David Selig was both blessed and cursed with the ability to look into the innermost thoughts and hearts of people around him. As he grew he learnt to protect himself from the things he did not want to hear and eavesdropped on all that he did, using his powers for the pursuit of pleasure. But now having reached middle-age, David's powers are fading, slowly stranding him in a world he does not know how to handle, leaving him living on the outside but dying inside. Universally acclaimed as Silverberg's masterpiece, this is the harrowing and chilling story of a man who squandered his remarkable powers and then had to learn what it was like to be human.… (mer)
Medlem:atomoton
Titel:Dying Inside
Författare:Robert Silverberg (Författare)
Info:I Books (2002), 256 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:****
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Dying Inside av Robert Silverberg (1972)

Senast inlagd avunkilbeeg, szarka, unsquare, IanPercival, privat bibliotek
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» Se även 54 omnämnanden

engelska (33)  franska (2)  spanska (1)  Alla språk (36)
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Eavesdropping pervert
wasting his gift, and his life
still, I sympathize. ( )
1 rösta Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
f you are a writer, there is a sadness in completing a masterful work. It is that surety, the cold knowledge that you will never write anything so important, or so simply. That is my unfiltered reaction to having completed Dying Inside. Silverberg filled his book with an absolutely miserable, self-pitying, abhorrent human being. He did little but wander through his current and dim past life, showing us his wallowing failures at holding normal relationships with people.

He has a “gift,” does David Selig, one that makes him — as he considers himself to be — a Superman. However, as we watch his life, and especially as his gift begins to fail him, and disappear, we become aware, as he never does, that it is not a gift. He can read minds, as only a few others can. But it does him no good. He squanders the gift, which oddly, isolates him from society. He doesn’t need to interact, he can “learn” them without their input. There are one or two others with the gift, and they fare slightly better, but it is still pointless.

So, I read about David, the whiny, wheedling, racist, protagonist, and secretly rooted for him to die. He does not, and I’m not certain he ever becomes likable, but I couldn’t help but enjoy the book. Silverberg’s prose is a masterful mix of simplicity and lyricism. And though we don’t like David or anyone in his world — there isn’t a single likable character in the book — we are drawn in by Silverberg’s storytelling enough not to care.

We read the book, not because we care about the character, but because we care about the book. And that, my friends, is a masterwork. ( )
1 rösta billjonesjr | Jun 24, 2020 |
Strangely enough, I found this one a real treat to read. It might have something to do with the fact that I read [b:A Time of Changes|1706646|A Time of Changes |Robert Silverberg|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1264969026s/1706646.jpg|1011356], [b:The World Inside|261625|The World Inside|Robert Silverberg|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1387347151s/261625.jpg|253589], and it all within the same day, somewhat in spirit of how damn quick Silverberg wrote these great classics. :)

And because I read them all back to back, I found that being this familiar with the artist's text made al three books flow like water, common themes kissing intimately and oh so sexually. Like connection. Basic human connection. The first novel revelled in the breaking down of the barriers of self. The second novel, for all it's permissive sex, alienated everyone from deep and meaningful interactions. And then, the the third, David Selig, a powerful telepath living in the Baby Boomer generation here on earth, even with the gift to break through, could never quite make the bridge of intimacy.

Is it a tragedy? Yes. He squanders his talents as a kid and loses his ability as he ages, getting more frantic with time, and yet it's still the question of intimacy that each little vignette keeps coming back to. The novel's scenes jump through time, circling and circling back to peck at this theme, diving deeper into the the problem of telepathy, of squandered gifts, and all the while, we as readers are treated to an honestly delightful and revealing look, so I assume, into Robert Silverberg, himself.

I say this because David Selig is absolutely rich with humanity, being funny, flawed, intensely sexual (I think there *might* be a theme here), unabashedly intellectual, lazy, drug exploratory, and an all-around *real* guy. He's just as fucked as the rest of us, and there's so many things that ground him in the text, so many stream of consciousness moments, and so many insightful reflections, that I couldn't help being utterly, confoundedly, impressed.

It'd be awesome even as a traditional fiction tale, utterly mainstream, but it just so happens to have telepathy. In today's market, this one would probably do very well and no one would blink twice. There's much worse blurring of the lines out there.

Yeah. I'm looking at you, David Mitchell.

For those of you looking for one of those true classics of the SF field, who want a taste without truly wanting to commit to a learning curve, you could do much worse than read this one. It might as well be a novel about a man's descent into sexual impotency, of the rage and fear and embarrassment and loss of connection and identity. It's just that clever, that deep, and that good.

Nominated for '73 Hugo, right on the heels of the other two novels, both of which were nominated for the '72 hugos, both in the same year. Does anyone think that Silverberg was out to prove something during this time frame? Hmmm? The fact that he managed to be so prolific and write such good stuff should be a testament of anyone's real talent, and my hat goes off to him! Bravo! ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
I liked the idea of this novel more than the actual execution. A man who’s spent his life with an essential cheat sheet to human interaction suddenly being on the same footing as everyone else? Sounds amazing. Sadly I didn’t actually enjoy this all that much.

I didn’t mind that the main character was unlikable. I didn’t mind that he was racist, sexist and morose. What I did mind was that he was boring. So, so boring. Having no real plot to your novel is fine if the characters are interesting to read about. But no plot and boring characters? It’s like every bad stereotype of the Lit Fic genre and not a book I’d recommend.
( )
  Fardo | Oct 15, 2019 |
Seems diminishing to describe this quite remarkable novel only in relation to its mainstream analogues. But they're there -- and they're far enough in distance, with their reputation firm and matured, to quite clearly be an influence upon and model for many aspects of what Silverberg's doing here. Namely, I would say, Roth [P's Complaint to be exact] and Bellow's Herzog. I mean, a substantial part of this is Selig dictating droves of unsent letters to acquaintances and famous people alike, alive and dead. Nonetheless, even given those non-sf antecedents, this is still quite the achievement -- achieving an aesthetic effect and emotional resonance quite unlike most any other sf [long or short] I've read. Even, I could say, achieving an effect I might have previously thought impossible in the medium [and not as a detriment, but solely as a function of how different genres operate]. AND, what is actually more impressive, the sf element here is NOT, as one might assume with a book doing what this book does, ancillary to that effect, but directly responsible for it! Basically, the criterion I require for exceptional speculative stuff. In some respects -- and again, this is one of the work's amazing elements [as it's more often than not the reverse, even in good speculative stuff] -- Dying Inside succeeds in discrete chunks more than it does cumulatively [one gets the sense that Silverberg understood what kind of work he was writing and thereby understood what kind of ending he needed to write, but still didn't exactly know how to tack on meaning nonetheless to a "meaningless" ending, as some litfic authors are more practiced at], meaning that the little section pieces work in and of themselves [I'm thinking of several early and middle scenes with his sister Jude (his immediate takedown of Guermantes in front of her ["He's a monster"]) and his breakup with Toni (reading her gay friend's mind, seeing them lying naked together and him trying his damndest to have sex with her as comfort and them failing but still feeling quite a bit of love and comfort between them -- really a moving scene, AND one in which the speculative element is required for its effect)]. Otherwise, I think I also felt especially predisposed to getting what this was giving after finishing A SEPARATION recently and really really souring on it even more in the meantime. Such a dead book. And to come to this immediately after -- something overflowing with life and experience, something so unapologetically itself, something so rudely of its time -- in which a smart reader understands the actual and tangible divisions between Selig's sexism [obsessive objectivisation, z.B.] and Silverberg's sexism [the inability to think of his female characters outside of his mind], Selig's racism [his inability to see the obvious bigotry in adopting jive talk for Yahya's paper] and Silverberg's racism [the announcing of every black entrance, the assumption of omnipresent Black Power and you-dumb-honky-ness], etc. etc. It all just works. ( )
1 rösta Ebenmaessiger | Oct 5, 2019 |
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» Lägg till fler författare (2 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Robert Silverbergprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Abadia, GuyÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Alpers, Hans JoachimRedaktörmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Erlich, Richard D.Inledningmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Freas, Frank KellyOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Harman, DominicOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Korusiewicz, MariaÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Rodríguez, CarlosÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Stege, GiselaÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
White, TimOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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Science fiction. From birth David Selig was both blessed and cursed with the ability to look into the innermost thoughts and hearts of people around him. As he grew he learnt to protect himself from the things he did not want to hear and eavesdropped on all that he did, using his powers for the pursuit of pleasure. But now having reached middle-age, David's powers are fading, slowly stranding him in a world he does not know how to handle, leaving him living on the outside but dying inside. Universally acclaimed as Silverberg's masterpiece, this is the harrowing and chilling story of a man who squandered his remarkable powers and then had to learn what it was like to be human.

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