HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My…
Laddar...

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery (urspr publ 2018; utgåvan 2018)

av Barbara K. Lipska Ph. D (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
16713127,337 (3.57)23
"As a deadly cancer spread inside her brain, leading neuroscientist Barbara Lipska was plunged into madness--only to miraculously survive with her memories intact. In the tradition of My Stroke of Insight and Brain on Fire, this powerful memoir recounts her ordeal and explains its unforgettablelessons about the brain and mind. In January 2015, Barbara Lipska--a leading expert on the neuroscience of mental illness--was diagnosed with melanoma that had spread to her brain. Within months, her frontal lobe, the seat of cognition, began shutting down. She descended intomadness, exhibiting dementia- and schizophrenia-like symptoms that terrified her family and coworkers. But miraculously, just as her doctors figured out what was happening, the immunotherapy they had prescribed began to work. Just eight weeks after her nightmare began, Lipska returned to normal. With one difference: she remembered her brush with madness with exquisite clarity. In The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Lipska describes her extraordinary ordeal and its lessons about the mind and brain. She explains how mental illness, brain injury, and age can change our behavior, personality, cognition, and memory. She tells what it is like to experience these changes firsthand. And she reveals what parts of us remain, evenwhen so much else is gone"--… (mer)
Medlem:DrBibliophile
Titel:The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery
Författare:Barbara K. Lipska Ph. D (Författare)
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2018), 208 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery av Barbara K. Lipska Ph. D (2018)

Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 23 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 13 (nästa | visa alla)
This is a story about a woman and her family who went through hell and back, also know as cancer. She is a survivor. She is a mother, sister, wife, daughter, grandmother, scientist and researcher are a few more of her titles. This is not an easy story to read, but it gives hope and information about what it is like to be in that mind, to lose it and work on regaining it back. ( )
  RavinScarface | Dec 13, 2020 |
Barbara Lipska is a remarkable scientist with an appalling story that's ultimately inspiring. Within the decade, she survived breast cancer and thereafter a melanoma on her neck. Despite debilitating treatments, she continued to work. Too, she kept fit by running (marathons), cycling, and swimming; in her early 60s, she was preparing to compete in an ironman triathlon.

On the cusp of important scientific confab at a resort in Montana in 2015, she experienced vision impairment and an MRI revealed three tumors on her brain, one of which was bleeding. A brain tumor that bleeds is usually melanoma, and melanoma in the brain is usually a death sentence.

What followed for Dr. Lipska and her family was an often dispiriting trek through a labyrinth of clinics, medical offices, and hospitals, and prognostication sessions with her family doctor, an ophthalmologist, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists. She consulted doctors in Washington, then in Boston, where her sister Maria is a physicist in the oncologic radiation department of Brigham and Women's Hospital. In Washington, the doctors were intent on doing radiation treatments, followed by surgery. The Boston doctors favored surgery first, with radiation after. She chose the latter sequence, and when surgery removed the bleeding tumor, the vision impairment disappeared. She was accepted into an immunotherapy trial; that trial concluded, follow-up MRIs showed new tumors and significant brain swelling.

An alarming aspect of her illness manifested itself to her family and co-workers though she remained unaware of it. She became testy, angry, hypercritical, demanding. Small issues obsessed her; she'd complain about them for days. She got lost in familiar environments (her own neighborhood, for example) and forgot how to do everyday tasks, like using her cell phone. These are symptoms of mental illnesses.

Here's the twist: Dr. Barbara Lipska is in charge of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health, and has spent her professional career studying the relationships between brain tissue and mental illness. Ironically, her tumors and treatments to eradicate them were pushing her into madness. Those around her were acutely aware of the symptoms; she herself was not.

An excellent book. Both thumbs up!
  weird_O | Feb 6, 2020 |
This was not the same inspirational cancer survival experience as "A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer" by Mary Elizabeth Williams. The author, who studied brains at the National Institute of Mental Health, had a much less emotional style. She presented information about the brain and cancer which added to my enjoyment of the book, but I was not enthralled. It was amazing to hear how she continued exercising and working throughout her illness and treatment. However, I couldn't believe that her family didn't intervene at some stage. ( )
  terran | Dec 30, 2019 |
I made short work of this one. Was totally absorbed in her story. I find anything to do with the mind fascinating. It can be our best friend or our worst enemy. Yet, so little is known about this miraculous organ, the control center of what makes us who we are. The author is the head of the NIH, studying the brains of those with mental deficits, among them schitzophrenia. She had besten cancer twice, was an avid marathon and triathlon partcipant, when she found out she had a melanoma that had spread to her brain. Despite the many years studying the brains, she didn't recognize her own symptoms, but she was in for the fight of her life.

The impact on her family was costly. The disease making her a completely different person. This is her story, and it is written in a no nonscence but honest manner. Her descriptions of how the brain works, and how hers was not, was told in a way that was easy to understand. Her treatments and trials, informative. A very interesting, and quite in spring memoir. ( )
  Beamis12 | Jan 14, 2019 |
Lately I've been thinking about how much I enjoy medical histories/thrillers/memoirs, and why don't I read them more often? So when I spied this at the library when I took the kids to stock up on books for summer, of course it went on the pile.

And I did really enjoy this. Even as I was disturbed by it and its implications for free will and perceived reality. We are our brains, and if we cannot say or know when something is wrong with them, then how can we as individuals or as a society fix them? The implications are staggering and can go on forever -- should Lipska been allowed to make such profound decisions for herself when she was clearly not herself? But if she wasn't herself, who was she? And if she couldn't decide, who could?

And what would be the chances for survival and recovery for someone who wasn't a neuroscientist, living near D.C. with doctors and medical physicists in her family? And how should we treat people who cannot process reality in the same way that we can?

The questions that this book brings up are challenging and so very interesting. A fascinating story, well-told, even if I would have appreciated the timeline conveyed a little more clearly. ( )
1 rösta greeniezona | Dec 3, 2018 |
Visa 1-5 av 13 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

"As a deadly cancer spread inside her brain, leading neuroscientist Barbara Lipska was plunged into madness--only to miraculously survive with her memories intact. In the tradition of My Stroke of Insight and Brain on Fire, this powerful memoir recounts her ordeal and explains its unforgettablelessons about the brain and mind. In January 2015, Barbara Lipska--a leading expert on the neuroscience of mental illness--was diagnosed with melanoma that had spread to her brain. Within months, her frontal lobe, the seat of cognition, began shutting down. She descended intomadness, exhibiting dementia- and schizophrenia-like symptoms that terrified her family and coworkers. But miraculously, just as her doctors figured out what was happening, the immunotherapy they had prescribed began to work. Just eight weeks after her nightmare began, Lipska returned to normal. With one difference: she remembered her brush with madness with exquisite clarity. In The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Lipska describes her extraordinary ordeal and its lessons about the mind and brain. She explains how mental illness, brain injury, and age can change our behavior, personality, cognition, and memory. She tells what it is like to experience these changes firsthand. And she reveals what parts of us remain, evenwhen so much else is gone"--

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.57)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 11
3.5 1
4 12
4.5 1
5 3

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 160,649,725 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig