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Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a…
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Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World (utgåvan 2018)

av Maryanne Wolf (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
3321260,043 (3.85)8
Wolf considers the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy and reflection as we become increasingly dependent upon digital technologies.A decade ago, Wolf's Proust and the Squid revealed what we know about how the brain learns to read and how reading changes the way we think and feel. Now that we are completely immersed in the internet and digital devices, our ways of processing language have altered dramatically. In a series of letters, Wolf describes her hopes and concerns about what is happening to the brain as it adapts to digital mediums, illuminating complex ideas with anecdotes and down-to-earth examples. Wolf considers the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy and reflection as we become increasingly dependent upon digital technologies.… (mer)
Medlem:RonKnudsen
Titel:Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World
Författare:Maryanne Wolf (Författare)
Info:Harper (2018), 272 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World av Maryanne Wolf

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In her 2018 book “Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World,” Maryanne Wolf cites a number of scientific studies indicating that while people may be reading more each day on their smartphones and computers than ever before, their ability to comprehend what they're reading has decreased. They can't stay focused on one thing for long. Their reading usually involves a lot of skimming and skipping, not concentration on a single subject.

Yet what really convinced Wolf was when she tried to reread Hermann Hesse's “Magister Ludi,” a novel she had loved when she was in college. Now she found it difficult to focus her attention on it for more than a page or two at a time. "The rapid speed to which I had become accustomed while reading my daily gigabytes of material did not allow me to slow down enough to grasp whatever Hesse was conveying," she writes.

If Wolf, an authority on reading and former director of the Tufts Center for Reading and Language Research, finds this to be true, imagine how true it must be for the rest of us, and especially for children who spend much of their day on computers, even while in the classroom.

Children and their education are major concerns of Wolf, who is also an expert on dyslexia. She is a big believer in reading to children, including those too young to actually understand what is being read to them. She is enough of a realist to know that turning back the clock on the digital age is not possible, but she does advocate for exploring ways to use computers to increase, rather than decrease, attention spans.

The implications of this dumbing down of readers of all ages are vast. "Sometimes we outsource our intelligence to the information outlets that offer the fastest, simplest, most digestible distillations of information we no longer want to think about ourselves," she says. It was once thought that the Internet would make possible an even greater diversity of thought and ideas, yet as sites such as Google, Facebook and YouTube have become more powerful and have begun to censor ideas they disapprove of, the opposite has become true. Those incapable of seeking truth on their own could become sheep easily led. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Sep 23, 2020 |
I picked up this book expecting an exploration of the neuroscience and physiology of the effects of reading on the brain, and how reading in print and digital formats differ. I got that, and so much more.

Wolf presents a balanced account of the different effects of different mediums, both negative and positive, and how we might use this knowledge to do better for our children and ourselves. It's a welcome perspective.

It's also a deeply humanist and moral meditation of the capacities of the human mind and the importance of storytelling. It's a clarion call to fulfill the responsibility we all bear toward our fellow human beings and to the future. This is a work of tremendous empathy and passion.

It may well be one of the most important works of our age. ( )
  johnthelibrarian | Aug 11, 2020 |
"It would be a shame if brilliant technology were to end up threatening the kind of intellect that produced it." - Edward Tenner

I think I was expecting an argument similar to 2010's The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains. Which is to say I was expecting a lot of finger wagging and bemoaning of how this new digital world is just terrible. But while Shallows feels overly luddite-ish, Maryanne Wolf's Reader, Come Home seems more intent on adapting to the future rather than fighting it. There's more of a "Let's figure this out" approach going on here.

The Edward Tenner quote above sums it up well. Humanity's collective brilliance built this wonderous, breathtaking modern world, but we now risk undermining ourselves. Reader, Come Home is, on its surface, about the reading brain and the challenges posed, but the book's broader message is about the potential dangers of our technological innovations, especially if left unchecked. We risk getting swallowed by our own good intentions.

Reader, Come Home is a candle, a way forward. We can have the best of all futures if we want, but not if we're thoughtless about who we want to be. ( )
  Daniel.Estes | Jul 17, 2020 |
I would have thought this book would have a great cheering section at LibraryThing. Prowling around online reviews I found that most of the critical ones seemed to either shoot wide of the author's point or actually establish it while defying it. For example, one critical review took the author to task for having an old (10 ancient years out-of-date) view of social media, because now through Twitter and Facebook we are having interactive, deep conversations. Yes, well... I found the book fascinating, and think it makes a very important point. It does take a fairly sharp turn into pedagogy, and that was not really my interest. I was most interested in the act of reading and the broader sociological discussion about what shallower reading is doing to us as a civilization. There are easier books to read, but I would recommend this one highly and I'm very glad this author is on the job. ( )
1 rösta rsairs | Jul 7, 2020 |
I burned through this in less than a week in January, and maybe I should have spent more time with it, because the author is advocating for the importance of deeper, critical reading of the content before us. I still got a bit of insight into how a brain scientist would diagnose our modern information consumption, and it was nice to hear that not all we are doing in that realm is wrong. ( )
  jonerthon | Jun 5, 2020 |
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Wolf considers the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy and reflection as we become increasingly dependent upon digital technologies.A decade ago, Wolf's Proust and the Squid revealed what we know about how the brain learns to read and how reading changes the way we think and feel. Now that we are completely immersed in the internet and digital devices, our ways of processing language have altered dramatically. In a series of letters, Wolf describes her hopes and concerns about what is happening to the brain as it adapts to digital mediums, illuminating complex ideas with anecdotes and down-to-earth examples. Wolf considers the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy and reflection as we become increasingly dependent upon digital technologies.

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