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The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the…
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The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table with My Heroes (utgåvan 2018)

av Rick Bass (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
454435,758 (4.06)Ingen/inga
On the Road meets Tuesdays with Morrie in this pilgrimage by "an American classic" (Newsweek) to thank his most important mentors through memorable meals and conversations "Some years later, George Plimpton offered to punch me in the nose," recounts Rick Bass, remembering fondly a conversation with the famed Paris Review editor in his office, in which Plimpton, who had been slugged by Archie Moore, offered to connect Bass to a "hoary genealogy" that would include Ali and Frazier. Lineage has always been important to Bass. Before the punch-that-could-have-been, there was his failed bid to become Eudora Welty's lawn boy, and his first meal with Jim Harrison, during which he could barely bring himself to speak. That supper would eventually inspire this book, Rick's years-long pilgrimage to thank his heroes, and to pass on their legacy of mentorship to the next generation. The poignancy of this journey of thanksgiving is intensified by the place in life at which Bass finds himself. He is nearing sixty, his daughters are now grown, and his wife of more than two decades, who accompanied him on that long-ago dinner with Jim Harrison, has called an end to their marriage. In the wake of this loss, Bass sets out, accompanied by two young writers, to recapture the fire, the hunger, that has faded from his life. The Traveling Feast is a book about meeting one's debts in two directions--sending gratitude to the old exemplars, and a few contemporaries, from Peter Matthiessen to David Sedaris and John Berger to Lorrie Moore, while paying it forward to the next generation of writers, believing in and supporting them as Bass was by his own heroes. Each chapter in this fruitful journey recalls the meeting, the meal, and the history--the writer of the past and of the now. From the disastrous pecan tart to the illegally transported elk meat to the photo op gone awry are many resonant moments. What emerges is a guide not only to writing well but to living well, to sucking out all the marrow of life, in Thoreau's immortal phrase. The Traveling Feast is a chronicling of the old ways, a cross-continent pilgrimage to show gratitude for a legacy of American literature and the writers who made it.… (mer)
Medlem:Lynchburg4books
Titel:The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table with My Heroes
Författare:Rick Bass (Författare)
Info:Little, Brown and Company (2018), 288 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:nonfiction

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The Traveling Feast: On the Road and At the Table With America's Finest Writers av Rick Bass

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Visar 4 av 4
Finished some time ago, but I believe it was in 2020. These are amazing and hit all my high notes - Peter Matthiessen, Doug Peacock, Gary Snyder, Barry Lopez. Just missing Jim Harrison, who died too soon to be included. Time under girds the entire project, as does blood seeping through a baggy in customs. ( )
  kcshankd | May 28, 2020 |
ESSAYS/WRITING
Rick Bass
The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table with My Heroes
Little, Brown and Company
Hardcover, 978-0-3163-8123-9 (also available as an ebook and an audiobook), 288 pgs., $28.00
June 5, 2018

A soul-examining pilgrimage of the search for lessons in moving gracefully, maybe even joyfully, from middle-age into later years, The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table with My Heroes is the new collection of essays from Rick Bass that will make you hungry for all things that nourish. The Traveling Feast is part memoir, part lessons in craft, part naturalist activism, part cookbook, part travelogue, part recommended-reading list, and wholly a feast of language. As we prepare for our feasts this week, Bass’s new collection is art to be thankful for.

Bass, born and raised in Texas, began his career as a petroleum geologist in Mississippi, spending his lunch hours and spare time writing and haunting the state’s famous bookstores. The author of thirty books, Bass won the Story Prize for his collection For a Little While and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for his memoir Why I Came West. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Esquire, and The Paris Review (his first acceptance!), among many other publications, has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories, won multiple O. Henry Awards and Pushcart Prizes, as well as NEA and Guggenheim fellowships. Bass left Mississippi for Montana’s remote Yaak Valley where he has lived for thirty years and where he is a founding board member of the Yaak Valley Forest Council.

The essays included in The Traveling Feast, with sixteen chapters each devoted to an individual writer, including Peter Matthiessen (RIP), Amy Hempel, Denis Johnson (RIP), and Terry Tempest Williams, who has been an inspiration and mentor to Bass in his work and how to live a meaningful life. Chapter titles include “Russell Chatham, the Painter, Recently Hospitalized, Emerges from Seven-Figure Debt and Alcoholism, Ready to Paint,” “Lorrie Moore, Fairy Godmother: The Road to the Corn Palace; or, the Trail of Ears,” and “Joyce Carol Oates, Badass.”

The Traveling Feast is suffused with the author’s self-deprecating, wry wit, such as the time Bass attempted to become Eudora Welty’s yardman just so he could breathe the same air. Sometimes it’s laugh-aloud hilarious, as when the frozen elk Bass was smuggling into Heathrow began to thaw and left a trail of blood down the concourse.

There are no ten-dollar words in this collection but the prose is not simple; it simply rings true in a stripped-down aesthetic that reminds me of Raymond Carver, who is a presence in these pages. Simultaneously, The Traveling Feast is profoundly personal, Bass’s feelings raw and on the surface, working through the possibilities for the remainder of his years after a devastating divorce (“There can be something even more sorrowful than ghosts, which is the separation of the living.”) has left him mired in doubt and melancholia, casting about for comfort and catalyst.

This is where Bass’s heroes come in. In a quest for sustenance and restoration, he decided to take a break from writing to travel the country (and in a couple of cases, Europe) to visit writers who shaped him and his work. Bass took along a select few of his most promising workshop students and together they created wonderful meals (soup of fresh-dug parsnips with tarragon, butter, garlic, and vermouth; balsamic-and-fig glaze for the quail; jalapeño potato gratin with sweet potatoes, cream, garlic, and sage; ginger chocolate cake with buttermilk, applesauce, vanilla, and cinnamon) for his heroes, forging human connections through the timeless ritual of breaking bread together. Bass seeks wisdom from those writers who were “around at my beginning” and needs reassurance and inspiration from “the sight, the proof, that in the greats this fire is never extinguished.”

Bass is painfully honest about himself, writing that “shy men [and] women cannot live among people, nor should they try.” This is where the remoteness of Montana wilderness enters the picture.

“When you are shy like this,” he continues, “you want to come closer but cannot bear to bring yourself in. When you are a million miles out … you’re free to just to stand there and watch, and things that are ordinary to everyone else seem to your shy mind … beautiful. You feel like falling over on your back, upturned, like a turtle.”

Is there a better simile than that turtle? I think not.

Bass can make you blissfully drunk on language, contemplating how twenty-six letters can be arranged in such a way that both inspires and humbles, leaving you staring at the wall or into the middle distance, turning a phrase over and over again like a river rock to discover each contour while knowing with utter certainty that you’re going to overlook something in haste for the next treasure.

“Because I knew Denis [Johnson] to be a genius with his sentences and perceptions, I imagined he might not be wise that way with the rest of his life and with the allocations of his heart. But as with the best of meals, were fed what we needed, and strengthened.”

Happy Thanksgiving, y’all.

Originally published in Lone Star Literary Life. ( )
  TexasBookLover | Nov 19, 2018 |
I love travel books and books that I can learn from, and The Traveling Feast combined both. This book was full of different home cooked foods, funny escapades and people, writers who are the author’s mentors We almost meet Eudora Welty, almost read about George Plimpton punching Rick in the nose and want to give him a rag to pick up that blood at the airport. ( )
  Mary_Ann_Janicki | Aug 7, 2018 |
3.5 Food, Books and authors, how could I not grab this to read? Loved the premise, Rick Bass, as a homage to his favorite authors, some friends, some mentors in his own career, by visiting and cooking them s meal. Accompanying him are a few young writer he himself is mentoring, and sometimes by his own grown daughter with writing ambitions. Along the way we learn a little something about his own career, and his own life.

Some of the authors he visits are the late and great Peter Matthiessen, who I need to read more of, as well as David Sedaris, Denis Johnson, now also gone and many others. He cooks them some fantastic sounding meals, some debacles along the way, and we learn some about the way they live and write. Loved when he visited Joyce Carol Oates, quite a spunky lady as well as a prolific author. Bit of a faux pas was committed at that dinner which she called them out on. As always, when reading a book like this I have added even more books to my read list, almost impossible not to do so. A very enjoyable, informative read, with some great deals and descriptive scenery along the way. ( )
  Beamis12 | Jun 21, 2018 |
Visar 4 av 4
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On the Road meets Tuesdays with Morrie in this pilgrimage by "an American classic" (Newsweek) to thank his most important mentors through memorable meals and conversations "Some years later, George Plimpton offered to punch me in the nose," recounts Rick Bass, remembering fondly a conversation with the famed Paris Review editor in his office, in which Plimpton, who had been slugged by Archie Moore, offered to connect Bass to a "hoary genealogy" that would include Ali and Frazier. Lineage has always been important to Bass. Before the punch-that-could-have-been, there was his failed bid to become Eudora Welty's lawn boy, and his first meal with Jim Harrison, during which he could barely bring himself to speak. That supper would eventually inspire this book, Rick's years-long pilgrimage to thank his heroes, and to pass on their legacy of mentorship to the next generation. The poignancy of this journey of thanksgiving is intensified by the place in life at which Bass finds himself. He is nearing sixty, his daughters are now grown, and his wife of more than two decades, who accompanied him on that long-ago dinner with Jim Harrison, has called an end to their marriage. In the wake of this loss, Bass sets out, accompanied by two young writers, to recapture the fire, the hunger, that has faded from his life. The Traveling Feast is a book about meeting one's debts in two directions--sending gratitude to the old exemplars, and a few contemporaries, from Peter Matthiessen to David Sedaris and John Berger to Lorrie Moore, while paying it forward to the next generation of writers, believing in and supporting them as Bass was by his own heroes. Each chapter in this fruitful journey recalls the meeting, the meal, and the history--the writer of the past and of the now. From the disastrous pecan tart to the illegally transported elk meat to the photo op gone awry are many resonant moments. What emerges is a guide not only to writing well but to living well, to sucking out all the marrow of life, in Thoreau's immortal phrase. The Traveling Feast is a chronicling of the old ways, a cross-continent pilgrimage to show gratitude for a legacy of American literature and the writers who made it.

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