HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

Eighteenth-century manners of reading : print culture and popular…

av Eve Tavor Bannet

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
3Ingen/inga3,398,407Ingen/ingaIngen/inga
The market for print steadily expanded throughout the eighteenth-century Atlantic world thanks to printers' efforts  to ensure that ordinary people knew how to read and use printed matter. Reading is and was a collection of practices, performed in diverse, but always very specific ways. These practices were spread down the social hierarchy through printed guides. Eve Tavor Bannet explores guides to six manners or methods of reading, each with its own social, economic, commercial, intellectual and pedagogical functions, and each promoting a variety of fragmentary and discontinuous reading practices. The increasingly widespread production of periodicals, pamphlets, prefaces, conduct books, conversation-pieces and fictions, together with schoolbooks designed for adults and children, disseminated all that people of all ages and ranks might need or wish to know about reading, and prepared them for new jobs and roles both in Britain and America.… (mer)
Senast inlagd avfaktorovich

Inga taggar

Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

Inga recensioner
This topic interested me because I previously wrote a book on author-publishers that focused heavily on eighteenth-century Britain. The spread of literacy from this century and into the following century was connected with the spread of libraries and public schools; meanwhile, the price of purchasing thicker books remained prohibitively high even for the middle class. Thus, even as people became literate, they had access to so few books that their comprehension level of more complex texts remained low, while there was pressure for them to report that they understood these highbrow works to sell themselves as cultured intellectuals, thus gaining access to high ranks of society. Thus, understanding reading and publishing reveals cultural patterns about life in this period that are otherwise obscure. Literacy and reading is perhaps a bigger problem in our modern world as students spend astronomically prohibitive amounts on their college education, despite the fact that most of them prefer to cheat or plagiarize their way through college: the degree has significance while what they learn as they read has disintegrated. Thus, understanding why activists in the eighteenth century felt that printed books had to decrease in price via libraries and the like and why literacy had to spread might help us to regain some of these ideals in our own modern world.
“The market for print steadily expanded throughout the eighteenth-century Atlantic world thanks to printers’ efforts to ensure that ordinary people knew how to read and use printed matter. Reading is and was a collection of practices, performed in diverse but always very specific ways. These practices were spread down the social hierarchy through printed guides. Eve Tavor Bannet explores guides to six manners or methods of reading, each with its own social, economic, commercial, intellectual and pedagogical functions, and each promoting a variety of fragmentary and discontinuous reading practices. The increasingly widespread production of periodicals, pamphlets, prefaces, conduct books, conversation-pieces and fictions, together with schoolbooks designed for adults and children, disseminated all that people of all ages and ranks might need or wish to know about reading, and prepared them for new jobs and roles both in Britain and America.”
The interior of this book does not really address what I had hoped to find in it, but then again if a scholar wants to read a good book, he or she typically has to write it themselves. Instead, this book looks at the components of reading as a teacher of language needs to understand it, reviewing syllabic reading, grammars and dictionaries, reading aloud, tasteful language, and mimicry. There are some sections that address the topics that are in my areas of interest, including a section on the power of “Booksellers” or printers in this century, with an explanation on how they control the genres, topics and the like that was allowed to enter print and what gained a wider public consumption versus what died in obscurity (20-1). My own research has demonstrated that most writers who survive through the present moment through canonization at least at some point ran their own publishing ventures, thus allowing them to self-publish complex works that might not have been published by other publishers who might have been more interested in promoting their own creative efforts or efforts that were sponsored by patrons or other interested parties. For example, Richardson and Defoe both operated as printers, releasing some of their best-known works themselves. Defoe, Curll and other printers frequently suffered for their capacity to bypass this pre-publication censorship through self-publication when they were brought on charges for sedition against the crown in the resulting works, regardless of if they were truly the authors, or were only accused of being authors.
Most of the information delivered across this book is very obscure in the best of ways. I have never read about “conversation-pieces” before, a genre that: “provided stylized printed models of conversations… that centered on reading aloud” (109). Knowing about these types of practices and reading-learning patterns should help most researchers of this time and place to understand the audiences for the books released to them. If kids were looking for books to read aloud, this might have influenced the style of some of the popular novels or non-fictions, which might help a researcher explain a pattern or a theory regarding such productions or reader-author connections.
This book is worthy of serious scholarly review and close reading by scholars of this period, as it presents evidence that has been buried in the archives, and needs to become more visible and intertwined with critical discourse that touches on the texts read and printed, but not on how they were read and how they were printed.
 
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

The market for print steadily expanded throughout the eighteenth-century Atlantic world thanks to printers' efforts  to ensure that ordinary people knew how to read and use printed matter. Reading is and was a collection of practices, performed in diverse, but always very specific ways. These practices were spread down the social hierarchy through printed guides. Eve Tavor Bannet explores guides to six manners or methods of reading, each with its own social, economic, commercial, intellectual and pedagogical functions, and each promoting a variety of fragmentary and discontinuous reading practices. The increasingly widespread production of periodicals, pamphlets, prefaces, conduct books, conversation-pieces and fictions, together with schoolbooks designed for adults and children, disseminated all that people of all ages and ranks might need or wish to know about reading, and prepared them for new jobs and roles both in Britain and America.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: Inga betyg.

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 159,130,076 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig