HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

These Truths: a History of the United States

av Jill Lepore

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
9012517,484 (4.35)161
Written in elegiac prose, Lepore's groundbreaking investigation places truth itself--a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence--at the center of the nation's history. The American experiment rests on three ideas--"these truths," Jefferson called them--political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise?These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation's truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News.Along the way, Lepore's sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues' gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism.Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can't be shirked. There's nothing for it but to get to know it."… (mer)
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 161 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 24 (nästa | visa alla)
This is a great book and you should definitely read it. Be prepared to make a commitment - it's a tome, almost 800 pages of text and another 100+ of footnotes, credits, etc. Lepore knowingly took on a challenge, cover the entire history of the United States in one volume. While that's indeed both a strength and an accomplishment it's also one source of problems, weaknesses. She had to leave some things out to achieve that goal. Some of the omissions just are jarring, more about that later.

Back to the strengths. Lepore is a great writer. Easy to read even when the subject is off putting. She makes extensive use of metaphor making it easy to understand even obtuse topics. Two that stand out are seeing the internet as an amusement park, squeals included, and the future as the building a wooden sailboat. Both get to the point. But it made me wonder at times about what Wallace Stegner, Stanford professor of creative writing, said about writing. When asked about whether his books were fiction or autobiographical Stegner explained he always preferred fiction to non-fiction because the truth was too constraining and he could always imagine a better arc to the story. Was Lepore erring on the side of a better arc? I kept wondering.

The book is essentially chronological with lots of side trips. And like any good author who has a gun appear in act one it eventually goes off in act three. Like Hillary Rodham Clinton as a teenager supporting Nixon in 1960 and investigating what happened in Chicago. Of course she appears later when it's her turn. These hints of the future seem to be part of a message, the future was brewing all the time, it just wasn't soup yet. At times the side trips were distracting, are we going here now? Did we finish with that already, or is there more? I kept on looking ahead or off to the index hoping there would be more about something further on.

Perhaps the greatest strength of this book is it fills in missing information. This is especially true regarding the long history of Blacks in every aspect of American history and the women who have always been there, we just hadn't been told what they did. You will definitely learn something new, even if you thought you knew everything before.

Lepore does have some axes to grind. She sees computers, polling, consultants and advertising as detrimental to democracy. She never gives us a better alternative but she does believe they do not help us. She also sees the downside of totally unfiltered news sources. She is ready to see them as diluting natural discourse and enabled by the internet. She attributes the news environment's decline to these forces. Curiously she misses entirely Craig's list's destroying the business model print journalism had been built upon.

And now back to omissions. Craig's list is mentioned in passing but it's impact is missed entirely. Here are just a few things never (or barely) mentioned - Elvis Pressley, Jackie Robinson, John Glen, Neil Armstrong, Gerrymandering, demographics. Instead we hear about more marginal players such as Jane Franklin and Ithiel de Sola Pool. Yes some thing's had to be omitted to fit everything in to one volume. I personally would have preferred a two volume set.

At last but not least it ends with Donald Trump. Fortunately life continued, even if the book didn't. ( )
  Ed_Schneider | Feb 20, 2021 |
(5) Whew. What an undertaking. An 800 page densely written narrative political history of America starting in 1492 to Trump! Much of it was fascinating, though some of it was tedious. The central question of the book is - Can a populace govern themselves effectively and thoughtfully through a representative democratic government? The test case in the book is the U.S.A. as derived from the British colonies. Can the people take the reigns or will we be forever the playthings of accident, war, and whimsy? According to Lepore, the jury is still out and the prospects are not good.

I was most amazed at the echoes of today's culture wars and hyper-partisanship in the past. Abolition, the ERA, the Moral Majority. Here I thought opposition to teaching evolution in schools was a new beyond-the-pale crazy evangelical thing and it turns out to have been a 19th century hot-button issue embraced by a Democratic populist William Jennings Bryan. The political parties have jockeyed and reversed positions in terms of 'liberalism,' and 'conservatism' throughout our countries history. I was also amazed (and upset) that ultimately it is the 'industry' of political science that has put us at each others throats to better manipulate the electorate and capitalize for "their party," or "their candidate." My own beliefs on things like gun control, abortion, immigration, religious freedom are trumped up by an industry that doesn't necessarily have the nation's best interests at heart. Sigh.

I have come away from this undertaking much more knowledgeable about our country - it has been like a walk down memory lane of the History and Social Studies classes of days long gone by. I do feel like the book had an agenda, a bit of a thesis if you will that was not quite transparent despite the author's very valiant attempt to remain balanced. This is definitely an 'academic' look at history.

Overall though. . . Bravo! I am impressed, though thoroughly exhausted and a bit dispirited after reading which prevents a higher rating. ( )
  jhowell | Jan 23, 2021 |
This is a book about the history of the United States which I've had on my shelf for awhile but I never felt any urgency to read. I mean, the history of the US -- didn't I already learn all this? But this is not the history I learned ages ago and it definitely was an eye opener about why we are where we are today. Yes, it's long, and yes, some of the stories you probably have already heard, but I guarantee that if you read this book, you'll find some surprises that will shock you. The length -- over 900 pages -- might feel intimidating but her writing style is easy and entertaining and it's definitely well worth the read. ( )
  jmoncton | Dec 22, 2020 |
Beginnend met een wrede onderdrukking van de oorspronkelijke bewoners, volgden slavernij, vreemdelingenhaat en een alles verziekende rassen- en vrouwendiscriminatie. En dat alles weloverwogen en strijdig met de in de grondwet vastgelegde waarden van gelijkheid en vrijheid etc.etc. Amerika is en was voor talloos velen niet het land van onbeperkte mogelijkheden gebleken.

De basis van de staatsvorming is verkeerd geweest; tegen beter weten in is gekozen voor een weg naar blanke suprematie en het recht van de sterkste. Een weg die geplaveid is met rechteloosheid, manipulatie, leugens en “aanpassing” van feiten.

Deze prima geschreven studie is indrukwekkend en ontluisterend bovendien. ( )
  deklerk | Sep 15, 2020 |
For a British reader who only knew about key moments of American history, mainly from film or fiction, this was an excellent and easily readable overview of the colonisation of the thirteen original states, creation of the United States and the subsequent political history up to 2018 (although the last chapter feels less like history than good journalism).
Although a big book, with nearly 800 pages of text plus over 100 pages of notes and index, it is well structured and organised to describe the development of the US political system, especially the initial political “fudge” of slavery, the consequences of this fudge as the number of states increased, civil war (covered necessarily briefly in order to maintain momentum), the failure of reconstruction with the introduction of Jim Crow laws to impose segregation and the slow fight for racial and sexual equality. Although discussed, I felt that there should have been more about native Americans, but this lack may reflect American political history.
Overarching themes such as the waxing and waning of power between the presidency, Senate/House of Representatives and the Judiciary, and the rise and fall of the power of the press are skilfully interwoven. I found the importance of the Constitution and the referencing of specific “landmark” legal cases and their ongoing political ramifications very interesting (the UK doesn’t have a written constitution).
Highly recommended in providing an understanding of how the United States of America has arrived at where it is today and its complex myths. ( )
  CarltonC | Sep 10, 2020 |
Visa 1-5 av 24 (nästa | visa alla)
Lepore doesn’t cop to her own biases. Nor does she argue which systems of government are more insidious than others, though she has no trouble denouncing American slavery, American racism, Jim Crow, segregation and the on-going, never ending war (or so it seems) against African Americans. ...

If I were a good liberal I might say that my criticism of the book does not detract from its glory, and that it’s a triumph of scholarship. I can’t say that. I won’t say it. These Truths has moments of glory, but it will not help us as a nation and as a people to cut though the lies and the fake news of the Trump era.
 
Those devoted to an honest reckoning with America’s past have their work cut out for them. Lepore’s book is a good place to start.
tillagd av aprille | ändraWashington Post, H.W. Brands (Sep 20, 2018)
 
It isn’t until you start reading it that you realize how much we need a book like this one at this particular moment.

This book is aimed at a mass audience, driven by anecdote and statistic, memoir and photograph, with all the giants of American history in their respective places. There wasn’t a moment when I struggled to keep reading.

We need this book. Its reach is long, its narrative fresh and the arc of its account sobering to say the least. This is not Whig history. It is a classic tale of a unique country’s astonishing rise and just-as-inevitable fall.
tillagd av aprille | ändraNew York Times, Andrew Sullivan (betalvägg) (Sep 14, 2018)
 
This vivid history is a must-read for anyone wrestling with today's toxic political environment.
 
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Motto
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
We must disenthrall ourselves,

and then we shall save our country.


- Abraham Lincoln, 1862
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
"WE SAW NAKED PEOPLE," A BROAD-SHOULDERED SEA

captain from Genoa wrote in his diary, nearing land after weeks of staring at nothing but blue-black sea.
Citat
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
"To write something down doesn't make it true. But the history of truth is lashed to the history of writing like a mast to a sail. ....

To write something down is to make a fossil record of the mind. Stories are full of power and force; they seethe with meaning, with truth and lies, evasions and honesty." p12
...it has been the question ever since...Can a political society really be governed by reflection and election, by reason and truth, rather than by accident and violence, by prejudice and deceit?" (introduction)
Avslutande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
(Klicka för att visa. Varning: Kan innehålla spoilers.)
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Ursprungsspråk
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Written in elegiac prose, Lepore's groundbreaking investigation places truth itself--a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence--at the center of the nation's history. The American experiment rests on three ideas--"these truths," Jefferson called them--political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise?These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation's truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News.Along the way, Lepore's sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues' gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism.Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can't be shirked. There's nothing for it but to get to know it."

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (4.35)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 10
3.5 2
4 35
4.5 14
5 47

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 157,219,714 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig