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Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and…
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Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth (A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest County on Earth) (urspr publ 2018; utgåvan 2019)

av Sarah Smarsh (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
7504430,160 (3.88)34
Biography & Autobiography. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:*Finalist for the National Book Award*
*Finalist for the Kirkus Prize*
*Instant New York Times Bestseller*

*Named a Best Book of the Year by NPR, New York Post, BuzzFeed, Shelf Awareness, Bustle, and Publishers Weekly*

An essential read for our times: an eye-opening memoir of working-class poverty in America that will deepen our understanding of the ways in which class shapes our country and "a deeply humane memoir that crackles with clarifying insight".*
Sarah Smarsh was born a fifth generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side, and the product of generations of teen mothers on her maternal side. Through her experiences growing up on a farm thirty miles west of Wichita, we are given a unique and essential look into the lives of poor and working class Americans living in the heartland.

During Sarah's turbulent childhood in Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s, she enjoyed the freedom of a country childhood, but observed the painful challenges of the poverty around her; untreated medical conditions for lack of insurance or consistent care, unsafe job conditions, abusive relationships, and limited resources and information that would provide for the upward mobility that is the American Dream. By telling the story of her life and the lives of the people she loves with clarity and precision but without judgement, Smarsh challenges us to look more closely at the class divide in our country.

Beautifully written, in a distinctive voice, Heartland combines personal narrative with powerful analysis and cultural commentary, challenging the myths about people thought to be less because they earn less.

"Heartland is one of a growing number of important works??including Matthew Desmond's Evicted and Amy Goldstein's Janesville??that together merit their own section in nonfiction aisles across the country: America's postindustrial decline...Smarsh shows how the false promise of the 'American dream' was used to subjugate the poor. It's a powerful mantra" *(The New York Times Book Review)
… (mer)
Medlem:EveEttinger
Titel:Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth (A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest County on Earth)
Författare:Sarah Smarsh (Författare)
Info:Scribner (2019), Edition: 1, 320 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth av Sarah Smarsh (2018)

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» Se även 34 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 44 (nästa | visa alla)
Finally, a memoir by someone who escaped moral and material poverty in the U.S.A. and who openly points at the elephant in the room: one lucky, focused, intellectually gifted child who makes it does not justify the puritan mentality that relegates the poor in a corner in the name of self-improvement. You can be a hard worker, with values and all, and still be condemned to a lifetime of shame, poverty and possibly substance addiction. Even if you are white!!! This is the most important legacy of the memoir: it is never (only) a matter of skin colour, religion, good will. IT IS A MATTER OF CLASSISM.
Here, I wrote it. No, SHE wrote it. And if you think that she cannot talk because she is white, read this other one
[b:There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir|38650651|There Will Be No Miracles Here A Memoir|Casey Gerald|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1526399296l/38650651._SY75_.jpg|60261760]
He writes pretty much the same thing, but he is black.
( )
  Elanna76 | May 2, 2024 |
Engaging and thought provoking. Excellent read. ( )
  dkornf | Mar 29, 2024 |
Really 3.5 stars. I liked the idea of this book and a lot of the story, but it didn’t grab me. ( )
  danielskatz | Dec 26, 2023 |
I wanted to like this book since it deals with people and places quite familiar to me, being a native Kansan and living in Wichita for 45 years. However, I found the "baby that never was" contrived and awkward. The book rambled and seemed disorganized. The message of don't get pregnant as a teenager, don't do drugs is a good one, and it paid off for the author. That was nice to see. ( )
  Maryjane75 | Sep 30, 2023 |
I bought this book because it was a National Book Award finalist, and was included in NPR's "Best Books of 2018."

It's a memoir in the style of "Hillbilly Elegy;" a woman overcomes her difficult and impoverished upbringing in the Plains States to become a successful writer and evolved individual. It's more of a family history; an unflattering story told here, then another unflattering story told there. Very similar to "Hillbilly Elegy" (which I did not enjoy reading either).

It is written as if told to an unborn ( even unconceived) child the author might have had (could have had) as a teen. I initially thought this was an imaginative and interesting angle, but honestly this takes up only a small portion of the book. IMHO she might have developed this angle further, or just left it out entirely.

( )
  dmtrader | Aug 4, 2023 |
Visa 1-5 av 44 (nästa | visa alla)
The book is a personal, decades-long story of America’s coordinated assault on its underclass.... Thanks to persistent false narratives about poverty, families like mine and Smarsh’s — perhaps yours too — wasted generations believing in “trickle down” economics, leaving us “standing outside with our mouths open praying for money to rain.” Ultimately, we concluded that “the American Dream has a price tag on it,” and “the poorer you are, the higher the price.”
tillagd av Lemeritus | ändraLos Angeles Times, Leah Hampton (betalvägg) (Sep 28, 2018)
 
Part memories, part economic analysis, part sociological treatise, Heartland ties together various threads of American society of the last 40 years ... Smarsh’s book is persuasive not only for the facts she marshals, but also because of the way she expresses it ... she uses minute detail to get across the tenuous state of the lives of her family ... in her silent speeches to a never-born child, Smarsh spells out clearly what she has gained, what she has had to leave behind and the cost for both.
 
...the book circumambulates several major themes: body, land, shame. Smarsh describes the toll of labor on those who have no choice but to do it — a work force priced out of health insurance by its privatization. Neighbors are maimed by combines and the author’s father nearly dies from chemical poisoning a week into a job transporting used cleaning solvent. Women absorb their husbands’ frustrations, blow by blow. Meanwhile, big agribusinesses strangle the region’s family farms, leaving behind a brackish residue of shame — the shame of being poor and white.
tillagd av Lemeritus | ändraNew York Times, Francesca Mari (betalvägg) (Sep 10, 2018)
 
It is through education that Smarsh is able to avoid their fate; but while hers is a happy ending, she is still haunted by the fact that being poor is associated with being bad. Smarsh’s raw and intimate narrative exposes a country of economic inequality that “has failed its children.”
tillagd av Lemeritus | ändraPublishers Weekly (Jun 11, 2018)
 

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Sarah Smarshprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Miceli, JayaOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Putorti, JillFormgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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It’s funny that both their children were born weeks before an election that Reagan won. We would be able to map our lives against the destruction of the working class: the demise of the family farm, the dismantling of public health, the defunding of public schools, wages so stagnant that full-time workers could no longer pay the bills. Historic wealth inequality was old news to us by the time it hit the newspapers in the new millennium. (Chapter 1: “A Penny in a Purse”)
How can you talk about the poor child without addressing the country that let her be so? It's a relatively new way of thinking for me. I was raised to put all responsibility on the individual, on bootstraps with which she ought pull herself up. But it's the way of things that environment changes outcomes.

Or to put it in my first language:
The crop depends on the weather, dudnit? A good seed 'll do 'er job 'n' sprout, but come hail 'n' you're plumb outta luck, regardless. (“Dear August,” p. 3, Scribner (2018))
When I found your name, in my early adulthood, I don't think I'd ever heard the term “white working class.” The experience it describes includes both racial privilege and economic disadvantage, which can exist simultaneously. This was an obvious, apolitical for those of us who lived in that juxtaposition every day. But it seemed to make people uneasy, as though our grievance put us in competition with poor people of other races. Wealthy white people, in particular, seemed to want to distance themselves from our place and our truth. Our struggles forced a question about America that many were not willing to face: If a person could go to work every day and still not be able to pay the bills and the reason wasn't racism, what less articulated problem was afoot. (“A Penny in a Purse,” p. 13-14, Scribner (2018))
When I was growing up, the United States had convinced itself that class didn't exist here. […] This lack of acknowledgement at once invalidated what we were experiencing and shamed us if we tried to express it. Class was not discussed, let alone understood. […] The defining feeling of childhood was that of being told that there wasn't a problem when I knew damn well there was. (“A Penny in a Purse,” p. 14, Scribner (2018), elisions added)
We were “below the poverty line” I'd later understand – distasteful to to better-off whites, I think, for having failed economically in the context of their own race. And we were of a place, the Great Plains, spurned by more powerful corners of the country as a monolithic cultural waste land. “Flyover country,” people called it, like walking there might be dangerous. Its people were “backwards,” “rednecks,” maybe even “trash.” (“A Penny in a Purse,” p. 14 - 15, Scribner (2018))
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Biography & Autobiography. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:*Finalist for the National Book Award*
*Finalist for the Kirkus Prize*
*Instant New York Times Bestseller*

*Named a Best Book of the Year by NPR, New York Post, BuzzFeed, Shelf Awareness, Bustle, and Publishers Weekly*

An essential read for our times: an eye-opening memoir of working-class poverty in America that will deepen our understanding of the ways in which class shapes our country and "a deeply humane memoir that crackles with clarifying insight".*
Sarah Smarsh was born a fifth generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side, and the product of generations of teen mothers on her maternal side. Through her experiences growing up on a farm thirty miles west of Wichita, we are given a unique and essential look into the lives of poor and working class Americans living in the heartland.

During Sarah's turbulent childhood in Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s, she enjoyed the freedom of a country childhood, but observed the painful challenges of the poverty around her; untreated medical conditions for lack of insurance or consistent care, unsafe job conditions, abusive relationships, and limited resources and information that would provide for the upward mobility that is the American Dream. By telling the story of her life and the lives of the people she loves with clarity and precision but without judgement, Smarsh challenges us to look more closely at the class divide in our country.

Beautifully written, in a distinctive voice, Heartland combines personal narrative with powerful analysis and cultural commentary, challenging the myths about people thought to be less because they earn less.

"Heartland is one of a growing number of important works??including Matthew Desmond's Evicted and Amy Goldstein's Janesville??that together merit their own section in nonfiction aisles across the country: America's postindustrial decline...Smarsh shows how the false promise of the 'American dream' was used to subjugate the poor. It's a powerful mantra" *(The New York Times Book Review)

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