HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

One person, no vote : how voter suppression…
Laddar...

One person, no vote : how voter suppression is destroying our democracy (urspr publ 2018; utgåvan 2018)

av Carol Anderson

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
211795,510 (4.21)5
Finalist for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Longlisted for the National Book Award in Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by: Washington Post *Boston Globe * NPR* Bustle * BookRiot *New York Public Library From the award-winning,New York Times bestselling author ofWhite Rage, the startling--and timely--history of voter suppression in America, with a foreword by Senator Dick Durbin. In herNew York Times bestsellerWhite Rage, Carol Anderson laid bare an insidious history of policies that have systematically impeded black progress in America, from 1865 to our combustible present. WithOne Person, No Vote, she chronicles a related history: the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the 2013 Supreme Court decision that eviscerated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Known as theShelbyruling, this decision effectively allowed districts with a demonstrated history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice. Focusing on the aftermath ofShelby, Anderson follows the astonishing story of government-dictated racial discrimination unfolding before our very eyes as more and more states adopt voter suppression laws. In gripping, enlightening detail she explains how voter suppression works, from photo ID requirements to gerrymandering to poll closures. And with vivid characters, she explores the resistance: the organizing, activism, and court battles to restore the basic right to vote to all Americans.… (mer)
Medlem:FourFreedoms
Titel:One person, no vote : how voter suppression is destroying our democracy
Författare:Carol Anderson
Info:New York, NY : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2018.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:to-read

Verkdetaljer

One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy av Carol Anderson (2018)

Ingen/inga.

Ingen/inga
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 5 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
Is there massive, wide-scale voter fraud? No, as numerous studies have definitively confirmed. Is there fraud? Absolutely, as this well-researched book points out. The systematic efforts at voter suppression implemented by Republican officials across the nation is an attack on the opportunity to vote, mainly, of course, directed at minorities and young people. Granted that precedent leaves to states control over voting procedures, but we clearly need national legislation (or constitutional amendment?) to proscribe this blatantly anti-democratic outrage. ( )
  stevesmits | Nov 23, 2020 |
A strong read about an important topic that takes on more urgency in 2020. The beginning chapters tell the story of the history of suppressing the vote in the US; the rest of the chapters detail the current methods of suppression. This book motivated me to get my request for absentee ballot in the mail first thing in the morning! (I used Federal Voting Assistance Program website at FVAP.gov)

However, this is not an engaging read, so I had to pace myself with one chapter a day. The writing is very dry and almost academic; it seemed the purpose was to educate community organizers and local politicians, not the general reader/voter. It is shorter than the page count indicates; there are many pages of notes and sources - which shows Ms. Anderson's care in research. There was no narrative or people to follow through the entire book; there is just glimpses of the work community organizers are doing at the local and state level to get voters to the polls. There were a few mentions on lawsuits that are going through the courts to fight the suppression. But this was an overview, a jumping off point; I could have used a chapter on what the individual voter can do to fight suppression other than join a community group or donating money to those groups. I just don't think the average voter is the right audience for this book - this is more for organizers and activists to educate themselves and give them a starting off point for their work. ( )
  teastitchread | Aug 16, 2020 |
For much of the time I was reading One Person, No Vote, I thought it unnecessary because we already have Give Us the Ballot (Ari Berman). However, this one 1. is from a different perspective, 2. is updated, and 3. has a nifty list of resource organizations in which to get involved/to support.

Like GUtB, OPNV is fairly dry, absolutely infuriating, and a must-read. We have behaved (are still behaving) shamefully as a country. All of us who are able to vote (those of us who still have franchise—while we still have it) must vote for candidates who will do what's right for the entire country and all its people, not for those who are power-hungry and greedy of resources. ( )
  joyblue | Jan 17, 2020 |
This is the second book by this author that I have read. Her first book was more comprehensive than this one, but, as I look back at what I wrote about that first book, this one, also, is quite energetic in its presentation. I related the first book to a fiery court summation by an attorney, as opposed to the more methodical laying out of evidence throughout the court case. This book concentrates on the suppression of voting by minorities in America. Ari Berman's Give Us the Ballot covers similar ground, spending more time on federal administration and law changes, and was written before the Russians teamed up with various states to manipulate voter turnout in 2016. This new book by the author lays out a great deal of Jim Crow excesses, but also goes full bore into the more recent work of Republicans in Kansas, Wisconsin, Ohio, Georgia, Alabama, and North Carolina, to maximize white votes over that of minorities. (No one can accuse people with deep hatred of people not like them of not being creative.) The author's chapter on the Roy Moore/Doug Jones senatorial campaign is especially enlightening on just how big the obstacles are to overcome these voter suppression efforts, but, very importantly, that those obstacles can, indeed, be overcome. This is not just a book of opinions. It has nearly 100 pages of supporting notes to justify her points. As I said of the author's first book, if you are willing to read just one book on the subject, her work this time out is also an excellent choice. ( )
  larryerick | Mar 3, 2019 |
One Person, No Vote is Carol Anderson’s examination of the systemic evisceration of voting rights, a long-term campaign that includes redistricting to minimize the voting power of African American voters, making voter registration more difficult, purging voters from the rolls, requiring identification that is more likely to be held by white voters than black voters, and voter intimidation with selective prosecution of organizers and voters.

One Person, No Vote is a relatively short book, but it is packed with history and information. The first chapter focuses on the history of voter disenfranchisement: the various schemes employed to prevent African Americans from voting during Jim Crow; the reaction to the Voting Rights Act; the many efforts to overturn the Voting Rights Act; and the series of recent Supreme Court decisions that have undercut and eviscerated voting rights. Citizens United unleashed the monied oligarchy. Shelby v Holder took enforcement power from the Voting Rights Act. Vieth allowed partisan gerrymandering.

The Supreme Court decisions unleased multiple strategies to suppress the votes of people of color and poor people, the people Republicans think will vote Democratic. Gerrymandering has become so extreme that in Wisconsin despite 190,000 more people voting for Democrats, the Republicans got nearly two/thirds of the seats. Similar strategies have allowed minority rule in Congress and in many states. Voter suppression tactics like voter purges, voter ID, persecution of organizations that register voters, and voter intimidation are rampant.

Anderson has full chapters dedicated to Voter ID and Voter Purges as they are two of the most powerful and effective ways of keeping people from voting. Once someone is prevented from voting, they often do not try again, making it an efficient strategy of discouraging a voter for life. There is another chapter that looks at things like making voter registration so restrictive organizations don’t even try. For example, the League of Women Voters stopped operations in Florida. Sometimes they close voting locations so there are longer lines or relocated polling places, even in one example, moving the town’s polling place to out of town. They restrict early voting, for example, in Indiana, smaller counties are allowed multiple early voting sites, but the big cities are not. That’s the opposite of sensible.

The last chapters are on resistance and moving forward. Even they are depressing.

Anderson’s One Person, No Vote is a powerful indictment of our democracy and shows how much we have allowed democratic values to be undermined. Anderson struggles to find hope and suggestions for improvement, but when I finished the book, I felt dispirited. In the end, Anderson made me feel despair. I really want to feel resolve and hope, but there seems so little room for hope. The successful example of resistance was Alabama and Doug Jones’ victory. Anderson shows the important grassroots organizing that brought Jones to victory but Roy Moore was a uniquely flawed candidate and despite that, it took brilliant and long-term organizing to defeat him. Perhaps if she had included a few other surprise victories in special elections that were against candidates who weren’t unindicted sex offenders might have been more inspiring of hope.

This is an important book and one we need to take to heart. We need to rebuild our democracy and it might have left me more helpful if Anderson had mentioned Obama and Holder’s efforts on redistricting. We need something to hold onto or we won’t have the will to do the work.

I received a copy of One Person, No Vote from the publisher through NetGalley

One Person, No Vote at Bloomsbury
Carol Anderson author site

https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpress.com/2019/01/02/9781635571370/ ( )
  Tonstant.Weader | Jan 2, 2019 |
Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

» Lägg till fler författare

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Carol Andersonprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Durbin, DickFörordmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Edwards, JaninaBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Finalist for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Longlisted for the National Book Award in Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by: Washington Post *Boston Globe * NPR* Bustle * BookRiot *New York Public Library From the award-winning,New York Times bestselling author ofWhite Rage, the startling--and timely--history of voter suppression in America, with a foreword by Senator Dick Durbin. In herNew York Times bestsellerWhite Rage, Carol Anderson laid bare an insidious history of policies that have systematically impeded black progress in America, from 1865 to our combustible present. WithOne Person, No Vote, she chronicles a related history: the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the 2013 Supreme Court decision that eviscerated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Known as theShelbyruling, this decision effectively allowed districts with a demonstrated history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice. Focusing on the aftermath ofShelby, Anderson follows the astonishing story of government-dictated racial discrimination unfolding before our very eyes as more and more states adopt voter suppression laws. In gripping, enlightening detail she explains how voter suppression works, from photo ID requirements to gerrymandering to poll closures. And with vivid characters, she explores the resistance: the organizing, activism, and court battles to restore the basic right to vote to all Americans.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (4.21)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 4
3.5
4 10
4.5 2
5 8

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 154,614,781 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig