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The luckiest guerrilla : a true tale of…
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The luckiest guerrilla : a true tale of love, war and the army (utgåvan 2018)

av Patricia Murphy Minch

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871,684,880 (4.08)Ingen/inga
"The Luckiest Guerrilla" tells the remarkable, enchanting story of Philippines survivor Colonel Arthur Philip Murphy. Relying extensively on letters from Arthur and his wife Lillian, their daughter Patricia has penned an engrossing World War II narrative that is both a historical treasure chest and captivating on a personal level.Only ten hours after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, they also bombed Luzon, Philippines. Ten days later enemy troops swarmed ashore, bent on swiftly annihilating General MacArthur's ill-prepared defenses, commandeering the country's natural resources, and subjugating its people.By pure happenstance, Murphy avoided the pitiful surrender to the Japanese of 70,000-plus Fil-American troops there in April 1942, and he avoided the infamous Bataan Death March that resulted in the deaths of thousands. Instead, he opted to defy the surrender order and, with three companions, take his chances in the Igorot mountain country.An obstinate, outspoken rebel, incurable romantic, amateur philosopher, and stoic executioner, Murphy was never captured, never wounded. He not only survived for three years behind enemy lines, he helped create a 22,000-man guerrilla army that harassed the Japanese, provided invaluable intelligence to MacArthur's island-hopping army, and played a significant role in the battles fought during the waning months of the war, all while cultivating and maintaining, by whatever means necessary, continued support and loyalty among the Igorot headhunters of North Luzon.… (mer)
Medlem:toonarmycaptain
Titel:The luckiest guerrilla : a true tale of love, war and the army
Författare:Patricia Murphy Minch
Info:Gleneden Beach, OR : First Steps Pub., 2018.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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The Luckiest Guerrilla av Patricia Murphy Minch

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As a reservist in WWII, Art Murphy volunteered to spend a tour in the Philippines. Believing his wife and children would accompany him on the next boat, Art set's off for adventure and excitement. The war heats up, the Japanese invade, and Art finds himself in the mountains with a small number of soldiers. Determined not to surrender, he becomes one of the Philippine guerilla's.

The story of the guerilla's in the Philippine's was an interesting one. The length of time they were able to survive and harass the Japanese was pretty miraculous. I didn't really feel like I got to know Art or his comrades, the book was more focused on where they were when. Overall, not a book I would re-read, but one I would recommend to history enthusiasts. ( )
  JanaRose1 | Nov 21, 2018 |
Early Reviewer Book. The author did an excellent job of relating the events of her father’s time in the Philippines during World War II. Amazing what these men were able to do with support from the people living there. Guerilla warfare wasn’t new but had never been taught to the military, so I was impressed with the organization and communication that they were able to establish in such primitive circumstances. Over all a very enlightening book about a time and place in American history. ( )
  perennialreader | Nov 14, 2018 |
Patricia Minch's book, The Luckiest Guerrilla, had an inauspicious beginning and I thought I was going to have to force myself to trudge through it. But since I received a free copy for my review, I began the trudge and I am so happy that I did.

Ms. Minch brilliantly tells the story of the guerrillas who chose not to surrender after the Japanese invaded the Philippines. Much has been written about the WW2 campaign in the Pacific theater following the Japanese attack on Hawaii and US interests in the far east, but this is a little reported on history of a brave network of soldiers who, with little to no support or communication from the US military, built an extensive network of fighters who survived in enemy-held territory for over three years and did as much damage to the occupying forces as possible while trying to avoid capture. They were forced to make hard decisions, not knowing if their decision would result in a commendation or a court-martial. This book also tells some of the stories of the brave native people who risked brutal torture and death to aid the American soldiers-- in fact, Philippine soldiers and civilians flocked in large number to join the American guerrillas and fight for the liberation of their islands. This is a story of cooperation and triumph, highs and lows. I was moved to tears reading about the moments when they first heard of MacArthur's return and they began to realize their fight was over and they were going to be reunited with the returning US troops.

But this is much more than a retelling of dates and places, plots and skirmishes, the daily grind of outnumbered soldiers in hiding behind enemy lines, though all of those things are included in this book. This is foremost a very personal story of the author's father and mother, Colonel Murphy and Lillian Murphy, and how war changes people and families. Ms. Minch shares deeply personal stories, letters and first-hand memoirs written by her father during all those long months of hiding in the mountains, including the times when he hints at the future his wife and daughters should live on without him if he didn't make it out alive. Through the course of the war and through reading his correspondence the reader senses how the war altered Colonel Murphy's perspective on life, family and love. This book also tells the seldom told story of the families left behind-- in this case with the added burden of not receiving any word for years about the soldier they love and long to hear from. Lillian Murphy had to continue her life, to stretch herself beyond anything she had done before, to maintain daily life for herself, her children, her mother and siblings, and other army wives left behind.

There is also one especially remarkable event that is recorded: a moment when Colonel Murphy, against all odds, is in the right place at the right time to hear his wife's voice on the radio. I will leave the details for the reader to discover on their own, but reading that account was a highlight of the entire book for me.

Most of all this is a story of human connection and love, of surviving overwhelming odds and becoming better and stronger people on the other side. It is very much worth reading. I hope one day there will be a movie but only if it tells the story just as Patricia Murphey Minch tells it in this book. And when my friends tell me how brilliant the move is, I will be proud to tell them that I read the book before it was even published! ( )
  55T-bird | Nov 5, 2018 |
I'm not normally interested in nonfiction books, but I'm glad I gave this one a shot. I received an ebook through Early Reviewers and now I want to buy a hard copy for my dad since he is such a fan of history. I expected the story to be engaging, but weirdly, the photographs made the story more real to me. Give it a shot if you have a chance. ( )
  cartomancer | Nov 5, 2018 |
I enjoy books about WWII (my dad was in the invasion of Okinawa and was separated from my mom for two years). But perhaps "enjoy" isn't the right word here. I like reading about WWII. I like learning about what many call "the greatest generation", and in many respects they were great--not perfect--no one is--but they were extraordinary men and women.

So when I was offered the chance to read THE LUCKIEST GUERRILLA prior to its publication, I jumped at it. Although I have to admit I felt a certain amount of trepidation in doing so, as the last WWII book I read had been more like a bad romance novel than a true depiction of the men and women who lived through that war.

Not so THE LUCKIEST GUERRILLA. It is an honest (sometime brutally so) depiction of the guerrilla movement that took place after the Americans surrendered the Philippine Islands to the Japanese. The story is told by Patricia Murphy Minch, the daughter of one of the men who refused to surrender. Her father, Colonel Arthur "Art" Murphy hid in the mountains and kept up the fight.

I have to admit his decision made me wonder what I would have done under similar circumstances. I fear I would have lacked his courage. And yet, many of those who did surrender ended up dying horrible deaths in POW camps.

As for Colonel Murphy, he and several other American soldiers managed to unite the various Philippine guerrilla units into a lethal fighting force that for three long and bloody years wreaked havoc on the Japanese. Many of them died, but their courage and exploits are now legendary. And in the end they were able to provide the intelligence and support MacArthur needed to wrench the Philippines from Japanese control.

In telling this story, Ms. Minch utilized letters exchanged between her parents (some not delivered until after the war was over), and these letters give us an intimate (sometimes surprisingly intimate!) look into the lives of not only the soldiers in the field, but also their loved ones back home. The struggles these men and women faced were overwhelming, and kudos to Ms. Minch for turning an unwavering eye on both of their stories.

I should also mention that Ms. Minch's research into the guerrilla war was impeccable, and the depth of her detail transports the reader to those hot, miserable Philippine jungles, where death often waited around the next bend in the trail.

If you're a fan of WWII books, I HIGHLY recommend you read THE LUCKIEST GUERRILLA. But even if you're not, I also HIGHLY recommend you read it. Why? Because it is more than another war story. It is at its heart a love story, and perhaps the most realistic one I have ever read. In a literary world filled with fake romance novels, wouldn't you like to read the unblemished true story of how two human beings managed to keep their love intact throughout one of the most horrendous episodes in human history? I guarantee you will find it both powerful and inspiring.

Thank you to First Steps Publishing for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book! ( )
1 rösta FredLHolmes | Nov 1, 2018 |
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"The Luckiest Guerrilla" tells the remarkable, enchanting story of Philippines survivor Colonel Arthur Philip Murphy. Relying extensively on letters from Arthur and his wife Lillian, their daughter Patricia has penned an engrossing World War II narrative that is both a historical treasure chest and captivating on a personal level.Only ten hours after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, they also bombed Luzon, Philippines. Ten days later enemy troops swarmed ashore, bent on swiftly annihilating General MacArthur's ill-prepared defenses, commandeering the country's natural resources, and subjugating its people.By pure happenstance, Murphy avoided the pitiful surrender to the Japanese of 70,000-plus Fil-American troops there in April 1942, and he avoided the infamous Bataan Death March that resulted in the deaths of thousands. Instead, he opted to defy the surrender order and, with three companions, take his chances in the Igorot mountain country.An obstinate, outspoken rebel, incurable romantic, amateur philosopher, and stoic executioner, Murphy was never captured, never wounded. He not only survived for three years behind enemy lines, he helped create a 22,000-man guerrilla army that harassed the Japanese, provided invaluable intelligence to MacArthur's island-hopping army, and played a significant role in the battles fought during the waning months of the war, all while cultivating and maintaining, by whatever means necessary, continued support and loyalty among the Igorot headhunters of North Luzon.

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