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Patron Saints of Nothing av Randy Ribay
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Patron Saints of Nothing (utgåvan 2019)

av Randy Ribay (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
3341359,591 (4.36)6
A NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST "Brilliant, honest, and equal parts heartbreaking and soul-healing." --Laurie Halse Anderson, author of SHOUT  "A singular voice in the world of literature." --Jason Reynolds, author of Long Way Down A powerful coming-of-age story about grief, guilt, and the risks a Filipino-American teenager takes to uncover the truth about his cousin's murder. Jay Reguero plans to spend the last semester of his senior year playing video games before heading to the University of Michigan in the fall. But when he discovers that his Filipino cousin Jun was murdered as part of President Duterte's war on drugs, and no one in the family wants to talk about what happened, Jay travels to the Philippines to find out the real story. Hoping to uncover more about Jun and the events that led to his death, Jay is forced to reckon with the many sides of his cousin before he can face the whole horrible truth -- and the part he played in it. As gripping as it is lyrical, Patron Saints of Nothing is a page-turning portrayal of the struggle to reconcile faith, family, and immigrant identity.… (mer)
Medlem:jimrgill
Titel:Patron Saints of Nothing
Författare:Randy Ribay (Författare)
Info:Kokila (2019), 352 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:*****
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Patron Saints of Nothing av Randy Ribay

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» Se även 6 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 13 (nästa | visa alla)
"Truth is a hungry thing." (pg 29) "There are moments when sharing silence can be more meaningful than filling a space with empty chatter." (pg 123)A thrilling story with a crisp narrative that makes you think and demand change. Patron Saints of Nothing masterfully tackles the bystander who looks at injustice and says nothing. Of course, there are many gut punches and some of the best family moments/dynamics I have seen.

I wholeheartedly recommend and definitely would reread. I adore the character Jun. Just read the story you will too. this also acknowledges not to idolize a person/have unrealistic expectations. Jun was basically a good Samaritan/arguably a truly Christlike person yet he was still human. Every character felt so realistic because people aren't just black and white. A part of me wishes Jun would've died the upstanding radical activist, but him succumbing to drugs is also an interesting angle

Also, best love story that never was Pfft... Not Mia and Jay *rolls eyes* I'm talking about Jun and Reyna. ;___; ( )
  DestDest | Jul 29, 2020 |
Patron Saints of Nothing is the best YA book of the year so far.

Randy Ribay really knows how to write. His style is clear and straightforward, and the occasional figurative language never feels purple. His pacing is perfect. Jay’s journey and the lessons he learns from it are nuanced, not hamfisted. In one particular, subtle stroke of brilliance, every chapter title consists of the last words of that chapter... until, toward the end of the book, Jay grows less obsessed with Jun’s ending and begins to look to the future. Then the titling pattern changes, mirroring his shifting perspective. Details like that really make this book stand out.

What I appreciated most, however, was Ribay’s compassion for people who are so often overlooked or demonized. I am not Filipino; I have no personal experience with the war on drugs in the Philippines. But I do come from a region in America where opioid addiction runs rampant, and addiction in general runs in my family. My country has had its own war on drugs and has its own messed up preconceived notions of addicts - plenty of people here would rather a drug addict die than receive help. Of course, this book, which takes place mostly in the Philippines, is primarily about addiction and poverty there, not in America. But there’s a moment when Jay, who grew up in the States, realizes that these dangerous ideas - that addicts are societal parasites, that they deserve to be killed or at least do not deserve justice - have been ingrained in him, too, pointing toward an unfortunately universal truth.

Ribay spends the whole book challenging attitudes like this. He does so well, with tremendous empathy. His love for the Philippines - all of the Philippines, including and especially those who live on the margins - shines. This sort of work, this pushing back against the dehumanization of addicts and the impoverished, is important. It’s important, too, to center people of color, and in this case Filipino people especially, who are disproportionately affected by anti-addict policies and rhetoric.

My one quibble with this book is the quasi-romantic relationship between a seventeen- and nineteen-year-old. Jay is at the end of his senior year, so it would’ve been easy to make him eighteen and eliminate that gray area; I’m not sure why Ribay didn’t do that. Maybe because people expect YA protagonists to be 15-17? I don’t know. It was an odd choice. Also, there’s a character who switches from fifteen to sixteen and back again. That’s a small detail, though, and overall this is a fantastic book, beautiful, touching, complex in exactly the way it needs to be. ( )
  livmae | Jul 17, 2020 |
Patron Saints of Nothing is a read that touched my heart. Jay is finishing high school and has been accepted at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. His dad was born and raised in the Philippines and his mom is American. Jay's cousin, Jun writes letters back and forth with his cousin. Suddenly Jun dies and no one will answer Jay's questions regarding how. Jay ventures to the Philippines to get answers and visit family over spring break. Will Jay unearth the truth surrounding his cousin's death?

Jay is a strong character, who learns more about his culture right along with the reader. The happenings brought me closer to the characters and left me in tears at its conclusion. ( )
  lflareads | Jun 27, 2020 |
Jay was born in The Philippines but hasn't lived there since he was very young. Nonetheless, he is close to his cousin Jun. When Jun suddenly and tragically dies, Jay is determined to find out the reason why despite the family's resistance. Jay uses his spring break to return to Manilla and find out what really happened to his cousin. Along the way, the reader learns many things about relationships, dysfunctional but loving families, cultural differences, and the imperfect nature of friendship. In other words: Jun is not quite who everyone thinks he is and through this experience Jay reconnects with his Filipino side. A terrific look at the life of a first-generation American and the push/pull of alternate cultural traditions. ( )
1 rösta mjspear | Jan 22, 2020 |
This is not your typical coming of age story full of teenage angst and drama. While our narrator, Jay, is a teenager, this story is mature, poignant, complex, and emotional.

Jay's search for answers takes him from his comfortable Michigan suburb to an entirely different sort of life with his extended family in the Philippines. I'm embarrassed to admit that, prior to reading this book, I knew little about the Philippines' drug war and its terrifying government policies. Randy Ribay's writing is totally immersive, so that, through Jay's story, I experienced and understood what it must be like to come of age in such a militant, dangerous environment.

*I received a review copy from the publisher, via BookishFirst.* ( )
1 rösta Darcia | Jan 13, 2020 |
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A NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST "Brilliant, honest, and equal parts heartbreaking and soul-healing." --Laurie Halse Anderson, author of SHOUT  "A singular voice in the world of literature." --Jason Reynolds, author of Long Way Down A powerful coming-of-age story about grief, guilt, and the risks a Filipino-American teenager takes to uncover the truth about his cousin's murder. Jay Reguero plans to spend the last semester of his senior year playing video games before heading to the University of Michigan in the fall. But when he discovers that his Filipino cousin Jun was murdered as part of President Duterte's war on drugs, and no one in the family wants to talk about what happened, Jay travels to the Philippines to find out the real story. Hoping to uncover more about Jun and the events that led to his death, Jay is forced to reckon with the many sides of his cousin before he can face the whole horrible truth -- and the part he played in it. As gripping as it is lyrical, Patron Saints of Nothing is a page-turning portrayal of the struggle to reconcile faith, family, and immigrant identity.

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