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The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming (2019)

av David Wallace-Wells

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,4935712,162 (3.95)34
"It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible. In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, "500-year" storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century. In his travelogue of our near future, David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await--food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe. But the world will be remade by warming in more profound ways as well, transforming our politics, our culture, our relationship to technology, and our sense of history. It will be all-encompassing, shaping and distorting nearly every aspect of human life as it is lived today. Like An Inconvenient Truth and Silent Spring before it, The Uninhabitable Earth is both a meditation on the devastation we have brought upon ourselves and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation"--… (mer)
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» Se även 34 omnämnanden

engelska (53)  tyska (1)  nederländska (1)  finska (1)  spanska (1)  Alla språk (57)
Visa 1-5 av 57 (nästa | visa alla)
This book wasn't what I expected at all. Instead of providing some creative solutions to the ongoing global warming, it simply provides speculation about what life would look like with the consequences of global warming.

While I see some merit in that, I don't really see the purpose of this book, except for it being singularly alarmist. People who believe in climate change don't really get anything out of this except for some chaotically edited passages describing anxiety-inducing scenarios. Those who actually need to be converted won't be persuaded by anything written in here.



( )
  ZeljanaMaricFerli | Mar 4, 2024 |
Viel lässt sich zu diesem Buch nicht sagen. Der Autor eröffnet ein wissenschaftlich gestützes Szenario, wie es weiter gehen wird, wenn wir die Erderwärmung nicht stoppen. Da wir das nicht tun, wird es so kommen. Ich habe da wenig Hoffnung und bin bestürzt und beschämt, wenn ich an meine Freunde in Ruanda denke oder auch an meine Enkel. Am schlimmsten finde ich, dass wir seit dem Kyoto-Protokoll oder der Ausstrahlung des Al Gore Films "Eine unbequeme "Wahrheit" unsere Emmissionen immerzu erhöhrt haben. Es ist nichts besser geworden. Und mehr lässt sich dazu nicht sagen, denn das Buch ist auch schon wieder fünf Jahre alt, in denen nichts passiert ist. Die Aussagen zur Atomkraft finde ich etwas kurzsichtig, denn wollen wir wirklich unseren Nachfahren, die so weit von uns entfernt sind wie Christi Geburt, strahlenden Müll hinterlassen? ( )
  Wassilissa | Feb 17, 2024 |
Book publishers will drive me insane if they continue to give books titles that misrepresent the actual content of the book.

“The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming,” by David Wallace-Wells, isn’t really about the planet Earth after the current episode of global warming is completed.

It’s really about what we can expect from the planet while it is warming. Like right now. And that is what is so terrifying about the book. Instead of focussing on the future, Wallace-Wells is foremost telling us what is happening now under our noses, while our politicians dither.

Economic devastation. Political chaos. Destruction of innumerable species. Roving millions of climate migrants. Unbreathable air. Insufficient quantities of drinkable water. Intractable hunger. Entire metropolises under yards of seawater.

This is going on now. And, oh yes it will intensify to the extent the social world will look much different in even 100 years than it does now.

I must say I would have liked a book that will tell me what the world will look like when global warming is complete because that will surely shock the bejeezus out of most of us.

I think what strikes me most about the way Wallace-Wells tells his story is that climate isn’t this helpless character in a story about the human race. Nature in this story is more powerful than Poseidon himself, transforming great masses of ice into sea levels that will flood huge cities around the world.

Heat will generate more and more powerful storms, huge and I mean huge wildfires. And move human agriculture into areas it was never meant to be.

Wallace-Wells expresses hope at the end of the book — much like Tim Flannery or Bill McKibben — that the apocalypse can be averted. But we can all see with our own eyes that isn’t going to happened.

And there is not a single jurisdiction on the planet that is really planning for the inevitable. ( )
  MylesKesten | Jan 23, 2024 |
“The emergent portrait of suffering is, I hope, horrifying. It is also, entirely, elective.” ( )
  danielskatz | Dec 26, 2023 |
To be honest, the parts of this book that I did not like almost make me want to give it 2-stars, but that is unjustifiably harsh, I think.

The entire first section is, at best, 1.5 stars. I've seen reviews talking about the beautiful prose, the forceful language, etc. No. It's florid. Melodramatic. Hyperbolic in imagery, if not quite in detail (Mr. Wallace-Wells (WW) is open early on that he is describing the (scientific, respectable) worst-case scenarios, not most likely, not those based on any serious action being taken.) If you like your science presented by the most verbose, melodramatic member of your local high-school drama club, this section is for you.

He defends this approach (and, by extension, one assumes the presentation) on the logic that people haven't been paying attention. His theory is that it is because climate change is easy to ignore because it is presented so sanguinely and only as e.g. sea-level change and the occasional extra hurricane. This is... self-evidently false from An Inconvenient Truth to... what was the De Caprio movie, The 11th Hour or something like that... to pretty much every pop-article ever. Yes, actual climate scientists in actual scientific papers are "reticent", but blaming public apathy on that is, to put it kindly, a stretch.

It is in the second section where this knot gets sort-of tied: "because neoliberalism," my ongoing second most-hated "reason" (the first being the ubiquitous "them""they"".) Mostly because neoliberalism has lost most of its meaning ( )
  dcunning11235 | Aug 12, 2023 |
Visa 1-5 av 57 (nästa | visa alla)
“The Uninhabitable Earth” by David Wallace-Wells is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet: death by water, death by heat, death by hunger, death by thirst, death by disease, death by asphyxiation, death by political and civilizational collapse.
tillagd av melmore | ändraNew York Times, Farhad Manjoo (Feb 13, 2019)
 
 
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It is worse, much worse, than you think.
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"It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible. In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, "500-year" storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century. In his travelogue of our near future, David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await--food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe. But the world will be remade by warming in more profound ways as well, transforming our politics, our culture, our relationship to technology, and our sense of history. It will be all-encompassing, shaping and distorting nearly every aspect of human life as it is lived today. Like An Inconvenient Truth and Silent Spring before it, The Uninhabitable Earth is both a meditation on the devastation we have brought upon ourselves and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation"--

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