HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

February's Son (Harry McCoy, 2) av Alan…
Laddar...

February's Son (Harry McCoy, 2) (utgåvan 2019)

av Alan Parks (Författare)

Serier: Harry McCoy (2)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
446465,722 (4.22)1
The second thrilling installment in the Harry McCoy series. "McCoy is so noir he makes most other Scottish cops seem light grey."--The Times A man hangs himself in a neighborhood chapel. Bodies of young girls are being found in canals and rivers across the city with high levels of Mandrax in their bloodstream. McCoy is asked to watch over a colleague's niece, who has left home young and is running with a bad crowd in Glasgow. DS Wattie is attempting to become a sergeant. Drugs in Glasgow have got darker and more dangerous. Glasgow, its music and its inhabitants all have rough edges in this hard city fought over by gangs, organized crime, the forces of law and order, and ordinary people trying to get by.… (mer)
Medlem:jwfar
Titel:February's Son (Harry McCoy, 2)
Författare:Alan Parks (Författare)
Info:World Noir (2019), 336 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:July 22, 2021 (Kindle)

Verkdetaljer

February's Son av Alan Parks

Ingen/inga
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 1 omnämnande

Visa 1-5 av 6 (nästa | visa alla)
Over recent years, Scottish Noir has become established as a major genre within crime fiction, and the works of Ian Rankin, Stuart MacBride and Val McDermid have become bestsellers all around the world. All three of those authors have favoured dark crimes committed against grisly settings, investigated by stalwart and pragmatic cops who are prepared to cross the customary lines of propriety and fair play in order to secure a result.

Harry McCoy, protagonist of Alan Parks’ debut novel Bloody January, is another decidedly gritty detective who makes John Rebus or Logan McRae seem like Dixon of Dock Green. This book represents his second outing, following on year’s Bloody January, and transports us back to Glasgow in 1973, a city riven by crime where sectarian loyalties strike deeper and harder than anywhere else on mainland Britain.

This novel picks up more or less where its predecessor left off, with McCoy returning to work after recovering from the injuries sustained at the end of the previous story. On his first day back, he is summoned to the top floor of a half-built tower block, where a corpse has been discovered. It is immediately clear that the victim had been tortured before being killed. It is equally clear that he is a successful footballer who had established himself as a regular in the Celtic side. As if that were not enough of a problem for the police, the dead footballer was also the fiancé of the daughter of the city’s most powerful crime supremo.

McCoy sometimes seems almost to be fighting the wintry city itself, and the cold seemed to seep out of the book and engulf me as I read it. It has become rather a cliché now for fictional detectives to be at least as troubled as the criminals and victims among whom they function. McCoy is no exception, and he has enough emotional baggage to fill a freight wagon. It is also clear that he might struggle as much to spell ‘unassailable rectitude’ as he would to display it. His woes and angst are all too plausible, however, and his off-duty hours are spent drinking heavily, downing speed and consorting with prostitutes in a relentless cycle of dissolution.

At the most basic level, the plot is grim, the setting is bleak and the characters are, for the most part, ghastly. The book is, however, utterly compelling. Parks has a straightforward style that snags the reader’s attention from the start, and won’t let go. ( )
  Eyejaybee | Sep 16, 2020 |
Once again I would like to thank the Author publishers and NetGalley for providing me with a Kindle version of this excellent book to read and honestly review.
This is the second book in this series, but while there are several references to previous cases this in no way spoilt my enjoyment of a very good book, and can be read standalone as was the case with me. Set in Glasgow in the seventies this book is at times a grim read, i expect the Author is certainly not popular with Glasgow tourist board. However it's a well written descriptive and entertaining book from first to last page, difficult to put down and I for one will look out for more books from this clever writer.
WARNING : This book features very strong language and there is some graphic violence, which some readers may find disturbing.This
Totally recommended. ( )
  Gudasnu | Feb 27, 2020 |
Publisher’s synopsis:
Bodies are piling up with messages carved into their chests. Rival gangs are competing for control. New drugs have arrived in Glasgow, and they’ve brought a different kind of violence to the broken city. The law of the street is changing and demons from Detective McCoy’s past are coming back to haunt him.
Can McCoy keep his head up for long enough to deliver justice?

Set in Glasgow in 1973, this is the author’s second book in the Harry McCoy series and, although I think it would probably have been more satisfying had I read “Bloody January” first, I found there were enough clues about the main character’s backstory to be able to read this as a stand-alone novel.
It’s clear from the start that McCoy is a haunted, deeply-troubled character who is not only struggling with his return to work after undergoing the statutory three counselling sessions which followed the traumatic, violent conclusion to his last case, but also with the effects of traumatic experiences during his childhood. With a taste for booze and drugs, as well as a tendency to use his fists when dealing with recalcitrant suspects, he is an archetypical detective from an era when bending the rules and police brutality were more likely to be tolerated. Stevie Cooper, a friend from his childhood who offered vital support and protection during some difficult times, also happens to be part of the Glasgow underworld, meaning that there are times when the detective finds that personal loyalties lead to a blurring of the boundaries between licit and illicit behaviour. As something of a counter-balance to the flawed detective, Wattie, a new and rather naïve young detective, often provides a more honourable, principled voice, acting as a brake on some of McCoy’s excesses.
Although it’s apparent from the beginning who’s responsible for the brutal murders, the fact that he’s linked to the undisputed leader of Glasgow’s gangland, and that the first victim is the fiancé of this man’s daughter, means that the stakes are high in the search for the murderer. Will the police find him first or will he be found and dealt with by a father seeking to avenge his daughter’s loss?
This “Tartan noir” story is told mainly from the viewpoint of Harry McCoy, but briefly interspersed with the main narrative are insights into the psychopathic personality of the murderer, the sadistic pleasure he takes in gratuitous violence and torture and his gradually deteriorating mental state. However, he is not the only one to use violence as a means to an end as so many of the characters, on both sides of the law, appear to regard it as the “lingua franca” of their interactions, making this a very dark and disturbing story to read … Tartan-noir rather than Scandi-noir!
Although this is a well-written story which captures a highly atmospheric sense of time and place in a city rife with drugs, violence and criminal gangs, I definitely cannot describe it as an enjoyable read! There were times when I found it almost unbearable to continue reading the detailed, graphic descriptions of not only the brutal murders, but also the of the casual violence used by so many of the characters. At times it felt as though there was little difference between the behaviour of the criminals and of the police, with both sides resorting to violence, blackmail and other corrupt practices ... much of the justice meted out was definitely of the rough kind! However, I did find myself rooting for the main character and, even when I hated some of his behaviour, I at least felt able to understand why he made some of the decisions he did!
The development of the plot is satisfyingly full of twists and turns and themes contained within the story include reflections on mental illness and mental health, and the long-term effects of historic physical and sexual abuse. Each of the characters is well-developed and although the moral ambiguity of many of them (police and criminals alike!), their crude language and their gratuitous violence frequently made this a disturbing story to read, they felt very much “of their time”. I particularly enjoyed discovering the long-term significance of McCoy’s relationships with Stevie Cooper and Chief Inspector Murray and why each is such a key figure in his life. It’s difficult to go into any detail without introducing spoilers but their various interactions gave the story a psychological integrity which I found impressive ... to the extent that I now want to read the third book in the series, “Bobby March will Live Forever”, because I want to know how these relationships continue to develop!
With thanks to Readers First for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  linda.a. | Jan 27, 2020 |
Synopsis/blurb....

Bodies are piling up with grisly messages carved into their chests. Rival gangs are competing for control of Glasgow's underworld and it seems that Cooper, McCoy's oldest gangster friend, is tangled up in it all.

Detective Harry McCoy's first day back at work couldn't have gone worse.

New drugs have arrived in Glasgow, and they've brought a different kind of violence to the broken city. The law of the street is changing and now demons from McCoy's past are coming back to haunt him. But vengeance always carries a price, and it could cost McCoy more than he ever imagined.

The waters of Glasgow corruption are creeping higher, as the wealthy and dangerous play for power. And the city's killer continues his dark mission.

Can McCoy keep his head up for long enough to solve the case?

Bruised and battered from the events of Bloody January, McCoy returns for a breathless ride through the ruthless world of 1970s Glasgow.
-------------
My take......

Bloody January from Alan Parks was one of my favourite books of 2018 and I was curious to see if the second in a planned 12 book series measured up. I'm happy to report it does.

70s Glasgow, a murdered professional footballer - not just murdered but mutilated into the bargain and one with links to a heavy hitter criminal boss, Jake Scobie. Celtic player Charlie Jackson was engaged to Scobie's daughter and it looks like one of Scobie's close confidants and enforcers, Kevin Connolly has done the deed. Apparently Connolly had a thing for Elaine Scobie.

Simples then - find Connolly and close the case. If only.

Mental illness, a struck off doctor with a penchant for conducting lobotomies, unrequited love, a falling out of criminals, a picture in a paper, a suicide, a terminal illness, an obstructive lawyer, ghosts from the past, an escalation, a river rescue, family friction, an insider takeover (?), manipulation and scheming, more victims, a peeping Tom act, a hotel raid, a disturbing look inside a diseased mind, a kicking with the promise of more, some plans for retribution, a childhood bond, a busy reporter, a poorly mother, dabbling with drugs, revenge goes awry, an escalation, a funeral, a plan of action, a few bevvies, a few pies and some tension between old friends, shooting for the stars, a lucky escape, a guilty conscience and a tearful confession, and a helluva lot more going on here.

Harsh, brutal, graphic and enlightening. There's a lot of pain in this book and a lot of ghosts that get exorcised, particularly for our main character, Harry McCoy in a story strand that runs tangentially to our main aim of capturing our very obvious villain, Kevin Connolly. All the bits and bobs of the tale overlap and entwine and eventually get wrapped up with consummate skill and very satisfactorily too.

I loved the main character Harry. Parks makes us care about him and we feel his pain and the suffering the weight of his memories causes him. His casual drug use and over indulgence on occassions with alcohol is understandable and cathartic for him in many respects. That he is an honest copper mostly, is a testament to his strength and resilience. I do like the loyalty to and the interactions with childhood friend and up-and-coming major villain Stevie Cooper. I enjoy his banter with young Wattie and their partnership with Wattie feeding off the old pro McCoy and having his eyes opened to the sights and perils of big city Glasgow. I like the fact McCoy has a boss, Murray who has his back.

Looking forward to book three, whenever that drops. 2020 - hurry up!

4.5 from 5

Read in February, 2019
Published - 2019
Page count - 368
Source - review copy from publisher Canongate
Format - paperback

https://col2910.blogspot.com/2019/02/alan-parks-februarys-son-2019.html ( )
  col2910 | Feb 20, 2019 |
When Celtic's star striker is found murdered and mutilated the Glasgow police force have a pool of suspects. It's too horrific to be sectarian but given that the victim was the fiance of the only daughter of the Northside crime boss there's a big pool of suspects. This is quickly narrowed down to an ex employee. However as Harry McCoy investigates further he finds that his past and the present are set on a collision course and he may not escape.
I really enjoyed the first Harry McCoy book and this one is even better. There is a strong sense of time and place and a deft touch with the sexist, racist, homophobic nature of 1970s policing. Harry's backstory comes to the fore here and even the ending closes one circle but opens up a whole new set of possibilities for the future. This is strong writing in any genre. ( )
  pluckedhighbrow | Feb 9, 2019 |
Visa 1-5 av 6 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

Ingår i serien

Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
For Mary Mackay Robertson
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
He sits down, looks at what's he's done.
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS
Kanonisk LCC

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

The second thrilling installment in the Harry McCoy series. "McCoy is so noir he makes most other Scottish cops seem light grey."--The Times A man hangs himself in a neighborhood chapel. Bodies of young girls are being found in canals and rivers across the city with high levels of Mandrax in their bloodstream. McCoy is asked to watch over a colleague's niece, who has left home young and is running with a bad crowd in Glasgow. DS Wattie is attempting to become a sergeant. Drugs in Glasgow have got darker and more dangerous. Glasgow, its music and its inhabitants all have rough edges in this hard city fought over by gangs, organized crime, the forces of law and order, and ordinary people trying to get by.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

LibraryThing-författare

Alan Parks är en LibraryThing-författare, en författare som lägger upp sitt personliga bibliotek på LibraryThing.

profilsida | författarsida

Populära omslag

Snabblänkar

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (4.22)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5 2
4 10
4.5 2
5 4

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 163,468,258 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig