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Frankissstein : a love story av Jeanette…
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Frankissstein : a love story (utgåvan 2019)

av Jeanette Winterson, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
4333142,928 (3.78)69
Om kropparna vi lever i och om kropparna vi vill ha. Det är en regnig och kylig sommar 1816 vid Genève-sjön, där ett litet sällskap, bestående av Byron, Shelley och Mary Shelley samlas. De roar sig med spökhistorier och samtal om möjligheten att väcka en död människa till nytt liv. Till en mässa i Memphis tvåhundra år senare anländer Ry Shelley, läkare och transperson, för att studera robotars påverkan på människans hälsa. Han bekantar sig snabbt med den vackra receptionisten Claire och walesaren Ron Lord, som producerar avancerade sex-robotar, och träffar också den karismatiske Victor Stein. Jeanette Winterson har gjort ett lekfullt omtag på Mary Shelleys klassiska Frankenstein. En bok om AI och flytande könsgränser.… (mer)
Medlem:freakorlando
Titel:Frankissstein : a love story
Författare:Jeanette Winterson
Andra författare:Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Info:London : Jonathan Cape, imprint of Vintage, 2019.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:**
Taggar:2019

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Frankissstein av Jeanette Winterson

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What a strange and interesting remix on Frankenstein. Jeannette Winterson has spent her career questioning ideas of sex, gender, and identity and she does so now through the frame of Mary Shelley's classic, Frankenstein. We follow Shelley as she dreams up Frankenstein and we move to a speculative period where a trans doctor named Ry falls in love with Victor Stein, and we also meet Victor Frankenstein as a character in Shelley's story. It's a weird book, but it (mostly) works. It has certainly made me wish to revisit the original tale. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
Frankissstein explores the stories of Mary Shelley's years in Italy, where she wrote Frankenstein, and a trans doctor in the present day who forms a relationship with a scientist researching AI and how the human consciousness could eventually transcend bodies.

The novel switches between these two perspectives to meditate on a host of ideas about what makes us human, and whether we really need bodies to be who we want to be. The bulk of the novel takes the form of conversations between various characters, but there is a plot element involving the scientist's attempt to further his research.

I'm a bit torn about this novel. I enjoyed the thoughtful explorations of many fascinating ideas around human identity and consciousness. Winterson apparently spent a few years reading about AI and her research clearly shows. There's a lot of humour among the intelligent dialogue, and I really liked reading Mary Shelley's story.

However, Ry (the doctor) didn't feel as fleshed out a character as Mary Shelley to me. Their perspective is focused on their relationship with Victor, the scientist, and we don't hear much about their life outside of this. There's also a rather harrowing incident involving Ry that happens late in the novel but doesn't seem to have any bearing on the plot, making me wonder why it was necessary to include it.

I've also read the other illuminating reviews here highlighting the ignorant views of the other characters in relation to Ry. I'm cis and straight, and haven't read many novels with a trans main character (but I would really like to), and even I can understand the concerns of these reviewers. Some of the views are couched in humour, which makes them seem dangerously acceptable - so be wary of this before you go in.

I did enjoy the ideas presented in the book, and Winterson's writing is fantastic, but its flaws are a bit too big to warrant more than 3.5 stars for me. ( )
  mooingzelda | Sep 5, 2020 |
This wasn't a difficult read. I like Winterson's writing style, though I also get people scoffing at it being very ~literary~ with the lack of quotation marks and whatnot.
I really enjoyed the stuff from Mary Shelley's point of view. Her talking about what it means to be a woman and what it means to be alive while living the horror of continually losing her children in infancy - she lost three before her fourth child survived.

The modern stuff I wanted to like, I'm interested in the idea of living past our lifetimes, life extension and brain uploads etc., but the characters were weirdly one dimensional. The sexbot seller, the southern black woman leveraging sexbots for God, they didn't really do anything for me at all. Ry, the protagonist, is an interesting character. I like how they talk about gender, and they feel to me like a representation of some of the more fluid gender presentations and genderqueer identities. Unfortunately everyone else in the story treats them like a freak and doesn't respect their name and there's an awful sexual assault scene later on so whatever Ry is supposed to represent, the future of gender or the success of body modification technology or how we'll all be able to feel more comfortable with a more fluid idea of what a body can be (or the idea of not having a body at all!), the world is not at all ready for this. Ry is not allowed to be. Ry, whose last name is Shelley, is the future counterpart of Mary Shelley, who is also not allowed to be because of her gender. It's the other counterparts that don't track for me. Ron Lord, the sexbot seller and presumably the Lord Byron counterpart, kind of just feels like a juvenile dig at Byron to me? And Victor Stein, for all his talk of brain scanning and moving past our bodies, is adamant that Ry's genitals make him NOT GAY despite Ry's presentation and identity. He thinks that freeing us of our bodies will free our minds but he can't even conceive of a sexual orientation outside of STRAIGHT and GAY.

I'm not sure how much of my critiques are of the characters and how much are of the author. I can't tell what is supposed to be satire and what we're supposed to agree with. It's making me think I guess, but I don't love this kind of ambiguity when it comes to transphobia. I hope it was meant to make me uncomfortable. ( )
  katebrarian | Aug 24, 2020 |
I'm unsure what to rate this, so for now I'm not going to. I enjoyed aspects of it (the weird retelling of frankenstein in a speculative fiction setting - and how Mary Shelley's novel is interwoven with AI science/post-humanism) however the trans rep was.... not good. The trans character is written as being a non-binary trans man which is very cool, but the way it's described and talked about is just... uncomfortable (a lot of being "really" female but having ~become~ "part male"). As a non-binary trans man myself, reading this rep was incredibly disheartening. The misgendering and deadnaming is also constant (and almost played for comedy????), the mc's romantic partner fetishises the trans character (it's disgusting), and the trans character is sexually assaulted. There's also just a whole lot of transphobia and the whole thing just feels like it was handled very poorly. It could have been worse, but at this point in my life, and being a trans reader, I am sick of settling for half-assed (and ignorant) rep. We deserve better. It's a shame, because this story and concept had potential.

Trigger warning: transphobic rhetoric, transphobia, fetishizing trans character, homophobic slurs, sexual assault (on page, graphic)
  angelgay | Jul 1, 2020 |
Quite weird but v good. I hardly ever like "these characters live in different time periods and yet their stories intertwine" but I liked this. No quotation marks. ( )
  IridescenceDeep | Jun 28, 2020 |
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» Lägg till fler författare (8 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Jeanette Wintersonprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Dean, SuzanneOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Fries-Gedin, LenaÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat

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Om kropparna vi lever i och om kropparna vi vill ha. Det är en regnig och kylig sommar 1816 vid Genève-sjön, där ett litet sällskap, bestående av Byron, Shelley och Mary Shelley samlas. De roar sig med spökhistorier och samtal om möjligheten att väcka en död människa till nytt liv. Till en mässa i Memphis tvåhundra år senare anländer Ry Shelley, läkare och transperson, för att studera robotars påverkan på människans hälsa. Han bekantar sig snabbt med den vackra receptionisten Claire och walesaren Ron Lord, som producerar avancerade sex-robotar, och träffar också den karismatiske Victor Stein. Jeanette Winterson har gjort ett lekfullt omtag på Mary Shelleys klassiska Frankenstein. En bok om AI och flytande könsgränser.

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