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Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope av…
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Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope (utgåvan 2019)

av Mara Rockliff (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
3314601,646 (4.28)Ingen/inga
"Life was harsh in the town of Bialystok, particularly for a Jewish boy like Leyzer Zamenhof. But Leyzer thought he knew the reason for the anger and distrust. With every group speaking a different language, how could people understand each other? Without understanding, how could there be peace? Zamenhof had an idea: a "universal" second language everyone could speak. But a language that would be easy to learn was not easy to invent, especially when even his own father stood between him and his dream. Yet when at last in 1887 "Doctor Esperanto" sent his words into the world, a boy's idea became a community that spread across the globe."--Book jacket.… (mer)
Medlem:MissBNeedsBooks
Titel:Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope
Författare:Mara Rockliff (Författare)
Info:Candlewick (2019), 40 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:****
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope av Mara Rockliff

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I really enjoyed this biography. I think it did a good job of teaching both about the language (I loved all the examples of Esperanto words and phrases that were included) and about Leyzer Zamenhof's life. ( )
  remreader | May 25, 2021 |
Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope is a picture book, seemingly designed to engage a younger audience in discussing linguistics, language, and tolerance. While I think the book itself is long, the topic and information quite dense, and the pages word-heavy for younger audiences, I do think this book can teach a reader a lot about the language of Esperanto. The story itself is engaging, and the illustrations aid in the story-telling. For someone who has an openness to learning about languages and how they connect us, this is a great read. I would recommend it for precocious children 10 and up, as well as adults who have an interest in linguistics. ( )
  MissBNeedsBooks | Apr 12, 2020 |
This book warms my linguistic heart! It is the story of Leyzer Zamenhof (Doctor Esperanto) and how creating his language was his life work. His reason for creating the language was to bring people together in mutual understanding.

This is a great biography about Zamenhof and is beautifully written and illustrated. I recommend this for any classroom. ( )
  Rachael_Robbins | Aug 12, 2019 |
This was published by Candlewick so of course its a quality book (they sent an advanced reader to me for a review, they didn't know i would have probably bought it anyway).

Esperanto was designed/created to reverse Babel. A nineteenth century man grew up in a multi-ethnic town and heard/saw the negativeness by people not speaking a common language, he created one. The world soon adopted it and we all lived happily after.

No, but some people did believe in it and still do and still speak it. In the end notes we find out that Hitler thought it was a Jewish plot to rule the world (ever wonder what would happen if Jews actually ruled the world? 400 years of goyim and we aren't doing too good a job.)

The art and writing are pleasant and the book has a terrific bibliography. ( )
  jimvail | May 28, 2019 |
Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope by Mara Rockliff, illustrated by Zosia Dzierzawska is a children's book about how Leyzer Zamenhof created the 'language of hope' - Esperanto. During a time of great turmoil in his town of Bialystok, Poland, he wondered if a common language would bring peace. So, the young Jewish boy set to work to create what would become the most widely spoken 'conlang' in the world.

The book itself is hardcover, with an illustrated cover and a dust cover to match. The story is told over 35 illustrated pages long, with 5 pages of historical information at the end. The artwork is simply drawn and coloured with a muted watercolour effect. The language is suitable for children aged 7+.

The story is relayed in two ways. First, as a sweet and simple narration describing the world of Leyzer through both words and pictures. It would have been easy for a book about the creation of a language could be too abstract for a child, but Rockliff does a good job of giving the essence of how languages work, without making it too complex or focusing too much on linguistics. The images were well matched to help make the ideas even more clear. After the conclusion of the picture book there are two sections titled "Why Esperanto?" and "L.L. Zamenhof" that go into greater detail about the language and the man who created it. I think the additional information makes the book one that could be enjoyed over and over as a child grows in their ability to read and understand.

While I enjoyed the book, I have one criticism. In the spirit of inspiring peace and hope in children, I expected it to better represent the diversity of humans reading it. Not that I would have expected to see historically inaccurate depictions of who would have been using Esperanto at that time, but I think the book could have been more inclusive. For example, with one single exception, every individual depicted in the illustrations has light white skin tone. Realistically, the first world Esperanto congress took place in 1905 in France. 688 people were in attendance representing 20 nations. While people of colour may not have been able to attend, there could have been some variation of skin tones in the images of Zamenhof speaking with the audience. I wonder too if diversity of ability could have been represented by the inclusion of a wheelchair (already in common use in the late 19th century) or a cane? A final aspect of access that stands out has to do with language. In order to inspire all children, it is more inclusive to use variations of the term 'people' instead of binary terms like 'gentle boy or girl or man or woman'.

Reading Doctor Esperanto and the Language of Hope by Mara Rockliff was enjoyable and inspired me to read more about this time in history as well as the creative mind of L. L. Zemenhof. If she had written this book five or ten years ago, I think Rockliff would have brought the story to life. Fortunately, we are living in a time now where access and diversity are paramount. It is important for writers and artists to be part of this movement too. I think that Rockliff and Dzierzawska could have been more conscious of the decisions they made in the telling of this story in order to truly inspire peace and hope in the children they are creating for. ( )
  BookNeurd | May 24, 2019 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Mara Rockliffprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Dzierżawska, ZosiaIllustratörmedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
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"Life was harsh in the town of Bialystok, particularly for a Jewish boy like Leyzer Zamenhof. But Leyzer thought he knew the reason for the anger and distrust. With every group speaking a different language, how could people understand each other? Without understanding, how could there be peace? Zamenhof had an idea: a "universal" second language everyone could speak. But a language that would be easy to learn was not easy to invent, especially when even his own father stood between him and his dream. Yet when at last in 1887 "Doctor Esperanto" sent his words into the world, a boy's idea became a community that spread across the globe."--Book jacket.

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