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Repentance av Andrew Lam
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Repentance (urspr publ 2019; utgåvan 2019)

av Andrew Lam (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
206879,330 (3.5)Ingen/inga
Sometimes the line that separates coward from hero is not easy to spot.When that line is crossed, to what lengths will a remorseful man go to set things right?That's a question that had never crossed Daniel Tokunaga's mind until the U.S. government started calling, wanting to know more about his father's service with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II. Something happened while his father was fighting the Germans in France, and no one is sure exactly what.At least, no one who's still alive and willing to give details.Wanting answers, Daniel upends his life to find out what occurred on a small, obscure hilltop half a world away, in a quest for the truth that threatens his marriage, his sanity, and the love of everyone he holds dear. In unraveling his family's catastrophic past, the only thing for certain is that nothing--his life, career, and family--can ever be the same again.… (mer)
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This is an incredibly intense and emotionally charged story. It hooked me from the first page. Daniel is a skilled cardiac surgeon, and well respected in his field. His personal life is a not as clean cut as in the operating room. Daniel’s relationship with his father has been strained for decades. As we get to know his father, we learn of Ray’s experience in WWII with the 442nd battalion. The battalion was made up of Japanese American soldiers and is one of the most highly decorated battalions in military history. Ray won’t speak of his time with the 442nd, but Daniel finds out he received an award for bravery. And the story rolls out from there. It is an emotional rollercoaster, full of deception, bravery, love, duty, honor and yes, repentance. The book kept me fully engaged with the characters and with the surprises around each corner. Highly recommended! ( )
  Sue.Mc | Mar 13, 2021 |
Nicely written book about estranged Japanese American family. Daniel is a successful doctor. He does not often keep in touch with his family. Daniel thinks his father was too strict when he was growing up and they don't seem to agree on anything. Then something happens and Daniel finds out that his father kept secrets after he came back from France after WW2. The secrets are revealed in the book. I don't understand Ray's motivations for keeping secrets, but for him they were constant reminder of war and loss.
The 442nd Regimental Combat Team mentioned in this book is real and consisted of Asian American men who fought bravely in WW2 and received decorations for their service.
Thankyou LibraryThing and Tiny Fox Press LLC for a copy of this book. ( )
  Helsky | Sep 26, 2020 |
Nice and quick read about a part of WW2 history I did not know much about. The story flows nicely, except maybe at the end, where there are quite a few plot twists and coincidences, before the story is wrapped up. In the end, I'm happy to habe received a copy of the book through Early Reviewers. ( )
  SimoneA | Jun 3, 2019 |
This book focuses on an American family and a strained relationship between a father and son. The father was a veteran of WWII and member of the 442nd, an army regiment of 2nd generation, Japanese-Americans. The story jumps back and forth from contemporary times to moment of the father’s time during WWII. While I enjoyed the content and story I found it somewhat lacking in the telling. The dialogue felt contrived and forced and filled with clichés. I found myself wanting more details related to the history of the 442nd, it felt as though the author was in a rush to get the story written without great concern for the aesthetic. Perhaps intentional, to make the story more relateable. Still, the story as a whole is interesting and there are poignant moments that I feel helped redeem the book, from its at times simplicity. It didn’t grab me until close to the end, but still worth the read for a look into an often neglected group in America’s history. ( )
  Jewlzee | May 25, 2019 |
“The fact that they had nothing to do with Pearl Harbor didn’t matter. They were guilty by association, by the color of their skin and the slant of their eyes. It didn’t matter that they didn’t speak Japanese, or that they were American citizens. The bottom line was that their kind had perpetrated a horrid crime that came from the land of their ancestors. The shame was a burden that all Nisei silently bore, a burden every soldier in the 442nd was fighting to be free of.”



I got this book for free as a win from LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers program. Thanks!


“Repentance” tells the story of Daniel Tokunaga, a successful surgeon, who is confronted with his estranged father’s past during the Second World War. Daniel’s father is of Japanese descent and fought as part of the 442nd Infantry Regiment, the most decorated unit in U.S. military history.

During (mostly) alternating chapters narrating of 1944 (Daniel’s father and his best friend) and 1998 till 1999 we learn a lot about Daniel and his own family as well.

Even though Lam doesn’t have his own style, his writing is fairly well, at times very atmospheric and – in the respective context – mostly absolutely plausible and believable. Lam’s prose at times feels even poetic:



“The house sucked up his voice, offered no return. […]

The house was a time capsule. A grave, he thought. Even a clock’s tick would have been welcome music. The dead room gave Daniel the creeps. Inside, the distant pulsation of the cicadas felt far away. Inside, time had died—life gone elsewhere. Even the past had passed on.”



Especially the war time perspective is brilliantly developed and I found ourselves immersed in the narration:



“The horror of their situation now dawned on Ray. Unable to advance, unable to retreat, six guys left against four machine guns, one of which they couldn’t see but which could see them the minute they lifted their heads or stepped out from behind a tree.”



Why then only three stars? There are two issues with this book: First of all, “Repentance” is missing the chance to tell the story of the 442nd – why did it become the most decorated unit? Why did those Nisei fight so valiantly? Lam could have elaborated on this beyond the rather simplistic direct answer he gives himself:


“The fact that they had nothing to do with Pearl Harbor didn’t matter. They were guilty by association, by the color of their skin and the slant of their eyes. It didn’t matter that they didn’t speak Japanese, or that they were American citizens. The bottom line was that their kind had perpetrated a horrid crime that came from the land of their ancestors. The shame was a burden that all Nisei silently bore, a burden every soldier in the 442nd was fighting to be free of.”



Especially in the light of Americans of Japanese descent being held in civilian internment under harsh conditions, why would people volunteer to fight and die for the country that did that to them? The book leaves us without even trying to explain that.

The story “Repentance” tells us is a powerful one and it would certainly have been possible to highlight the special challenges that the Nisei faced in the USA before, during and – in part at least – after World War II. I for one would have been interested to learn more about that.

In the author’s “Historical Notes” there is indeed additional information about the 442nd but it comes too late (it should have been interwoven in the story) and it’s too little to make any great difference.



The second issue I have is with Daniel, the protagonist, himself: When he learns about a family secret his father, Ray, has kept, Daniel is very, very quick to condemn Ray. No doubt, under the specific circumstances Daniel is sad and confused and he says so:


“He closed his eyes and exhaled deeply. “I still can’t wrap my head around the stuff with my dad. It’s just so bizarre.””



That is wholly understandable and believable. Nevertheless, he completely condemns his father and is generally awfully quick to judge:

“No wonder his father hadn’t wanted the government to investigate his medal. Because he hadn’t earned it…worse, he’d lied […]”

Not quite the next second but at most hours later, he clearly identifies with his father again:



“Celeste, I would love to tell you about my dad. I’m very proud of him.”



Daniel actually “oscillates” between blaming his father for everything gone wrong in both their lives and blaming himself. Both with equal vigour and both implausibly quickly, often in the course of hours:



“As Daniel perused his dad’s archive of his life, he felt a deep sense of regret. Was it my fault for keeping us apart all those years? Was it me who robbed both him and my children of a relationship they could have shared? And Daniel realized, it was.”



“No, Daniel”, I want to shout, “it’s at most partly your fault but mostly your father who tried to mould you into the unrealistic picture he imagined someone else would have been having of you.” (Yes, the convoluted wording has a very good reason.)

In the relationship between the parent and a child, it’s extremely rarely the child to blame for the major failures.

Neither is it possible for anyone burdened like Daniel is to follow his wife’s - Beth - trivial advice:



“You can do it differently. Start right now. Just start by being a person who’s not carrying a burden. Now that we know where that burden came from, why don’t you put it down and leave it there?”



No, Beth, you can’t just put such a burden down and move on. If things were so easy, a lot of shrinks would be out of a job.


All in all, “Repentance”, in spite of the shortcomings I mentioned, is a well-written, interesting book that could have achieved more but can still be recommended to anyone with an interest in historical fiction and especially those interested in World War II. ( )
  philantrop | May 7, 2019 |
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Sometimes the line that separates coward from hero is not easy to spot.When that line is crossed, to what lengths will a remorseful man go to set things right?That's a question that had never crossed Daniel Tokunaga's mind until the U.S. government started calling, wanting to know more about his father's service with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II. Something happened while his father was fighting the Germans in France, and no one is sure exactly what.At least, no one who's still alive and willing to give details.Wanting answers, Daniel upends his life to find out what occurred on a small, obscure hilltop half a world away, in a quest for the truth that threatens his marriage, his sanity, and the love of everyone he holds dear. In unraveling his family's catastrophic past, the only thing for certain is that nothing--his life, career, and family--can ever be the same again.

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