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Piranesi: ‘Spectacular’ The Times av…
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Piranesi: ‘Spectacular’ The Times (utgåvan 2020)

av Susanna Clarke (Autore)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,497868,931 (4.22)101
Piranesi lives in the House. Perhaps he always has. In his notebooks, day after day, he makes a clear and careful record of its wonders: the labyrinth of halls, the thousands upon thousands of statues, the tides that thunder up staircases, the clouds that move in slow procession through the upper halls. On Tuesdays and Fridays Piranesi sees his friend, the Other. At other times he brings tributes of food and waterlilies to the Dead. But mostly, he is alone. Messages begin to appear, scratched out in chalk on the pavements. There is someone new in the House. But who are they and what do they want? Are they a friend or do they bring destruction and madness as the Other claims? Lost texts must be found; secrets must be uncovered. The world that Piranesi thought he knew is becoming strange and dangerous. The Beauty of the House is immeasurable ; its Kindness infinite.… (mer)
Medlem:Jazzishot
Titel:Piranesi: ‘Spectacular’ The Times
Författare:Susanna Clarke (Autore)
Info:Bloomsbury Publishing (2020), Edition: 01, 272 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Piranesi av Susanna Clarke

  1. 70
    Min morbror trollkarlen av C. S. Lewis (Michael.Rimmer)
  2. 40
    Slade House av David Mitchell (CGlanovsky, jonathankws)
  3. 40
    House Of Leaves av Mark Z. Danielewski (hubies)
    hubies: Piranesi is not scary, but in both books there is this mystifying, unpeopled world of impossible (and perhaps infinite) house-like space. Also: cryptic diary entries, unstable mind, short film as a plot device.
  4. 30
    Den hemliga historien av Donna Tartt (sparemethecensor)
  5. 10
    Det vita rummet av Christopher Priest (tetrachromat)
  6. 00
    Anubisportarna av Tim Powers (fluxpin)
    fluxpin: Similar atmosphere, though taken in a somewhat different direction.
  7. 00
    Wittgenstein's Mistress av David Markson (defaults)
  8. 00
    Collected Fictions av Jorge Luis Borges (jakebornheimer)
  9. 00
    The Magician av W. Somerset Maugham (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Aleister Crowley-esque figure
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» Se även 101 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 85 (nästa | visa alla)
Very artificial, abstract and desultory, even absurd. Includes profanity. Breaks too many rules but never justifies the contraventions. Doesn’t deliver an absorbing narrative.
  AAAO | May 11, 2021 |
Piranesi, a young man, lives in a landscape of huge echoing halls and vestibules filled with statues, surrounded by the sea, which enters the lower parts of the building complex with the ebb and flow of the tides. He has only one living human companion with whom he meets once or twice a week. He catches fish and mussels, dries seaweed as both food and fuel, is grateful to the Other for any little gifts, like some sneakers, and will do the Other's bidding with no hesitation. They are friends! Little more can be said without spoiling, the story is densely interwoven, not linear (which one can set forth without fear of spoilage). My guess is that Clarke is exploring the limits of the imagination, that place where the mind and 'reality' (ha! is there anything more subjective?) mix and muddle. Can full-on open-ended belief create reality? Is this what is meant by magic? How does what we think affect what we see? Who we are? Clarke's magic is so so dangerous. Nothing good will happen to those who enter in the wrong spirit. I loved this undercurrent in "Strange and Norell" and I see the same basic questions being explored more deeply here. Thus the reader's ability and willingness to ask themselves where they set that line will determine how they react to Piranesi. The one thing a reader mustn't do with this novel is think they know better than Clarke when it comes to the borders between the imagination and reality. Writers who explore this same region and come right to mind are Calvino and Borges. I might even reread this, something I rarely do. Brava! ***** ( )
  sibylline | May 10, 2021 |
Piranesi - not his real name - is a meticulous, self-sufficient inhabitant of a world that is an endless classical house full of statues; the lower level is taken up by seas, the upper level by clouds and birds. Piranesi and the Other are the only inhabitants of the World (or the House, which is for all intents and purposes the same), as far as Piranesi knows; there are also the bones of thirteen other humans, which Piranesi visits and cares for. Piranesi keeps a careful journal (and an index to his journals), and his journal entries make up the narrative of the book; the reader experiences the World as Piranesi does, slowly learning that there is more beyond the House's endless halls (the reader has hints of this through the difference between Piranesi's resources and the Other's; Piranesi fishes for his food and uses seaweed inventively, while the Other is always well-dressed and groomed). Piranesi is shocked to learn that there is a sixteenth person, and is eager to meet them, but the Other tells him 16 is wicked, and will make Piranesi go mad if he speaks to them. Yet when Piranesi does encounter a stranger, who he calls the Prophet, he begins to question what the Other has told him, and goes back through his journals to discover the truth.

The premise hinges on "transgressive thinker" Laurence Arne-Sayles and his circle of acolytes, and the academics curious about the mysterious disappearances that befell them. In seven parts and less than 250 pages, this book feels as expansive as a door to another world itself.

See also: The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern, Slade House by David Mitchell, Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson, The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow, His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman

Quotes

It is my belief that the World...wishes an Inhabitant for Itself to be a witness to its Beauty and the recipient of its Mercies. (12)

I can see that it is in the nature of men to prefer one thing to another, to find one thing more meaningful than another. (17)

This realisation...came to me in the form of a Revelation. What I mean by this is that I knew it to be true before I understood why or what steps had led me there. (60)

Two memories. Two bright minds which remember past events differently. (71)

"But it seemed to me that the wisdom of the ancients could not have simply vanished. Nothing simply vanishes. It's not actually possible. I pictured it as a sort of energy flowing out of the world and I thought that this energy must be going somewhere. That was when I realised that there must be other places, other worlds. And so I set myself to find them."
"And did you find any, sir?" I asked.
"I did. I found this one. This is what I call a Distributary World - it was created by ideas flowing out of another world. This world could not have existed unless that other world had existed first." (the Prophet, 89)

After some time has passed it is easier to separate the important from the ephemeral. (102)

...Arne-Sayles talked about the other world (a place where architecture and oceans were muddled together) and how it was possible to get there. (107)

I felt a great pressure there as if a whole host of half-formed ideas were about to break through into my consciousness, bringing with them more madness or else understanding. (108)

Laurence Arne-Sayles began with the idea that the Ancients had a different way of relating to the world, that they experienced it as something that interacted with them. When they observed the world, the world observed them back....
Eventually the Ancients ceased to speak and listen to the World....there was...an actual, real disenchantment. (147-148)

Theory of Other Worlds...when knowledge or power went out of this world it did two things: first, it created another place; and second, if left a hole, a door between this world where it had once existed and the new place it had made. (151) [analogy of rainwater seeping down and creating caves] Like the entrance to an underground cave it might be in danger of collapse. But it would be there. And if it was there, it was possible to find it. (151)

...I had a long drink of water. It was delicious and refreshing (it had been a Cloud only hours before). (163) ( )
  JennyArch | May 5, 2021 |
I almost abandoned this one because the beginning world building was boring / not my cup of tea but I'm glad I stuck around for the second half because it was worth the read.

Piranesi is a deeply unsettling look at ego, mental health, and epistemology, though the central mystery doesn't pick up or help you make any concrete connections until you're well into the novel. It's quite short compared to Jonathan Strange, and while these books have some overlapping themes, Piranesi is a genre-bending oddball book.

Clarke probably accounts for 80% of all usage of the word "vestibule" ever written in just this book alone, be forewarned. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
Piranesi is the keeper of an enormous, labyrinthian house whose walls are lined with thousands of statues. An ocean is imprisoned within the house, the tides causing it to hurl against the walls, flood the rooms, and crash up the staircases. Piranesi, the only regular inhabitant, has learned to watch the tides and predict when it's time to climb higher. His only "friend" is a man he calls the Other, who visits twice a week. He engages Piranesi to help him with research into what he calls A Great and Secret Knowledge. The Other warns him to stay away from a person he refers to as Sixteen, someone from the outside world who may be coming soon. Piranesi is torn between the warnings and his desire to meet someone who can tell him more about the other world.

Susanna Clarke has created an eerily beautiful setting and gives us a story that combines fantasy and mystery. Who is Piranesi, and how did he come to be in this place? I have to admit that I was swayed by the hype and the top Audie award to pick up this book on audio. I'm not generally a fan of either of the above genres, so while the book kept me engaged, it was just an OK experience for me. ( )
  Cariola | Apr 27, 2021 |
Visa 1-5 av 85 (nästa | visa alla)
Here it is worth reflecting on the subject of Clarke's overt homage. The historical Piranesi, an 18th-century engraver, is celebrated for his intricate and oppressive visions of imaginary prisons and his veduta ideate, precise renderings of classical edifices set amid fantastic vistas. Goethe, it is said, was so taken with these that he found the real Rome greatly disappointing. Clarke fuses these themes, seducing us with imaginative grandeur only to sweep that vision away, revealing the monstrosities to which we can not only succumb but wholly surrender ourselves.

The result is a remarkable feat, not just of craft but of reinvention. Far from seeming burdened by her legacy, the Clarke we encounter here might be an unusually gifted newcomer unacquainted with her namesake's work. If there is a strand of continuity in this elegant and singular novel, it is in its central pre-occupation with the nature of fantasy itself. It remains a potent force, but one that can leave us - like Goethe among the ruins - forever disappointed by what is real.
 

» Lägg till fler författare (2 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Clarke, Susannaprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Ejiofor, ChiwetelBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Finke, AstridÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Mann, DavidOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Molnár, Berta EleonóraÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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"I am the great scholar, the magician, the adept, who is doing the experiment. Of course I need subjects to do it on".

The Magician's Nephew, C. S. Lewis
"People call me a philosopher or a scientist or an anthropologist. I am none of those things. I am an anamnesiologist. I study what has been forgotten. I divine what has disappeared utterly. I work with absences, with silences, with curious gaps between things. I am more of a magician than anything else."

Laurence Arne-Sayles, interview in The Secret Garden, May 1976
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When the Moon rose in the Third Northern Hall I went to the Ninth Vestibule to witness the joining of three Tides.
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The Beauty of the House is immeasurable; its Kindness infinite.
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Piranesi lives in the House. Perhaps he always has. In his notebooks, day after day, he makes a clear and careful record of its wonders: the labyrinth of halls, the thousands upon thousands of statues, the tides that thunder up staircases, the clouds that move in slow procession through the upper halls. On Tuesdays and Fridays Piranesi sees his friend, the Other. At other times he brings tributes of food and waterlilies to the Dead. But mostly, he is alone. Messages begin to appear, scratched out in chalk on the pavements. There is someone new in the House. But who are they and what do they want? Are they a friend or do they bring destruction and madness as the Other claims? Lost texts must be found; secrets must be uncovered. The world that Piranesi thought he knew is becoming strange and dangerous. The Beauty of the House is immeasurable ; its Kindness infinite.

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