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Reino De Este Mundo av Alejo Carpentier
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Reino De Este Mundo (urspr publ 1949; utgåvan 1983)

av Alejo Carpentier (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
9471716,420 (3.74)88
A few years after its liberation from French colonialist rule, Haiti experienced a period of unsurpassed brutality, horror, and superstition under the reign of the black King Henri-Christophe. Through the eyes of the ancient slave Ti-Noel, The Kingdom of This World records the destruction of the black regime--built on the same corruption and contempt for human life that brought down the French--in an orgy of voodoo, race hatred, erotomania, and fantastic grandeurs of false elegance.… (mer)
Medlem:BelenD
Titel:Reino De Este Mundo
Författare:Alejo Carpentier (Författare)
Info:Editorial Seix Barral, S.A. (1983)
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Riket av denna världen av Alejo Carpentier (1949)

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    The Pyramid av Ismail Kadare (wandering_star)
    wandering_star: The scene with the building of the Citadelle in Carpentier's work reminded me very much of the building of the Pyramid.
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» Se även 88 omnämnanden

engelska (12)  spanska (2)  nederländska (1)  Alla språk (15)
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This is a modern classic by Cuban writer Alejo Carpentier about the revolution in Haiti. First published in 1949, this is not a book that would be written today; it's overwhelmingly male-oriented, with women existing mainly as objects of lust, prostitutes or to rape. And there's some interesting phrasing around issues of race. But setting that aside, this is an interesting look a the first successful slave rebellion in the western world.

The novel is told primarily through the eyes of an enslaved Black man named Ti Noel, who witnesses the first attempts to break free, lives through the successful revolt, accompanies the man who enslaved him to Cuba and finally returns to Haiti, where he lives through the oppressive reign of Henri Christophe and long after, always just trying to live free in that corner of Haiti he considers home. This is a slender novel that packs a lot in, provides a lot of information while being full of action, magic realism and life. ( )
1 rösta RidgewayGirl | Feb 16, 2021 |
Entre los veinte garañones traídos al Cabo Francés por el capitán del barco que andaba de media madrina con un criador normando...
  socogarv | Feb 4, 2021 |
Historical fiction meets magical realism in this short novel about the 1803 Slave uprising in Haiti and the rulers that followed. Sad story but since it's told from the point of view of a slave of that time period it's sprinkled with magical voodoo and naive hope. The writing style reminded me of reading Greek and Roman mythology. ( )
  technodiabla | Jan 12, 2017 |
Alejo Carpentier was a political radical who had to spend quite a bit of his life in exile outside Cuba, but his project in writing about Haiti was more aesthetic than directly political. He was keen to contribute to the development of a specifically Latin American literature, reflecting his view that the American view of the world differed from traditional European views because of the role of collective belief (both indigenous and arising from African-derived ideas like Santeria and Voudou), which could create a kind of objective reality for fantastic events (lo real maravilloso). For him the key thing about the Haitian revolution thus seems to be the interaction between political and mythical elements in shaping the awareness of the people. He was clearly also influenced very heavily by his recollections of some of the sites he visited on his famous trip to Haiti in 1943, especially Henri-Christophe's palace and fort. Instead of a linear account of the events, we get a fragmented, impressionistic view, where we see a few key incidents from the points of view of relatively unimportant characters, giving Carpentier the possibility to abstract and generalise in a way that wouldn't be possible in a classic non-fiction account or a traditional historical novel. The result is very interesting and colourful, and it seems to achieve what Carpentier intended, but of course it lacks one of the important things you normally look for in a historical novel, the opportunity to identify with the characters. ( )
  thorold | Dec 29, 2015 |
In the forward, Edwidge Danticat says "Alejo Carpentier allows us to consider the possibility - something which his own Cuba would later grapple with - that a revolution that some consider visionary might appear to others to have failed." And so it is that a successful slave rebellion against French colonial rule leads to a brief but brutal regime led by a former slave, which in the end, leads to the emergence of mulattoes as the ruling class. Carpentier blends magical realism with historical events in a believable way and takes the reader to the darker side of Haiti.

Macandal had not foreseen this matter of forced labor. Nor had Bouckman, the Jamaican. The ascendancy of the mulattoes was something new that had not occurred to Jose Antonio Aponte, beheaded by the Marquis of Someruelos, whose record of rebellion Ti Noel had learned of during his slave days in Cuba. Not even Henri Christophe would have suspected that the land of Santo Domingo would bring forth this spurious aristocracy, this caste of quadroons, which was now taking over the old plantations, with their privileges and rank.

Try as he would, Ti Noel could think of no way to help his subjects bowed once again beneath the whiplash. The old man began to lose heart at this endless return of chains, this rebirth of shackles, this proliferation of suffering, which the more resigned began to accept as proof of the uselessness of all revolt.
( )
  nittnut | Feb 16, 2015 |
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» Lägg till fler författare (12 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Alejo Carpentierprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Danticat, EdwidgeInledningmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
de Onis, HarrietÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
栄一, 木村Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
渡, 平田Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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Of the twenty stallions brought to Cap Francais by the ship's captain, who had a kind of partnership with the breeder in Normandy, Ti Noel and unhesitatingly picked that stud with the four white feet and rounded crupper which promised good service for mares whose colts were coming smaller each year.
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Wikipedia på engelska (1)

A few years after its liberation from French colonialist rule, Haiti experienced a period of unsurpassed brutality, horror, and superstition under the reign of the black King Henri-Christophe. Through the eyes of the ancient slave Ti-Noel, The Kingdom of This World records the destruction of the black regime--built on the same corruption and contempt for human life that brought down the French--in an orgy of voodoo, race hatred, erotomania, and fantastic grandeurs of false elegance.

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