HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Lune sanglante av James Ellroy
Laddar...

Lune sanglante (urspr publ 1984; utgåvan 2001)

av James Ellroy (Auteur)

Serier: Lloyd Hopkins (1)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
522735,957 (3.32)21
Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins can't stand music, or any loud sounds. He's got a beautiful wife, but he can't get enough of other women. And instead of bedtime stories, he regales his daughters with bloody crime stories. He's a thinking man's cop with a dark past and an obsessive drive to hunt down monsters who prey on the innocent. Now, there's something haunting him. He sees a connection in a series of increasingly gruesome murders of women committed over a period of twenty years. To solve the case, Hopkins will dump all the rules and risk his career to make the final link and get the killer.… (mer)
Medlem:Juliette31
Titel:Lune sanglante
Författare:James Ellroy (Auteur)
Info:Rivages (2001), 286 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Blodröd måne av James Ellroy (1984)

Ingen/inga
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 21 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins seems to be a genius at his job but so much in his private life. But his insight provides a link with the deaths of females over the last twenty years if only he could convince his superiors to provide the manpower.
Strangely I think overall I really enjoyed the book, but it had its moments when I was not too sure of that. ( )
  Vesper1931 | Jul 29, 2021 |
A man has been brutally murdering women over many years and getting away with it because no one has ever connected the deaths as each murder is quite different from the last. But police detective Lloyd Hopkins notices something at one wrongful death that leads him to connecting the pieces. Can he also find out who the killer is before more innocent people are consigned to death?

So, I had previously read Ellory's L.A. Quartet books and had enjoyed them for the most part. There were certainly some problematic parts, with racist and misogynist language being big on that list, but I felt those could be chalked up to showing a seedier side of the so-called "good old days." On the whole, the mysteries and characterizations were compelling enough to overpower the issues. So I thought I might try this other series as well.

Well, here is a different story altogether. The book immediately opens with a gratuitous scene of physical and sexual violence that is unsettling. (Further acts of violence are later included; while also bloody and gross, these seem to fit the narrative a bit better and are somewhat less disturbing.) The narrative then shifts awkwardly to race riots, which really have very little to do with the rest of the book and seems to just be an excuse for Ellory to drop the n-word repeatedly.

The rest of the book then takes places in the 1980s (aka the same time it was being written) so there's really no reason for the outdated misogyny and fake morality to be so prevalent. The fact that Hopkins has his career on the line because he's cheated on his wife is so contrived. Yes, I know the 80s weren't a pinnacle of wonderfully glorious times and attitudes either, but much of it felt like Ellory's formula for the books set in earlier times and it just doesn't work well here.

The characterizations felt choppy at best; Hopkins and the killer are the only ones really given much development and even that is pretty bare bones. In fact, it's more like "back story" than development as "development" would imply some kind of growth or change. Side characters are exactly that -- there just to move the narrative forward and equally able to change personalities as needed for the story to proceed.

The story itself is not that compelling either. This book is decidedly not a mystery because you see from the killer's point of view and know who he is stalking and even why he is doing the things he does; the only thing you don't know is his actual name (although you know all the other details of his past and present situations, such as the high school he attended and his place of work). As this is an Ellory book, you also know that somehow or other Hopkins will put the pieces together eventually; it's just a matter of how and when. Sometimes such a device can work well, but here it sort of fell flat. It should have ramped up the suspense but instead it all felt so inevitable.

Ellory is definitely talented as a writer, and you can see some of the literary devices he was going for, such as setting up Hopkins and the killer as mirrored foils. But this book just doesn't have enough value to outweigh the cons. I won't be continuing on with this series.

Note: the audiobook narrator did a good job, but he could not save a bad book. ( )
  sweetiegherkin | Mar 19, 2020 |
When James Ellroy wrote his third novel, he was a long way from developing the unique skills that makes his later fiction so compelling. "Blood on the Moon" is interesting as the work of a fascinating writer in embryo; it's not interesting or rewarding in its own right. The trouble is in his characters, who don't behave, talk, or act in realistic ways. In particular, the main female character seems like a lonely teenager's idea of an intelligent woman, her words (especially her poems and journal entries) all in feverish early high-school style. The villain also seems like a surly freshman's fantasy alter ego, twisted, powerful, and (of course) self-loathingly gay. Where the later Ellroy largely omits psychologizing in favor of ultra-concise description and expertly deployed violence, here we have to suffer through long passages of purple thought passages that are just icky where they should be terrifying. Fortunately, there is better to come. ( )
  john.cooper | Dec 6, 2017 |
If you are an Ellroy fan, you will probably notice his style in this the first of the “Lloyd Hopkins” books. Set in the seedy parts of Los Angeles Lloyd Hopkins is a hard boiled detective. The whole tone of the book is noir and Ellroy has a style of writing that is very visceral – it drives home the violence and the darkness with such authority that you don't realize how tense you have been until you put the book down.

Lloyd is married but he has a complicated relationship with his wife and several other women in the book including his daughters. Ellroy's mother was killed in Los Angeles around the time the Black Dahlia murder occurred. There is a lot of Freudian working it out with the mother figure in all his books but the true delight of that is that the women are complicated.

This book extends that theme. There are the hopeful Hollywood wannabe's; the sometimes straight sometimes lesbian poetess; the loving wife who is getting fed up with Lloyd and the daughters whose bed time stories consist of Lloyd descriptions of all the gruesome goings on in the City of Angels.

To top off the mayhem, there is a crazy serial killer and a bunch of people both legal and illegal tainted by all the sex, drugs, violence and corruption that Hollywood can offer. Included in this group is Lloyd's actual family which is as complicated and dysfunctional as Lloyd.

This a solid three and a half stars. It's early Ellroy so the style is still raw but you can see the beginnings of what will be classic Ellroy writing style. Good book. ( )
  ozzieslim | Jun 16, 2016 |
Ellroy writes with intensity. As I’m sure everyone knows who is remotely interested in his writing, Ellroy has been obsessed with the death of his mother (nee Hilliker) whose murder was never solved. The Black Dahlia, written after this book, was an unsatisfactory attempt at atonement, and the books I’ve read of his continue to obsess with familial relationships.

That’s especially true of Blood on the Moon, first in the Lloyd Hopkins police series. Lloyd is that special cop who sees beyond the obvious and has a brilliant track record catching the bad guys. But his relationship with Janice, his wife, whom he loves, and his children, whom he wishes above all to protect by telling them stories of his life on the streets lest they experience them themselves, and his senile parents whom he promised to keep in their home, and his brother who he coerces to maintain them --“are you going to kill me Lloyd when our parents are dead?” Why? because of some incident at Christmas when Lloyd was 8, even if it was rather horrific, and the women he saves and sleeps with. All of these relationships form a convoluted psyche that Ellroy explores brilliantly, I think. Lloyd’s affair with Kathleen, a former schoolmate and now feminist bookstore owner reveals his “rapacious ego” and driven obsession as a foil to the obsession of the serial killer, whom Lloyd believes to be a gay man driven to kill women because of his own tormented self-identity.

Hints to Ellroy’s obsession with the death of his mother abound on the pages. At one particularly gruesome homicide, Lloyd cuts down the 29-year-old female victim, before the ME has had a chance to check out the scene, cradles her body in his arms, and murmurs how he won’t let her murderer go free and he’ll render justice. It reeks of romance, vengeance, and an idealized perception of women. We learn the origin of Lloyd’s obsessive behavior toward the end of the book, although I found the scene less than convincing. His relationship with Kathleen also had a surreal quality to it that I thought jarred with the rest of the book.

There’s a thread in modern detective literature that the bad guys can’t get caught unless the rules are broken. Lloyd certainly breaks many of them in his own personal vigilante quest for his personal justice. It’s a theme I find insidiously subversive, and really if Lloyd had followed the rules in this book the carnage would have been much less. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
The bay trees in our country are all withered, / and meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven; / the pale face moon looks bloody on the earth, / and lean look'd prophets whisper fearful change.  --  Shakespeare / Richard II
Dedikation
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
In Memory of  / KENNETH MILLAR / 1915-1983
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Friday, June 10th, 1964 was the start of a KRLA golden oldie weekend.
Citat
Avslutande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
(Klicka för att visa. Varning: Kan innehålla spoilers.)
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Kanonisk DDC/MDS
Kanonisk LCC

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska (2)

Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins can't stand music, or any loud sounds. He's got a beautiful wife, but he can't get enough of other women. And instead of bedtime stories, he regales his daughters with bloody crime stories. He's a thinking man's cop with a dark past and an obsessive drive to hunt down monsters who prey on the innocent. Now, there's something haunting him. He sees a connection in a series of increasingly gruesome murders of women committed over a period of twenty years. To solve the case, Hopkins will dump all the rules and risk his career to make the final link and get the killer.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Populära omslag

Snabblänkar

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.32)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5 1
2 10
2.5 7
3 40
3.5 11
4 35
4.5 2
5 6

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 163,377,286 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig