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Third girl av Agatha Christie
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Third girl (1966)

av Agatha Christie

Serier: Ariadne Oliver (6), Hercule Poirot (34)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
2,530414,181 (3.39)80
Three single girls share a London flat. The first works as a secretary; the second is an artist; the third, who comes to Poirot for help, disappears believing she is a murderer. There are rumors of revolvers, flick-knives, and blood stains. But, without hard evidence, it will take all Poirot's tenacity to establish whether the third girl is guilty, innocent or insane.… (mer)
Medlem:Bob_In_Trouble
Titel:Third girl
Författare:Agatha Christie
Info:London : Planet Three Publishing Network.
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Tredje flickan av Agatha Christie (1966)

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engelska (37)  spanska (1)  franska (1)  danska (1)  Alla språk (40)
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I love mysteries but this one just dragged. Too many times Hercule Poirot went over the facts, wasted too much time thinking how great a thinker he should be. I guessed part of the mystery way too soon. ( )
  kshydog | Dec 13, 2020 |
In which Poirot and Mrs. Oliver pursue an unknown crime, and an unknown perpetrator, and the dreaded young generation.

No good. It’s always interesting to see Poirot – whose liveliness in the ’20s and ’30s has naturally subsided – having to deal with the ‘modern generation’ but, unfortunately, Christie herself still seems to be dealing with them. As a result, "Third Girl" comes off as unaware and confused about itself. The nature of the mystery uses a number of plot elements from previous novels without every distinguishing it.

The Suchet adaptation was passable, although far from the best, and that’s not surprising: very little happens in this novel, and what does happen is eminently forgettable. For Christie fans only.

Poirot ranking: 34th out of 38. ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
Terrific, and a lovely break from the book before it (I put down, metaphorically, an audiobook version of Gallows Court which I did not care for, largely because of the narrator, actually, and picked up, metaphorically, an audiobook version of Third Girl with such a good narrator that I'm seeking out his other work—he seems to specialize in Christie).

And I'm partial to Ariadne Oliver, so anything she shows up in is an extra treat. The attempt at modernity didn't bother me (it seemed apt, for the time period—youth were certainly openly trying drugs, and dressing in their own fashions, instead of aping the look of their elders). But mostly it just flowed, and breathed, and I wondered what happened next throughout (or what had happened, it's a mystery after all)—it held my interest—I was close to the solution by the end, but had only worked out about 1/3 of it, so there were still surprising payoffs.

(I've only actually guessed fully right on a Christie novel once before, out of about 80, so even randomly you'd think I'd do better. She has wonderful misdirection).

And I'd thought I'd read every single thing she'd written (save the romances), but I'm pretty sure this was new to me. Not one character or incident tweaked a memory. So it was a delight to get to gobble up a new Christie, after so long!

(Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s). ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Oct 13, 2020 |
"Third Girl" was a strange and dispiriting journey for me.

At the start of the book, I was pleasantly surprised at the contemporary (1960's) feel of the novel. There was much more humour in it than I'd expected but there was also more violence and a deeper sense of threat than in other Poirot novels I've read.

I loved the opening where Norma, (a young woman who is constantly referred to as a girl) interrupts Poirot's breakfast, insisting that she needs to talk to him about a murder and then leaves without giving him any details, telling him that, having met him face to face, she can see he's too old to be able to help her. This was a splendid inversion of the Philip Marlowe type of opening scene where the femme fatale uses her allure to get the hard-bitten gumshoe's help. It was also perfectly calculated to ensure Poirot's enthusiastic engagement.

I also greatly enjoyed seeing the inimitable and indomitable Adriadne Oliver playing detective. She was a complete hoot, a wonderful example of misplaced confidence arising from a broad imagination married to narrow experience.

All the best scenes in the book had Adriadne in them. Her presence brought the dialogue alive. She's so much easier to like than Poirot and her pen sketches of the young people in the allegedly swinging London of 1966 were refreshing: the young man with the pretty hair and the gaudy clothes that she calls "The Peacock", the artist working in oils that she refers to simply as "The Dirty One" and the young model who she describes as throwing herself into Burne-Jones poses with admirable flexibility. There's no malice here, just a naive observation by someone who has no qualms about not being in tune with the times.

I had no idea what was going on or how the plot strands would come together but I was enjoying the journey.

By the time I was midway through the book, my disappointment had begun. I continued to enjoy Poirot's dry wit, Ariadne's blustering slapstick and the carefully nuanced descriptions of people's characters but those things began to be outweighed by the large chunks of clumsy plot exposition that even Hugh Fraser's narration couldn't make interesting. I was also starting to be irritated by the deeply conservative attitudes towards gender and mental health. I felt as though I was dipping blindly into a box of Bertie Bott's Every Flavour Beans: I might get something that made me smile or something that made me want to wash the taste away.

The last third of the book was a chore. There were repeated attempts at sharing Poirot's thought processes, which was irritating as they were mostly plot recaps, lacked any analysis and reached no conclusions. The psychiatrist who is instrumental in resolving the plot managed, despite having all the credibility of a cardboard cutout, to be deeply offensive both as a person and as a mental health practitioner.

The plot, when it finally emerged from the detritus-ridden undergrowth we had all wriggled through, was moderately clever but was spoiled for me by one of the early Mission Impossible TV Series moments when a mask is pulled off a main character and he or she is instantly revealed to be someone else. This was limp at best.

What disappointed me even more than the cheat in the big reveal was the way in which Norma was treated. The outcome stretched my willingness to suspend disbelief and angered me because it so demeaned the woman who, as the novel progressed moved from main character to semi-plausible plot-device, to the punchline of a French farce.

If this has been my first Agatha Christie, it might well have been my last. As it is, I'm going to read "The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd" in the hope of demonstrating to myself that Poirot stories once had substance. ( )
  MikeFinnFiction | Oct 6, 2020 |
Well I admit I like the cover of this book. Some of the Christie covers by HarperCollins have been pretty great. Other than that, this was a pretty average mystery novel.

The character of Poirot has descended into even more pompousness if possible. After a young woman comes to Poirot saying that she has murdered someone, and runs away after realizing that he is old (yeah that happened) Poirot is aggrieved by the encounter. A chance phone call by Mrs. Oliver leads Poirot to figuring out who the mysterious girl is and who is it that she has murdered.

The secondary character of Ariadne Oliver who helps Poirot ferret out the truth has gotten less ridiculous in these books. What will always be really funny about this character is that she is a stand in for Agatha Christie. Mrs. Oliver writes very popular detective stories starring a Swedish detective. And just like Agatha Christie, criticizes her creation because she one hundred percent dislikes him. Frankly I think that is pretty apparent in the last couple of Poirot books where you have other characters criticizing Poirot either by how he looks (a very old man with dubious dye on his head) or that he has gotten rounder over the years.

When we have Poirot and Mrs. Oliver investigating this mysterious girl who is a third girl living in a flat with two other girls (a new living arrangement that started in the 1960s with young women living together into converted flats) Poirot and Mrs. Oliver seemed to have stumbled onto something dark and mysterious.

The writing was good, I did laugh a few times at comments that Mrs. Oliver and Poirot made of the younger generation living in London at the time. Apparently neither literary character were fond of people dressing as if they were homeless or dirty. And there were a couple of comments made about beatniks and the Beatles that had me laughing. One does feel for Poirot since his character seems lost in this new post War World II society. I am realizing that at this point Poirot has to be in his 70s or 80s. Reading about the drug using youth in England at the time was definitely interesting.

The flow was off though and I think that was because we had so much going on with an additional character that was plopped in (Dr. John Stillingfleet) and we had Poirot and Mrs. Oliver subtly interviewing people around the mysterious third girl.

The setting really doesn't come into play here. I always think that in most Christie books except for a handful she really doesn't play up enough about the surroundings the characters inhabit unless it is a house or train. I miss her locked door mysteries a lot. She seemed to take more care in planning them and making them plausible.

That leads to the lackluster ending. The last few Poirot books have been kind of annoying to me as a reader because Poirot always reveals something that it is not known to the reader. I think of it as a cheat, because if you had the same information you could have figured out who did it and why as well. That is the most fun part for reading these books for me. Trying to figure out the who and the why. As it was once again the plot was reduced to absurdity when you figure out the who and the why. And we have seemed to resurrected another plot element she has used in the last few books. Considering that there is only one more Poirot book to go, Elephants Can Remember, before Curtain, I wonder if old school Christie is going to pop up soon. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
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» Lägg till fler författare (16 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Agatha Christieprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Fraser, HughBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Janus, EddaÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Laurel, FaithOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Tetri, LauraÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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Wikipedia på engelska (1)

Three single girls share a London flat. The first works as a secretary; the second is an artist; the third, who comes to Poirot for help, disappears believing she is a murderer. There are rumors of revolvers, flick-knives, and blood stains. But, without hard evidence, it will take all Poirot's tenacity to establish whether the third girl is guilty, innocent or insane.

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