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The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit,…
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The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods (urspr publ 1921; utgåvan 1992)

av OP A. G. Sertillanges (Författare), Mary Ryan (Översättare), SJ James V. Schall (Förord)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
604828,661 (4.34)2
"Fr. Sertillanges's teachings are as timeless as any truths which describe the genuine nature of things. . . . This book is highly recommended not only for intellectuals, but also for students and those discerning their vocation in life."--New Oxford Review "[This] is above all a practical book. It discusses with a wealth of illustration and insight such subjects as the organization of the intellectual worker's time, materials, and his life; the integration of knowledge and the relation of one's specialty to general knowledge; the choice and use of reading; the discipline of memory; the taking of notes, their classification and use; and the preparation and organization of the final production."--The Sign… (mer)
Medlem:hthomas
Titel:The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods
Författare:OP A. G. Sertillanges (Författare)
Andra författare:Mary Ryan (Översättare), SJ James V. Schall (Förord)
Info:The Catholic University of America Press (1992), Edition: Reprint, 264 pages
Samlingar:Boxes, Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods av A. G. Sertillanges (1921)

Senast inlagd avbruedinger, crouse459, privat bibliotek, PlatoCult, explorer436, Marco357, cm2x

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Pretty OK! It's half manual for structuring one's life as an intellectual, half love poem to Thomas Aquinas. I did a lot of skimming if I saw the word "God" on the page more than three times. There's lots of good, actionable advice in here (as well as lots of bad, vague advice -- thankfully it seems easy enough to separate the wheat from the chaff). ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
ER-2
  Murtra | Dec 3, 2020 |
I have found it essential to have a flour sifter whose colour and brand status fits in with whatever mood I happen to find myself in. I have had a small outhouse and glass and wrought iron access walkway built to house the 87 sifters and 587 salt and pepper grinders without which civilised life would be utterly untenable. Different sifters for different types of ingredients. Too many flour sifters is the yeast of most people’s problems. We are more worried about having enough dough. No! I’m fine thanks I even gave up ironing (I bought one of those vertical ironing steamers) so me and my stuff are equally crinkled and cluttered. Imagine rolling up your pants and socks ffs! Seriously, better things to do in life than stand there all day pressing things that you are just going to crinkle again. Still some folk say it is deeply calming but who wants a calm pair of jeans! Every time you go out, ironers are silently judging your unkempt appearance, scoosh. Ah, anyone who has time to think about this old biddy's appearance possibly needs more to do - so glad they at least have ironing in their life. I judge them not.

A tidy mind is a vessel of sterility and intolerance. It is true, a mind which cannot accept or absorb extraneous information, which is seen as superfluous and unnecessary: the type which never remembers birthdays. Better yet - try to avoid accumulating so much junk in the first place. Instead of cheap souvenirs take a picture, for example. Step back from the gift shop. Find what clothes you look best in and throw away/donate the clothes you don't look good in and resolve to only buy new clothes that (a) fit your body as it is now and (b) coordinate nicely with what you own.

Discipline your acquisitions.
One pair of sunglasses?
Anyone that tidy needs to see a good psychiatrist.
Again.

Why would anyone need more than one pair of sunnies? Because they're always getting mislaid. Then the sun comes out, you can't see a thing, and you're running around trying to buy a new pair, only to find that the choice is between 100 Euros or a pair that looks like they should be accessorised with a white stick and a Labrador.

Sertillanges makes me feel guilty sometimes. This might be the umpteenth time I've read his "The Intellectual Life" one of all-time favourites and every time I find something that resonates differently. I'm a terrible chucker-outer. Mrs. Owl and the junior owls are always asking where stuff is and I have to fib and say I don't know, rather than 'fess up and say it's gone in the bin. I have to say I do feel a bit guilty when small Owl says, lip a-tremble, 'Mummy, where is the lovely pencil holder I made you from an egg-box?'

That depends what sort of person you are. If you are creative, a 'maker' or builder, you need what a (in my opinion) more boring person would dismiss as 'junk' or 'clutter'. I'm sick of seeing TV makeover shows that consign shelves full of books or drawing material to a skip, (presumably), to be replaced by something ecru, or parents who moan at their kids for spreading toys out on the floor or on open shelves.

I struggle to think of any artistic person I know of that doesn't have a cluttered house of some kind! There's a 4-year old arty type living here at the moment and the whole place is an obstacle course of paper, crafty bits, bags, cables, candles, condiments, ornaments, Lego pieces, and whatnot on the floor. Every so often we have a big 'blitz' where we sort the whole place out (usually when someone comes to visit, wouldn't be fair to subject others to our, ahem...'creative workspace') but more and more I feel that life is just too short to worry about tidying. In the 'after' "photo" I see on those TV show my wife likes to watch ("Extreme House Makeover" and such - I don't remember their names...), the bookshelves are practically empty. Why do you consider that 'good'? And "Clearing out the kitchen cupboards made space for the glasses my parents gave us as a housewarming gift"! What is she going to live on, microwave meals and tap water?

Spring cleaning was about delousing after winter, not becoming a monk.

I recommend working on the basis of two numbers which you should be able to estimate:

A how many books do you read per year?
B how many years do you expect to live?
A x B = the number of books you're going to have time for, excluding things like dictionaries, cookbooks and the like.

In my case that's 100 x 30 (optimistic the latter) so I've got time for another 3000 books before I die (I know I’m a bit Draconian in the terseness - but I think the approach still works for most novels and other books that only work as a cover-to-cover read. For me the real point is recognising that if you can only fit another 3000 such reads in before you go, they'd better be worth it, and so don't now feel the need to plough on through things that aren't working for me after the first 25% or so). Now think about the books you've got and how many of that number you want to take up with rereading any of them. Then give the ones that don't make the cut to charity and get on with re-reading the rest. And I am being very strict with myself about not buying books. It's a struggle, but I am coping. ;-) Yes it's hard isn't it ... I am having to operate a 'one in one out' policy' in our house and the 'are you really going to read this again before you die' test works for me as an incentive to pass it on before it even gets onto the shelves. As I'm in the middle of a load of books that have been hanging around for several decades, I will not be taking advice.

I've just ditched my TV (again) well... access to TV stations that is. It sucks up time: one show turns into five and that’s your evening gone. On what? Finding out what happens in a rubbish TV you're only watching because it’s on? No ta! I used to have some really good "Decluttering the Mind" and "Tidy-up Your Mind" books with some great tips, but for the life of me can't lay my hands on them now. The only the remains is my faithful Sertillanges.

"The Intellectual Life" by Sertillanges, "How to Read Books" by Mortimer Adler and "The Educated Imagination" by Northrop Frye are the ones I keep re-reading over and over again. ( )
  antao | Dec 14, 2019 |
This is a beautiful book. If your motivation the pursuit of truth, this is a guide and a call to live that vocation.

I had this book on my "to read" list for a while, and when I heard it recommended again recently, I checked it out from my local library. 30 pages in, I ordered my own copy, and when it arrived, started over, from the front, highlighter in hand.

If truth--not merely facts--drives your intellectual life Sertillanges is an encourager and aid to regain focus. He challenges our tendency to self-distraction, which unfortunately is encouraged at every turn by many forces in our culture. He reminds us that to create anything worthwhile takes time and focus.

This is not your typical productivity book. He freely admits that a life dedicated to pursuing truth will probably not bring you fame and fortune. He admits that many of us can't even make it our day job. This is not a book about how to out-pace the competition. It is a exhortation to be true to the call to pursue truth.

Some of his advice may seem quant--notecards for taking notes and organizing them. But his principles are timeless. (And to be fair, index cards don't crash or get corrupted by an update!)

This will be a book that I will re-read, not so much for his bits of practical advice, though they are good reminders to keep me on track, but more so to rekindle my love of truth from his very contagious love for it. ( )
  Moellering | Aug 27, 2019 |
Several chapters relate directly to Work
  holycrossabbey | May 6, 2019 |
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"Fr. Sertillanges's teachings are as timeless as any truths which describe the genuine nature of things. . . . This book is highly recommended not only for intellectuals, but also for students and those discerning their vocation in life."--New Oxford Review "[This] is above all a practical book. It discusses with a wealth of illustration and insight such subjects as the organization of the intellectual worker's time, materials, and his life; the integration of knowledge and the relation of one's specialty to general knowledge; the choice and use of reading; the discipline of memory; the taking of notes, their classification and use; and the preparation and organization of the final production."--The Sign

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