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Drottning för ett tag : Henrik VIII:s sex hustrur

av Karen Lindsey

Andra författare: Suzanne Heiser (Omslagsformgivare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
247879,573 (3.79)9
"The women who wed Henry VIII are remembered mainly for the ways their royal marriages ended: divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived. This book helps to restore full humanity to these six fascinating women by applying the insights of feminist scholarship. Here they appear not as stereotypes, not simply as victims, but as lively, intelligent noblewomen doing their best to survive in a treacherous court." "Divorced, Beheaded, Survived takes a revisionist look at 16th-century English politics (domestic and otherwise), reinterpreting the historical record in perceptive new ways. For example, it shows Ann Boleyn not as a seductress, but as a sophisticate who for years politely suffered what we would now label royal sexual harassment. It presents evidence that the princess Anne of Cleves, whom Henry declared ugly and banished from his bed, was in fact a pretty woman who agreed to the king's whim as her best hope for happiness."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (mer)
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This was somewhat interesting, but lacking in many areas. I found it mostly to be about Henry. Surprisingly Anne Boleyn was portrayed as not the harridan we are normally led to believe.

The fact that Catherine of Aragon never once believed that it was Henry who was doing all those hideous things to her was totally amazing (read stupid), she loved him until the end and blamed all on the Boleyn.

Anne of Cleves survived quite well....as did Katherine Parr.

There wasn't much at all bout Jane Seymour or Katherine Howard......

In my opinion the book was lacking, but that might because in that era unless a woman was actually Royalty in and of their own right, they were merely political pawns of their families, much like cattle to be sold to the highest bidder. ( )
  Auntie-Nanuuq | Jan 18, 2016 |
Okay, I should preface by saying that I am a history junkie, and that Tudor England is my drug of choice. Seriously, it’s like my crack. I know all the major players, I know how most historians view each person, I know who participated in who’s downfall. I’m the person to go to for any Tudor related question. I’m also the person who loved the tv show The Tudors because of all the sexy men but grumbled about the historical accuracies, mostly due to the timeline. Also, I love the Spanish Ambasador Chapuys. He was so witty. In life, and on The Tudors.
Now, I know what some of you are thinking. Jenn, if you know so much about Tudor history, why do you still read about it. Well, the obvious answer is, like I already mentioned, it’s like crack to me. The not obvious answer is that it had a lot to do with the whole feminist reinterpretation. I agree with the feminist movement to an extent but I’m not on board with radical feminism, which is what I was expecting. Boy, was I surprised.
Karen Lindsey has done her research and done it well. But rather than pick sides like most historians do, and back only her side, she explains what most (or, frankly just some) historians think, and why she differs with it. She paints all his wives in a more human light than history tends to do. She wrote a very factual text that was interesting, witty and dare I say, fun to read.
Even though the title referenced only the wives, I was pleasantly surprised to find the opening chapter was on Margaret Beaufort (Henry’s grandmother) and the final chapter was on how his three children, and briefly his great-niece Jane Grey, took the throne.
The only qualms I had with the writing was that the author chose to spell the name of Anne Boleyn as “Ann”. It was very distracting. There is some historical debate about the correct spelling of the last name, while Anne was at the French court as a child, she commonly wrote her last name as “Bullen” which would be an almost French pronunciation of the English spelling. But the spelling of her first name has, to my knowledge, never been debated. I double checked with the bibliography included in the back of the book and each book referencing her was spelled as “Anne”. My only guess was that perhaps she didn’t want Boleyn to be confused with the fourth wife, Anne of Cleves or the “heretic” Anne Askew who appears during the time of his sixth wife.
Whatever the reason, I found it very distracting, like I already mentioned and it seemed to make chapters 2-4 kind of drag for me. But once Jane Seymour (wife number three) came into the picture, the pace seemed to pick back up, so I think the fault was my own.
The only other problem that I had was that she included a chapter on Anne Boleyn titled “The Great Whore”. I know that some have referenced her as such in history, but it seemed odd to me that one would chose that chapter title in a feminist reinterpretation. She goes on in later chapters to praise Katheryn Howard’s (wife number 5) ability to be ahead of her time in embracing her sexual desires rather than agreeing to be merely just a political pawn in a patriarchal society. The juxtaposition left me a bit confused.
But all in all, it’s a great read, if history is your thing. Really the only wife that things worked out for was Anne of Cleves (wife number four). I give this book 4 dog eared pages.
  jennladd | May 4, 2011 |
Sarcastic and informal (wives are "dumped," royals are "tricked out" in finery), spends far too much time on the broad outline of events and draws only superficial conclusions about these women, mostly involving conjecture about their emotional states (here she must have been sad, there sympathetic, now reassured). A "feminist reinterpretation" is a wonderful premise, and I'd like to see it taken up again by another historian who can invest in it a level of depth and thoughtfulness Lindsey fails to. ( )
1 rösta afinpassing | Oct 17, 2010 |
I was a little disappointed by the fact that I wouldn't consider a feminist interpretation more than a personal interpretation. However, I still enjoyed the book. She definitely was on Anne Boleyn's side and expressed more sympathy for her than some of the other authors whose books I have read. ( )
  mallinje | May 5, 2010 |
This book was feminist claptrap. The author is not a trained historian and her feminist bias was obvious throughout this book. All the women were GOOD, and all the men were BAD, and Lindsey went to great lengths to show them as being this way all the time, and made up flimsy excuses when the women (rather than the men) behaved badly. She excused Catherine Howard's adultery on the grounds that her life would have been "unbearable" if she couldn't get all the sex she wanted. She also completely ignored any evidence that did not suit her premise. For example, she claimed Catherine Howard did not care for her lover and was only using him for sex, and didn't even bring up the love letter she is known to have written him, where she said she missed him so much and thought her life was very unfortunate when he could not be around her.

This is not history, this is feminist propaganda disguised as history. There are many other better Henry VIII books out there, such as Antonia Fraser's. I suggest the reader go to them first before venturing into this book. ( )
1 rösta meggyweg | Mar 4, 2009 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Karen Lindseyprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Heiser, SuzanneOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
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Who Was Who in the World of Henry VIII
Reading Tudor history is facinating, but dizzying. There are so many events following closely on one another and so many people involved in them. Compounding the confusion is the fact that most of these people shared the same small handful of names. There are a dozen Anns and Catherines and Janes, Edwards and Henrys and Charleses.
Introduction
I became interested in the women of Tudor England at around the same time I began my activism in, and writing for, the women's movement—in the early 1970s, when the BBC did it magnificent series The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R, about Henry's daughter, the splendid monarch wo dubbed herself a "prince."
Prologue
The word kingmaker conjures up the image of the Earl of Warwick, striding magnificently through Shakespeare's plays dealing with the Wars of the Roses. Arrogant, charismatic, ambitious, and brilliant, Richard Neville did indeed turn Edward of York into King Edward IV.
Chapter 1
The Daughter of Spain
If Catherine of Aragon had been the eldest instead of the youngest daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, she might be remembered not as the discarded consort of a marriage-addicted king but as the powerful queen regnant of Spain, following in the footsteps of her formidable mother and altering the course of sixteenth-century European history.
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"The women who wed Henry VIII are remembered mainly for the ways their royal marriages ended: divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived. This book helps to restore full humanity to these six fascinating women by applying the insights of feminist scholarship. Here they appear not as stereotypes, not simply as victims, but as lively, intelligent noblewomen doing their best to survive in a treacherous court." "Divorced, Beheaded, Survived takes a revisionist look at 16th-century English politics (domestic and otherwise), reinterpreting the historical record in perceptive new ways. For example, it shows Ann Boleyn not as a seductress, but as a sophisticate who for years politely suffered what we would now label royal sexual harassment. It presents evidence that the princess Anne of Cleves, whom Henry declared ugly and banished from his bed, was in fact a pretty woman who agreed to the king's whim as her best hope for happiness."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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