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The Great Indian Novel av Shashi Tharoor
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The Great Indian Novel (urspr publ 1989; utgåvan 1989)

av Shashi Tharoor (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
5561631,880 (3.76)41
In this award-winning novel, Tharoor has masterfully recast the two-thousand-year-old epic, The Mahabharata, with fictional but highly recognizable events and characters from twentieth-century Indian politics. Nothing is sacred in this deliciously irreverent, witty, and deeply intelligent retelling of modern Indian history and the ancient Indian epic The Mahabharata. Alternately outrageous and instructive, hilarious and moving, it is a dazzling tapestry of prose and verse that satirically, but also poignantly, chronicles the struggle for Indian freedom and independence.… (mer)
Medlem:MichaelKelly
Titel:The Great Indian Novel
Författare:Shashi Tharoor (Författare)
Info:Penguin Books (2014), 423 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Novels India

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The Great Indian Novel av Shashi Tharoor (1989)

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» Se även 41 omnämnanden

engelska (14)  franska (2)  Alla språk (16)
Visa 1-5 av 16 (nästa | visa alla)
Part two of my recently read trilogy of alt-mythologies is Shashi Tharoor's The Great Indian Novel. This is actually something of a mashup, the characters and happenings of the Sanskrit epic The Mahabharata neatly meshed with Indian politics leading up to independence and onwards to the 1970s.

The story is told as if narrated by one of the central-but-never-too-involved characters late in his life to a gruff younger man. This conceit works in the novel's favour, as the narrator is happy to digress, apologise, digress again, and then, when the story's perspective seems to lift to an omniscient third person view beyond any mortal sights, he'll respond to his typist's incredulous eyebrows with a pithy explanation of how he knows what he's narrating.

The Mahabharata was written around two thousand years ago, and the story it tells probably pre-dates that by another millennium. So it's not surprising that the characters and occurrences in the poem don't match up perfectly with the key figures and goings-on of twentieth century Indian politics. And yet, fittingly given the book's cyclic themes, these temporally disparate stories do match up just enough that a skilled weaver of tales could create something magnificent from their blend. And Shashi Tharoor has some mad weaving skills.

There's a catch, of course. Isn't there always when you're faced with a brilliant story, brilliantly told? I know just enough about Indian politics around the independence-era to avoid looking like a dolt when talking to my Indian friends, but I'd never even heard of The Mahabharata until I picked up this novel. The story itself is probably worth reading without knowing any of these things. But I found it ever more fascinating, and was better able to appreciate Shashi Tharoor's accomplishment, when I badgered my Indian chums (and Wikipedia) for the details of The Mahabharata and the intricacies of the Indian independence movement. If you know the poem, the history, and the country, then read this book. If you don't then kidnap an Indian who knows all these things, and then read this book. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Part two of my recently read trilogy of alt-mythologies is Shashi Tharoor's The Great Indian Novel. This is actually something of a mashup, the characters and happenings of the Sanskrit epic The Mahabharata neatly meshed with Indian politics leading up to independence and onwards to the 1970s.

The story is told as if narrated by one of the central-but-never-too-involved characters late in his life to a gruff younger man. This conceit works in the novel's favour, as the narrator is happy to digress, apologise, digress again, and then, when the story's perspective seems to lift to an omniscient third person view beyond any mortal sights, he'll respond to his typist's incredulous eyebrows with a pithy explanation of how he knows what he's narrating.

The Mahabharata was written around two thousand years ago, and the story it tells probably pre-dates that by another millennium. So it's not surprising that the characters and occurrences in the poem don't match up perfectly with the key figures and goings-on of twentieth century Indian politics. And yet, fittingly given the book's cyclic themes, these temporally disparate stories do match up just enough that a skilled weaver of tales could create something magnificent from their blend. And Shashi Tharoor has some mad weaving skills.

There's a catch, of course. Isn't there always when you're faced with a brilliant story, brilliantly told? I know just enough about Indian politics around the independence-era to avoid looking like a dolt when talking to my Indian friends, but I'd never even heard of The Mahabharata until I picked up this novel. The story itself is probably worth reading without knowing any of these things. But I found it ever more fascinating, and was better able to appreciate Shashi Tharoor's accomplishment, when I badgered my Indian chums (and Wikipedia) for the details of The Mahabharata and the intricacies of the Indian independence movement. If you know the poem, the history, and the country, then read this book. If you don't then kidnap an Indian who knows all these things, and then read this book. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
This is a book from 1001 list and it is a satire that covers the time period or English imperialism (1930s, WWII, Independence, Ghandi, Nehru, Indira Ghandi) to the post Indira Ghandi. The book is written in structure like Mahabharata with 18 chapters and characters that r/t those in Mahabharata and those of actual history. Sometimes you can guess who the characters are. If you want help, the wiki page has a great chart. I enjoyed reading this book about Ghandi, Nehru, Indira and learning about the history of India's independence and why India has developed as a nation the way that it has. I also enjoyed the many references in the book to other books. I've read many books about India but this one is comprehensive and well worth tracking this book down to read. ( )
  Kristelh | May 1, 2020 |
>  Dans une note liminaire, l’auteur prévient : « Le Grand Roman Indien doit son titre non pas à l’évaluation que l’auteur fait de son contenu, mais à un hommage rendu à sa source première d’inspiration, l’ancien poème épique du Mahâbhârata ». En sanscrit, maha - veut dire « grand », Bharata désigne l’ancêtre des héros du Mahâbhârata, roi de la tribu des Kurus, et l’Inde à laquelle il a donné son nom. Ce roman, construit en dix-huit chapitres, comme l’épopée, raconte la lutte entre deux clans rivaux, celui de Gandhi et celui de Jinnah (Mohamed Ali Kama dans le texte), son origine et sa préparation, lutte aboutissant à la partition au moment de l’Indépendance. On retrouve les acteurs de l’épopée transposés dans l’Inde bouillonnante du XXe siècle ; par exemple, Gangâ, « Mère de l’Inde »: Gandhi ; Dhritarashtra : Nehru, chef des Kauravas et père de Duryodhani (Indira Gandhi). Et bien d’autres. L’auteur connaît bien et le Mahâbhârata et l’histoire de l’Inde contemporaine. Son récit est bien mené, mélangeant avec adresse et verve prose et rimes ; la traduction est excellente. --Revue Française de Yoga, n°19
  Joop-le-philosophe | Oct 6, 2019 |
A good friend recommended this and I said, "Sure, Sure," and forgot about it for six months. When I finally felt sufficiently obligated to read it I sped through this alternate history of India; intoxicating is too small a word. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Jul 3, 2016 |
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In this award-winning novel, Tharoor has masterfully recast the two-thousand-year-old epic, The Mahabharata, with fictional but highly recognizable events and characters from twentieth-century Indian politics. Nothing is sacred in this deliciously irreverent, witty, and deeply intelligent retelling of modern Indian history and the ancient Indian epic The Mahabharata. Alternately outrageous and instructive, hilarious and moving, it is a dazzling tapestry of prose and verse that satirically, but also poignantly, chronicles the struggle for Indian freedom and independence.

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