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Rule Number Two: Lessons I Learned in a…
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Rule Number Two: Lessons I Learned in a Combat Hospital (utgåvan 2012)

av Heidi Squier Kraft (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
926235,588 (4.09)8
When Lt. Cmdr. Kraft's twin son and daughter were fifteen months old, she was deployed to Iraq. A clinical psychologist in the US Navy, Kraft's job was to uncover the wounds that a surgeon would never see. She put away thoughts of her children back home, acclimated to the sound of incoming rockets, and learned how to listen to the most traumatic stories a war zone has to offer. One of the toughest lessons of her deployment was perfectly articulated by the TV show M*A*S*H: "There are two rules of war. Rule number one is that young men die. Rule number two is that doctors can't change rule number one." Some Marines, Kraft realized, and even some of their doctors, would be damaged by war in ways she could not repair. And sometimes, people were repaired in ways she never expected.--From publisher description.… (mer)
Medlem:swbaker
Titel:Rule Number Two: Lessons I Learned in a Combat Hospital
Författare:Heidi Squier Kraft (Författare)
Info:Back Bay Books (2012), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Rule Number Two: Lessons I Learned in a Combat Hospital av Heidi Squier Kraft

  1. 00
    In the Land of Invisible Women av Qanta Ahmed (infiniteletters)
    infiniteletters: Contrasting cultures, but similar medical perspectives. Do no harm.
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Although a tear jerker, this book wasn't very well written. Half way into the book, Dr. Kraft finally gets to "Rule Number Two," and she doesn't really go into detail on how it applies to her experiences. I read the book thinking it would be more of a scientific observation of combat psychology, but it ended up being just another personal memoir. Now I did learn something reading this book, but not what I expected to learn, and nothing too important. ( )
  Mackey_Attackey | Oct 25, 2020 |
The U.S. Navy is deploys Doctor Kraft, a Lieutenant Commander in to Iraq to provide clinical psychologist services to men and woman in combat. Stationed in Al Asad, she is part of a Marine Corp medical team providing emergency triage and medical services. Kraft conveys the agony separate from family and children faced by her and others. The vivid descriptions highlight the heat, dust, and insects take on a body. Flak and Kevlar seemed insufficient when incoming artillery shells hit nearby. Physical and mental wounds are common but not everyone survives to make it home and some that do will never be whole again. War is ugly and Dr. Kraft shares her experience dealing with the mental anguish that is hard from those who have not experience it to understand. ( )
  bemislibrary | Dec 31, 2017 |
Clinical Psychologist Dr. Heidi Squier Kraft was a clinical psychologist at the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, FLA. She along with several other medical personnel were being sent to Iraq. This was in 2003 in the early days of Operation Iraqi Freedom during which many such teams had already been deployed and some had returned to a different world.

Her greatest initial challenge was preparing herself for her separation from her children but before a few weeks were up she was entrenched in a MASH unit that deep in the combat zone of Iraq, which was being bombarded daily and receiving mass casualties and missing her family. “In a world where rockets exploded randomly nearby, I decided I could not be a combat psychologist and a mother at the same time. I had to be one or the other. I had no choice. I put their pictures away.”

And so she and her team began their grueling ordeal of tending to the mental and emotional problems of wounded marines, shocked survivors of terrible traumas as well as being on hand for the difficulties of the medical teams themselves who were experiencing events that were new to them all. Kraft’s book is filled with stories that make you reflect.One soldier said “No one wants to hear what we do over here. Even people who love us. They think they do, but they don’t.’

Hawkeye Pierce of the TV show M*A*S*H was counseled by his Colonel about the rules of war. :
Rule number one is that young men die.
Rule number two is that doctors can’t change rule number one.

This microcosm of the war can be summed up in one phrase “ We did the best we could.”

10% of the profits of Rule Number Two go to the Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund provides financial assistance to: Marines injured in combat and in training and other service members injured while in direct support of Marine units and their families.

( )
  Condorena | Apr 2, 2013 |
Kraft was a navy psychologist who was sent to Iraq for 7 months. This memoir recounts her deployment. She and her team seem to have spent much of their time doing immediate response for medical traumas, some critical incident debriefing, emergency psychiatric evaluation, and regular appointments. This is described against the backdrop of Kraft's wrenching separation from her young twins.

I would have wished for more technical descriptions of the therapeutic work. While Kraft goes into her countertransference and other emotional responses, I'd have liked to read about this in a deeper context, even if it was in composite cases ( )
  OshoOsho | Mar 30, 2013 |
Heidi Kraft was a US Navy psychologist happily married to a Marine and raising her 15 month old twins when on short notice she was shipped out to Iraq to be part of a medical support team for combat troops (think M*A*S*H*, only in Iraq). While there she kept a journal to help her keep her sanity and when she came home she used that journal to write this book. The book is written in episodic fashion, giving us an understanding of what life is like for both the Marines and the Navy medical support teams. This form lets us see both the horrific aspects and some of the redeeming episodes that keep both the military personal and the reader able to bear the story. Occasionally there is even a little humor. This book is not long and was a fairly quick read for me. As Elie Wiesel does in [Night], Kraft gives us enough to understand the horror she lived through without overwhelming us or making us numb.

Bottom line:

This book is a paean to the human spirit, to the military who serve our country in combat zones and the people who are there to support them both physically and mentally when they need it. Highly recommended ( )
  MusicMom41 | Jul 24, 2009 |
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When Lt. Cmdr. Kraft's twin son and daughter were fifteen months old, she was deployed to Iraq. A clinical psychologist in the US Navy, Kraft's job was to uncover the wounds that a surgeon would never see. She put away thoughts of her children back home, acclimated to the sound of incoming rockets, and learned how to listen to the most traumatic stories a war zone has to offer. One of the toughest lessons of her deployment was perfectly articulated by the TV show M*A*S*H: "There are two rules of war. Rule number one is that young men die. Rule number two is that doctors can't change rule number one." Some Marines, Kraft realized, and even some of their doctors, would be damaged by war in ways she could not repair. And sometimes, people were repaired in ways she never expected.--From publisher description.

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