HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

Poetry and Prose

av Walt Whitman

Andra författare: Se under Andra författare.

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,082813,747 (4.4)3
This is the most comprehensive volume of Walt Whitman (1819-1892) ever published. It includes all of his poetry and what he considered his complete prose. This is also the only collection that includes, in exactly the form in which it appeared in 1855, the first edition of Leaves of Grass. This was the book, a commercial failure, that prompted Emerson's famous message to Whitman: "I greet you at the beginning of a great career". These twelve poems, including what were later to be entitled "Song of Myself" and "I Sing the Body Electric", and a preface announcing the author's poetic theories, were the first stage of a massive, lifelong work. Six editions and some thirty-seven years later Leaves of Grass had become one of the central volumes in the history of world poetry. Each edition involved revisions of earlier poems and the incorporation of new ones. In 1856, for example, he added such poems as "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" and "Spontaneous Me"; in the third edition (1860) "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking" and two new sections, "Calamus" and "Children of Adam". In the fourth (1867) he incorporated the Civil War poems published a few years earlier as Drum-Taps and Sequel to Drum-Taps, including the poems on the death of Lincoln, notably "When Lilacs Last in the Door Yard Bloom'd." And so it went, a triumphant progress, hailed by Emerson, Thoreau, Rossetti and others, but also, as with the sixth edition in 1881-82, beset by charges of obscenity for such poems as "A Woman Waits for Me." Printed here is the final, the great culminating edition of 1891-92, the last supervised by Whitman himself just before his death. Whitman's prose is no less extraordinary. Specimen Days and Collect (1882) includes reminiscences of nineteenth-century New York City that will fascinate readers in the twentieth, notes on the Civil War, especially his service in Washington hospitals, and trenchant comments on books and authors. Democratic Vistas (1871), in its attacks on the misuses of national wealth after the Civil War, is relevant to conditions in our own time, and November Boughs (1888) brings together retrospective prefaces, opinions, random autobiographical bits that are in effect an extended epilogue on Whitman's life, works, and times. Here it all is, the complete Whitman-elegiac, comic, furtive, outrageous-the most innovative and original of American authors.… (mer)
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 3 omnämnanden

Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
As Ralph Waldo Emerson is the essayist of America's literature, so Whitman is its poet. Who can deny the delight of crafts like "the transparent green-shine" and "[I] am not contain'd between my hat and boots"? ( )
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
Walt Whitman was one of the first people that the United States of America could really claim as a poet. Of course, we had Edgar Allan Poe, but he wasn’t really appreciated in his own time, despite inventing so many genres. As such, this collection contains all of Whitman’s Poetry and Prose works. It includes the original version of Leaves of Grass, and it also includes the last version of Leaves of Grass that Whitman was alive to approve of.

The prose is something that I was not familiar with. I have read Leaves of Grass in one form or another before this point. I don’t remember which version it was, but it might have also had two versions included together. I would have to check. Going back to the prose; it contains an Autobiography of sorts. It talks about the life and times that Whitman lived through; probably with a sweet beard.

There really isn’t much else to say about this book. My only real complaint is that the paper used in this volume is a bit thin and delicate. Also, the book doesn’t really explain why it chose to include two versions of Leaves of Grass in an explicit manner. Perhaps it does later on in the notes, but I don’t usually bother with notes that come after the fact. I might have to look that up.

Now that I researched a bit, it does occur to me that I read about the critical response to his free verse poems. They did not follow the British Model of Poetry, they were too new. They didn’t have any real meter or rhyme scheme and weren’t a copy of Shakespeare or something. So people were bewildered and annoyed at this new thing. Also, some of the poems were very homoerotic and the public didn’t like that. At times it has been an open acceptance of his works, and at others, it has been a vitriolic attack on everything that Whitman’s poetry stands for.

Other than the thinness of the paper used in this book and the fact that it doesn’t address these issues with the poetry in a forward or some other portion of the book, this is a great resource. It doesn’t feel like a book you can really flip through, since the pages are so thin, and the book is pretty old. It doesn’t help that it is a library book and as a rule, I don’t mess with library books. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
"Leaves of grass (1855)", "Leaves of grass (1891-92)", "Complete prose works (1892)", "Supplementary prose"
  IICANA | May 19, 2016 |
Oh Walt. Finished during bus ride home. Warning - Leaves of Grass may leave you wanting to hug strangers on the bus - so many stories hurtling to the Park and Ride. ( )
1 rösta kcshankd | Jan 16, 2015 |
1. I have finished 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass. Exquisite. His main device is the catalog. He inventories America, good and bad. He loves the totality. I adored this first edition and look forward to reading final edition (1891-92) soon.

What a paean to masculinity, its physicality, the play of physique through clothing--and without clothing. The naked male is here iconographic. It's always a surprise to me how very transparent he was in his preferences so early in our history. Women by contrast, though he seeks to balance his men with them, lack physical detail that brings the lusty descriptions of men to life. ("The Female equally with the Male I sing.") Yet women are far more likely to be described by their setting, the home, or their place amid a tumult of children, than for their sheer physicality. Part of this was simply the age, when there was great outrage against prurient feminine depiction, among so-called civilized society at least. Part seems to be Whitman's disinterest. I'm reminded of Michelangelo's Medici Tombs in Florence, whose female nudes have been criticized as too male, their musculature wrong, their breasts appended almost as an afterthought.

3. Reading Specimen Days next, his big prose miscellany. This begins with an overview of both the paternal and maternal branches of his family and their lives on Long Island, New York, in the early 1800s. The description of L.I. Includes some of his boyish activities there, his friends and their exploits. It's a vivid dispatch from another world. That he writes of these matters so late in life--he visits the old family graveyards and resurrects his dead--lends special poignance. He moves on to his well-known visits to the bedsides of injured Civil War (1861-65) soldiers, mostly Union but Confederate also, among whom his brother George lay convalescing for a time. He writes letters home for the soldiers, distributes small amounts of money, listens to their tales, reads them the Bible, kisses a few, and watches them die. Most are amputees, some gravely ill with typhoid. Some laid helpless on the field of battle for days before being brought to primitive field hospitals. Oh heavens, what scene is this? – is this indeed humanity – these butcher's shambles? There are several of them. There they lie, in the largest, in an open space in the woods, from 200 to 300 poor fellows – the groans and screams – the odor of blood, mixed with the fresh scent of the night, the grass, the trees – the slaughter-house! O well is it their mothers, their sisters cannot see them – cannot conceive, and never conceived, these things.
In the section called "A Cavalry Camp," Whitman's enthusiasm--can we call it ecstasy?--at for the first time being among actual soldiers, and not only the sick, seems to me keen. Back in Washington in August of 1863, he daily sees President Lincoln on L'Enfant's broad, dusty avenues. Before long they have a nodding acquaintence with each other. Sometimes the president is in a barouche, at other times he rides a grey horse amid a detachment of uniformed cavalry, swords drawn.

Let me say this at the halfway point of Specimen Days, everything works! Every phrase is compelling. I have never read a more riveting collection of miscellaneous pieces. After the war, Whitman stayed in Washington to work in in the Office of the Attorney General in 1866 and '67 and, he says, "for some time afterward." In February 1873 he's stricken with a "paralysis" that sounds to me like stroke. It forces him to retreat to the famous little house in Camden, New Jersey. He's bed-ridden there through 1875 and '76. On recovery he is still partly disabled but is able to retreat to a country farm belonging to his friends the Staffords on "Timber Creek, twelve or thirteen miles from where it enters the Delaware." Here the book enters a nature phase. All I see before me now are descriptions of nature. It remains to be seen if I will be as beguiled by these pages as I was by his war recollections.

More to come. ( )
1 rösta William345 | Jun 11, 2014 |
Visa 1-5 av 7 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

» Lägg till fler författare

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Walt Whitmanprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Kaplan, JustinRedaktörmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
This is an omnibus unique to the Library of America; therefore, all CK facts apply to this publication only.
Förlagets redaktörer
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska (1)

This is the most comprehensive volume of Walt Whitman (1819-1892) ever published. It includes all of his poetry and what he considered his complete prose. This is also the only collection that includes, in exactly the form in which it appeared in 1855, the first edition of Leaves of Grass. This was the book, a commercial failure, that prompted Emerson's famous message to Whitman: "I greet you at the beginning of a great career". These twelve poems, including what were later to be entitled "Song of Myself" and "I Sing the Body Electric", and a preface announcing the author's poetic theories, were the first stage of a massive, lifelong work. Six editions and some thirty-seven years later Leaves of Grass had become one of the central volumes in the history of world poetry. Each edition involved revisions of earlier poems and the incorporation of new ones. In 1856, for example, he added such poems as "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" and "Spontaneous Me"; in the third edition (1860) "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking" and two new sections, "Calamus" and "Children of Adam". In the fourth (1867) he incorporated the Civil War poems published a few years earlier as Drum-Taps and Sequel to Drum-Taps, including the poems on the death of Lincoln, notably "When Lilacs Last in the Door Yard Bloom'd." And so it went, a triumphant progress, hailed by Emerson, Thoreau, Rossetti and others, but also, as with the sixth edition in 1881-82, beset by charges of obscenity for such poems as "A Woman Waits for Me." Printed here is the final, the great culminating edition of 1891-92, the last supervised by Whitman himself just before his death. Whitman's prose is no less extraordinary. Specimen Days and Collect (1882) includes reminiscences of nineteenth-century New York City that will fascinate readers in the twentieth, notes on the Civil War, especially his service in Washington hospitals, and trenchant comments on books and authors. Democratic Vistas (1871), in its attacks on the misuses of national wealth after the Civil War, is relevant to conditions in our own time, and November Boughs (1888) brings together retrospective prefaces, opinions, random autobiographical bits that are in effect an extended epilogue on Whitman's life, works, and times. Here it all is, the complete Whitman-elegiac, comic, furtive, outrageous-the most innovative and original of American authors.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (4.4)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2
2.5
3 7
3.5 2
4 31
4.5 3
5 57

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 157,856,437 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig