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Le rêve de Galilée: roman av…
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Le rêve de Galilée: roman (utgåvan 2011)

av Kim Stanley Robinson, David Camus, Dominique Haas

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
7134123,887 (3.42)51
From the summit of their distant future, a charismatic renegade named Ganymede travels to the past to bring Galileo forward in an attempt to alter history and ensure the ascendancy of science over religion. Yet between his brief and jarring visitations to this future, Galileo must struggle against the ignorance and superstition of his own time.… (mer)
Medlem:emottay
Titel:Le rêve de Galilée: roman
Författare:Kim Stanley Robinson
Andra författare:David Camus, Dominique Haas
Info:[Paris], Presses de la Cité, impr. 2011
Samlingar:Box 13
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Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Galileo's Dream av Kim Stanley Robinson

  1. 10
    Tidmaskinen av H. G. Wells (AlanPoulter)
    AlanPoulter: Each novel speculates on the far future by means of a time-travelling scientist.
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» Se även 51 omnämnanden

engelska (40)  franska (1)  Alla språk (41)
Visa 1-5 av 41 (nästa | visa alla)
My knowledge about Galileo is very limited, and it has been too long since I last learned or read anything about the man or his works. But as I like Kim Stanley Robinson's works, and like my books to have an added value, I decided to buy and read this brick of 578 pages. A mix of Sci-Fi and Historical Fiction screams to be read, doesn't it?

The story indeed involves Galileo's lifetime and (in the story) his time spent in the future, a few thousands of years after the era he lived in. KSR nicely describes/demonstrates the differences between the two, creates a very interesting setting, although one of the present time, and perhaps Galileo's time, would prefer some tangible elements of nature and life. The link with nature, and less with technology.

KSR's writing style is accessible to some extent, or rather, it's hard to put the book down. And yes, the writing style does contribute to that, although the used vocabulary isn't always that easy to understand. Either it's technical (it's SCIENCE Fiction, after all), or it's untranslated Italian - and if like me you're not that proficient in Italian, then you'll need a dictionary at hand.

About Galileo: did he really have such a bad health? Was he choleric when things didn't go his way? Was he a womaniser? All very much surprising to me. But again, the last time I learned/read about the man was ages ago, by manner of speech. Also, the influence of the Church remains a problematic issue. Galileo not having the freedom to write/teach/... what he had discovered, because it went against the Holy Scripture. What? So, because it's written in some holy text, and someone can refute it, he's punished for delivering evidence that Scripture "needs tweaking"?

Still, even today religion and science don't get along that well. Not that science is always right. It isn't. But as you've got thick-headed people in religion, you've got such people in science as well. So, perhaps it's not always the "field" (i.e. religion, science, ...), but more the people involved in it that give it a bad name or bad image. Anyway, the two are compatible, but if and when people (active in those fields) will see that, is another matter.

Also a plus with regards to the book, is the beginning of each chapter with philosophical quotes from Italian philosophers/astronomers/... another proof of added value, that KSR did his research to make the story more lively. Even if through his writing alone he managed to make you feel for Galileo, support him in his struggle to get his ideas out to the world, without the interference of the Church, even if Galileo was a convinced Catholic, yet didn't allow how the Church was run. That's what I derive from the book. And it's not only about Galileo; Kepler, Archimedes, Copernicus, ... also are mentioned now and then.

The book ends with a chapter that sort of compares Galileo's era and the current era, or that nothing much has changed since Galileo's death. There are still wars, science hasn't always made the right choices (for a better world), etc... but one can only hope for improvement, on all levels. And that everyone can contribute to that.

In short: anyone interested in Galileo Galilei, his life, his works, etc... with a futuristic twist, but doesn't feel like reading dry or academic books (which you can always read later, if your interest has been sparked), should definitely read "Galileo's Dream". Not thàt accessible, but it does put your mind to work. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
I was very excited when this book came out. Those feelings did not last long. The sections that deal with Galileo in his native Italy are very well done. I would rate those 4 stars. My problem is with the future sequences. I don't get a good feel for the times or the culture. The characters seems flat. Could have been a really good book. ( )
  Steve_Walker | Sep 13, 2020 |
"The principle is very simple," Galileo began, always a bad sign. ( )
  Jon_Hansen | Aug 13, 2020 |
This is Kim Stanley Robinson’s love letter to science and mathematics. I loved it!

In many ways, this is perhaps the least typical novel Kim Stanley Robinson has written. It’s certainly the most passionate and overtly philosophical work he’s written.

What struck me first about the book is how reminiscent it is of the unexpected traveler stories so popular in the SF pulp era of the ‘20s and ‘30s. It was refreshing. At the same time, the scientific theory that defines the world in this novel is about as cutting edge as it gets. Of course, much of the book is set in Galileo’s Italy of the first half of the 17th century and explores both the state of science at that time and the conflicts with religion that defined it.

One might expect that all these different styles would make the book a giant mess... but it doesn’t.

This isn’t Mr. Robinson’s best work by any means, but in many ways it’s his most personal. In many ways, I think it’s his most powerful. His writing here has immediacy and an intimacy that I never saw in his more famous novels.

If I have one complaint, it’s that the ending feels like it drags out for too long. More than once in the last few chapters, I found myself wishing he’d just wrap it up already. But by the time I got to the true end of the novel, I was glad that Mr. Robinson had taken me there. So I guess that makes it worth it.

What I like best about this novel are two sections beginning about a third of the way into the book where he takes us through a concise history of the development of mathematics and physics, from Archimedes to current 10-dimensional string theory. He explains it all about as well as I've ever seen these issues explained in lay terms. In particular, I appreciate that he freely acknowledges how much of our understanding of the universe is counter-intuitive and apparently contradictory, how little of it makes sense to most people.

I first became interested in cosmology – the Big Bang, quantum mechanics, relativity, etc. – when I was in third grade. I’ve spent my life pondering these ideas, trying to wrap my brain around concepts that are irreducibly counter-intuitive and simply can’t be imagined. As Mr. Robinson quotes Niels Bohr in this novel: “If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet.” This is true of all cosmology. I’ve had a lifetime of learning to be comfortable with the shock of these extraordinary ideas.

I know many people, however, who haven’t been acclimated to these sorts of ideas before, who haven’t learned how to think in such deeply counter-intuitive ways. Trying to explain cutting edge physics to someone new to it is therefore very difficult.

For the foreseeable future, I’m going to use these passages from Galileo’s Dream to do it. It’s simply the best introduction to cosmological theory I’ve read. ( )
1 rösta johnthelibrarian | Aug 11, 2020 |
I wonder if this project started off as an attempt at a straight fictional biography, like [b:Doctor Mirabilis|123671|Doctor Mirabilis|James Blish|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1290068768s/123671.jpg|962904] which is also about a scientist who falls foul of the Catholic Church? Hard to say, but it stands as a science fiction story in which Galileo is contacted by humans from the distant future who want him to help with a problem they are having on Europa...

So there are two stories, one about Galileo's life from the start of his work on telescopes up to his death and another about dreams of Europa where strange and complicated things are happening and something has been discovered in the ocean...Eventually these two threads intertwine and start to affect each other in dramatic ways.

This book really ought to be a failure. Chunks of it are theme and variation on Galileo is debauched, ill, irritable and always short of money - it should get boring but it never quite does. Maybe because the parts where Galileo is doing science or where he is dreaming the future leaven it sufficiently. Maybe because the drama played out over the Copernican world-view is compelling. Maybe because the drama played out near Jupiter is compelling and towards the end an imaginative and descriptive triumph that brought tears to my eyes.

People who have read a fair amount of KSR will know that he has a strong theme of environmental concern running through most of his books. It's back again here but it is mixed with questions about the effect of science and religion on society, whether human nature will evolve, the consequences of war, the compulsive nature of the scientific mind, the beauty of nature and what constitutes life.

A pleasure to read, building steadily to a dramatic climax in Rome and on the moons of Jupiter. ( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
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» Lägg till fler författare (3 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Kim Stanley Robinsonprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Camus, DavidTraductionmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Guidall, GeorgeBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Haas, DominiqueTraductionmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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All of a sudden Galileo felt that this moment had happened before - that he had been standing in the artisans' Friday market outside Venice's Arsenale and felt someone's gaze on him, and looked up to see a man staring at him, a tall stranger with a beaky narrow face.
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From the summit of their distant future, a charismatic renegade named Ganymede travels to the past to bring Galileo forward in an attempt to alter history and ensure the ascendancy of science over religion. Yet between his brief and jarring visitations to this future, Galileo must struggle against the ignorance and superstition of his own time.

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