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Intill fjärde led (1943)

av Daphne du Maurier

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MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
583830,570 (3.66)51
A storyteller of cunning and genius - Sally Beauman Hungry Hill' is a passionate story told with du Maurier's unique gift for drama. It follows five generations of an Irish family and the copper mine on Hungry Hill to which their fortunes and fates are bound. 'I tell you your mine will be in ruins and your home destroyed and your children forgotten . . . but this hill will be standing still to confound you.' So curses Morty Donovan when 'Copper John' Brodrick builds his mine at Hungry Hill. The Brodricks of Clonmere gain great wealth by harnessing the power of Hungry Hill and extracting the treasure it holds. The Donovans, the original owners of Clonmere Castle, resent the Brodricks' success, and consider the great house and its surrounding land theirs by rights. For generations the feud between the families has simmered, always threatening to break into violence . . .… (mer)
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Hungry Hill is the Brodrick family's saga, beginning with John Brodrick—also known as John Copper—who lived in the castle of Clonmere outside the town of Doonhaven. In 1820 John, a widower with five children decides to start mining copper on Hungry Hill, creating ill will with the villagers and rekindling an old feud with the Donovan family. The mine brings untold riches to the Brodrick family for generations, but old Morty Donovan promptly curses them. The characters appear to be cloned as either gentle, kind, ambitious, or slovenly, irresponsible, and just plain no good. I found the story tragic and a little depressing. ( )
  PaulaGalvan | Feb 2, 2021 |
A wee bit drawn out for my taste. This is the 4th random book choice in 2 month's time that just so happen to dwell on the wealthy gentried class, and we get to witness their steady decline.....most often due to basically, poor parenting! My assumption was this took place in Ireland...or Northern Ireland most likely...... We witness the Brodrick family in their castle Clonmere near Doonhaven....and we witness the beginning of the Copper Mines on Hungry Hill, mines that will dramatically increase this family's fortune.....or does it? Endless 'tragedies' ensue......mostly due to very poor decisions made for all the wrong reasons.....leading to the feeling of a curse. Somewhat predictable, certainly a bit sappy with the love interests, etc......and far too often populated with people i just did not like .....and witnessing their abhorrent behavior became a bit tedious. Of course there were always good guys to root for....but again....it went on and on...... Certainly not DuMaurier's best, but as always, i learned....about mining in the1800's......the political strife in the region leading to rebellion, etc. etc. Proceed with caution. ( )
  jeffome | Dec 19, 2020 |
So this to me is not a typical Daphne du Maurier novel. There are hints of some Gothic elements here and there with a curse being flung about. But other than that, du Maurier just follows along following five generations of the Brodrick family from 1820 to 1920 following five of the male characters from the Brodrick family. I have to say that from beginning to end the tale of "Hungry Hill" is going to grab you. And you start to wonder if a curse is really what is affecting certain members of the family or is it simply fate? I loved the writing, the character development, the setting, and ultimately the ending. It seems that in the end, the last male surviving member of that family has changed his family's fate.

"Hungry Hill" starts off following a man that is named Cooper John (due to the cooper mine he opens up on Hungry Hill). Cooper John is a widower with two sons (Henry and John) and three daughters. Cooper John is focused on enlarging his family's castle called Clonmere and having enough money left to take care of his children's children. I don't think that Cooper John was a bad man, but he is very black and white on things and he loves his children though he is often left confused and frustrated with his second eldest son, also named John. From there, du Maurier follows the rest of the family line and the book is broken up into parts. From Cooper John we follow Greyhound John, Wild Johnnie, Henry, Hal, and finally we go into the last book called The Inheritance.

I have to say that all of the sections were fascinating. I don't think you will come away liking most of the people in this book, but you will love reading about them. I think my favorite book though had to be the one with Henry. My least favorite (as much as one was my least favorite) was the one with Hal. I don't want to get into talking too much and spoiling things, but you have to wonder at times if only so and so happened this may have meant a different fate for the characters that follow. Except for the character of Greyhound John, I don't think that any in the Brodrick family loved the land truly. And even then with him, he lost interest in it as soon as he finally gets the woman he has desired.

The Donovan family is another big piece of this book and we find out at the beginning of the book, Cooper John's grandfather was shot in the back by a Donovan. And the Donovan's of the present seem focused on ruining Cooper John and his family's fortune. There seems to be parts superstition and just plain rage towards the Brodrick's and I wonder if du Maurier contemplated showing their side of the story at all.

The writing was so good. I honestly felt sad when I got to the end. I would have loved to read on about this family past the 1920s. The flow was great too. From book to book it makes sense who we follow and why and I always loved books where I can follow characters through decades.

The setting of this book is Ireland in the late 1800s and the first World War. I have to say that it read as different to me than what I expected. I don't know what I thought about Ireland back then, but I honestly didn't know anything about cooper mines existing there.

The ending of the book though gives a glimmer that a new change is finally coming to the Brodrick clan and with that the end of the supposed curse. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Set in Ireland and covering the time span of a century, from 1820 to 1920, the story follows five generations of the Anglo-Protestant Brodrick family from the moment John Brodrick of Clonmere prepares to establish a copper mine on Hungry Hill. But because he neglects to ask permission of the hill first, the family is cursed by the descendant of the previous land-owning family, the Donovans, evicted to make room for the Brodricks. As we follow the fate of each successive generation, it becomes clear that the mine has given the Brodricks their fortune, but not their happiness.

I agree with another reviewer that the extent of the novel (just over 400 pages) doesn’t allow for each of the five generations to be followed in depth; instead, the narrative zooms in and out of an individual’s story at will, often missing out several months or years at a time, and a member of the family, whose fate the reader has followed for a long time in the novel’s time frame, is then suddenly and unceremoniously dispatched in the course of a sentence. Additionally, the plot, with the exception of the last featured member of the Brodricks, appears to be set in a historical and political bubble so that the characters concerned are seemingly unaffected by events unfolding in Ireland and Great Britain at the time and aren’t interacting with each other in a historical context (e.g. colonial wars and the Crimean War only get a fleeting mention, and the Irish potato famine in the 1840s and early ’50s, which would have had an enormous impact on the rural population, doesn’t warrant a mention at all). Where the progression of decades does make itself felt is in the subtle progress being made in terms of miners’ rights and their use of machinery and mining processes, though the latter are seen as a natural investment in order to march with the times, and the former are only grudgingly granted by the Brodricks, keen to obtain the greatest margin of profit. And though the plight of the miners is acknowledged, I couldn’t help shake the suspicion that du Maurier’s political and class affiliations were lodged firmly with the gentry on the whole, as throughout the novel the reader repeatedly encounters the stereotypical images of the lazy and work-shy Irishman with a fondness for drink and racing who can’t be trusted, whereas the English generally are well educated, disciplined and/or hard workers.

The novel is written firmly from the male point of view, and yet it is the women who prove the stronger characters and the men, the weaker (John Brodrick, ‘Copper John’, excepted). There were a number of occasions when I wanted to yell at the (male) member of the Brodricks to get his act together and do something, rather than just sit in an armchair and mope, full of self-pity. And yet at the turn of the last page I felt strangely ambivalent: glad for the book to be finally over but also feeling that several characters linger on in the mind. ( )
  passion4reading | Aug 2, 2017 |
I close this book with sadness. (Spoiler? Not sure how far to take that definition.) It is a dense book covering the lives of several generations of men and women--though pretty much all told from the male POV--of a landlord family that was imposed on the Irish countryside in the 1700s and has been imposing itself on the people in small ways and large ever since. The period covered is 1820-1920, from the building of a copper mine to its end. Du Maurier doesn't get into the heads of the Irish people, despite letting the injustices be known, and at times we wonder "whose side" she's on. The protagonists are not always sympathetic characters, but neither are they utterly without our sympathy. They are sometimes aware of the injustice of their relationship to the land and people, but never enough to do anything about it. I found myself crying out for one life to be wholly well lived; there is sorrow in every generation, but there is triumph as well, on a small, personal scale, and there is love, even when misunderstanding is there as well. The resentment of the family that was displaced by the newcomers twists them into unpleasant characters; but are not our arrogant landowners unpleasant, too? A complex, subtle novel, weighty and sorrowful, and yet not without ever-unfurling hope. ( )
1 rösta thesmellofbooks | Mar 28, 2016 |
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Maurier, Daphne duprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Auerbach, NinaInledningmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat

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Book One, Chapter 1 (Copper John, 1820 - 1828): On the third of March, 1820, John Brodrick set out from Andriff to Doonhaven, intending to cover the fifteen miles of his journey before nightfall.
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Like her, he chatted of trivialities, being amusing for the sake of being amusing, exaggerating often, skimming over the surface of things because it was easier than finding the depths. (p. 296)
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A storyteller of cunning and genius - Sally Beauman Hungry Hill' is a passionate story told with du Maurier's unique gift for drama. It follows five generations of an Irish family and the copper mine on Hungry Hill to which their fortunes and fates are bound. 'I tell you your mine will be in ruins and your home destroyed and your children forgotten . . . but this hill will be standing still to confound you.' So curses Morty Donovan when 'Copper John' Brodrick builds his mine at Hungry Hill. The Brodricks of Clonmere gain great wealth by harnessing the power of Hungry Hill and extracting the treasure it holds. The Donovans, the original owners of Clonmere Castle, resent the Brodricks' success, and consider the great house and its surrounding land theirs by rights. For generations the feud between the families has simmered, always threatening to break into violence . . .

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