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L'Homme à la découverte de son âme av…
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L'Homme à la découverte de son âme (urspr publ 1933; utgåvan 1963)

av Carl Gustav Jung (Auteur), Roland Cahen (Auteur)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,40689,820 (3.89)9
Modern Man in Search of a Soul is the perfect introduction to the theories and concepts of one of the most original and influential religious thinkers of the twentieth century. Lively and insightful, it covers all of his most significant themes, including man's need for a God and the mechanics of dream analysis. One of his most famous books, it perfectly captures the feelings of confusion that many sense today. Generation X might be a recent concept, but Jung spotted its forerunner over half a century ago. For anyone seeking meaning in today's world, Modern Man in Search of a Soul is a must.… (mer)
Medlem:le-chasseur-de-Snark
Titel:L'Homme à la découverte de son âme
Författare:Carl Gustav Jung (Auteur)
Andra författare:Roland Cahen (Auteur)
Info:Payot Saint-Amand, impr. Bussière (1963), 350 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:*****
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Själen och dess problem i den moderna människans liv av C. G. Jung (1933)

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» Se även 9 omnämnanden

engelska (6)  franska (2)  Alla språk (8)
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> Dans l’Antiquité comme chez les primitifs,
l’homme pouvait être facilement plongé dans
l’inconscient collectif, par un simple récit dont les
images s’emparaient alors de tout son être avec
une puissance telle que son système vasculaire et
ses régulations neuro-humorales rétablissaient
l’équilibre compromis. C’est d’ailleurs ce qui
explique la valeur curative de la médecine magi-
que à l’échelon primitif, alors que nous ne
concevons la possibilité d’efficacité de cette sorte
que tout au plus dans le domaine moral.
--C. G. JUNG*
*In: C.-G. Jung, L’Homme à la découverte de son âme (1950) ; cité dans: Jeanne Guesné, Le 3e souffle, Albin Michel (1995), p. 139

> Persée : https://www.persee.fr/doc/ahess_0395-2649_1967_num_22_3_421561_t1_0655_0000_2

> Gallica : https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k17282k/f507.item

> L'HOMME Â LA DÉCOUVERTE DE SON ÂME. (Collection Action et Pensée) by C. G. Jung, R. Cahen-Salabelle
In: Revue Philosophique de la France et de l'Étranger, T. 138 (1948), p. 503. … ; (en ligne),
URL : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XUdVgoV-KgyByKOz7BfHMAYp5bd_bmG5/view?usp=shari... ; JSTOR : https://www.jstor.org/stable/41085135

> « L'HOMME Â LA DÉCOUVERTE DE SON ÂME », de C.G. JUNG (Éd. Albin Michel). — Le classique sur l’art de laisser parler l’inconscient et de lui prêter une oreille attentive. A lire, entre autres, du même auteur : Synchronicité et Paracelsica, chez le même éditeur. --Clés, Juil.-Août 1990
  Joop-le-philosophe | Oct 6, 2019 |
Ouvrage d'un chercheur sincère qui ne nous achemine pas vers notre âme mais vers certaines zones cachées de notre mental. Bonnes études sur le rêve.
  yogasantosha | Jun 7, 2018 |
Modern Man in Search of a Soul collects ten lectures on psychotherapy, cultural mentalities, and religion, given by Jung in the late inter-war period. They were translated into English by Baynes in 1933 and supplemented with an essay by Jung on the distinctions between his psychology and that of Freud. My copy is a Harvest/HBJ mass-market paperback that I can easily imagine littering college campuses in the 1960s.

Jung says,"To the psyche, the spirit is no less the spirit even though it be called sexuality" (73), and in this point he seems to be opposing the Freudian focus on "sexuality" to Jung's own preference for construing issues in terms of "spirit." The key subtext here, however, is the critical identity and continuity between spiritual and sexual phenomena. Since Jung avoids mentioning sex at least as often as Freud insists upon it, this continuity is useful to keep in mind when reading either thinker.

Although I have been accustomed to seeing Jung as the primary representative of the "right wing" of the psychoanalytic tradition (contrasted with Reich and Marcuse on the left), there are passages here which prompt me to suspend that judgment. For example he declares, "My aim is to bring about a psychic state in which my patient begins to experiment with his own nature--a state of fluidity, change and growth, in which there is no longer anything eternally fixed and hopelessly petrified" (66). Thus Jung identifies his therapeutic goal with the loosening of character, and the subjection of identity to a changeable individual will.

In the lecture "The Stages of Life," Jung presents a theory of climacteric personal development. Very significantly he uses a solar metaphor identifying birth with dawn and death with sunset. He also remarks--with particular reference to his patients--that 20th-century Western culture suffers a poverty of institutions capable of psychically orienting individuals to the "afternoon" of life, and claims that "Our religions were always such schools in the past" (109). In this last point, I think he errs. Religions have always had a much wider range of functions, and it is in particular the orders of initiation (most often embedded in religious contexts) that supplied the desideratum.

The individual passage of the book that made the most striking impression on me was in "The Basic Postulates of Analytical Psychology," where I take Jung to be painting an eloquent picture of what Eliphas Levi called The Baphomet of Mendes, a pantheistic and magical figure of the absolute: "If it were permissible to personify the unconscious, we might call it a collective human being combining the characteristics of both sexes, transcending youth and age, birth and death, and, from having at his command a human experience of one or two million years, almost immortal. If such a being existed, he would be exalted above all temporal change ... he would be a dreamer of age-old dreams and, owing to his immeasurable experience, he would be an incomparable prognosticator. He would have lived countless times over the life of the individual, of the family, tribe and people, and he would possess the living sense of the rhythm of growth, flowering, and decay" (186).

Lectures of less esoteric interest include "Aims of Psychotherapy," which elaborates a context in which to situate Freudian, Adlerian, and Jungian approaches to the discipline, as well as "A Psychological Theory of Types," which expands Jung's introversion/extraversion polarity with the two additional dimensions of thinking/feeling and sensation/intuition, but without the perception/judging axis that would complete them in the now-ubiquitous MBTI. The lecture "Psychology and Literature" focuses on visionary literature, and is thus actually more concerned with spiritual states and phenomena than literary production as such. It even touches on one of my particular favorite works in this vein, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (157, 166).

The book's final two chapters stand out for Jung's discussion of religion as a barometer of collective spiritual states. In "The Spiritual Problem of Modern Man" he discusses the "deep affinity with Gnosticism" expressed by contemporary spirituality, and he also treats at length the extent to which the "repellent" strains of occultism, Theosophy, and imported Oriental mysticisms both demonstrate the obsolescence of established religious forms and may serve as the seedbeds for their successors. "Psychotherapists or the Clergy?" treats the conundrum of secular psychotherapists being preferred to clergy by clients whose actual demand is for what traditionally would have been considered spiritual direction.
4 rösta paradoxosalpha | Nov 26, 2017 |
Haven't quite finished it yet, but I'm giving it a solid four. It's Jung. It's all about the dreams. That's all I want to say. ( )
  S.D. | Apr 4, 2014 |
It's been almost eighty years since Carl Jung wrote "Modern Man in Search of a Soul," so it's not really surprising that some of the book's value is purely historical. Jung spends a lot of time carefully differentiating psychology from medical and arguing for its rigorousness and relevance. Even though a lot of this material will seem familiar to Western readers who've grown up in "psychologized" societies, it's still genuinely heartwarming to witness Jung's enthusiasm for psychic exploration. I get the impression that he saw the unconscious as a genuinely undiscovered territory brimming with wonders yet to be described. He was one of the founders of the science he described, but in "Modern Man," he makes it clear that he couldn't even venture a guess at all that the psyche contains. His sense of wonder is contagious; if nothing else, these essays remind the reader of the vast depth of the self and of the sheer variety of human experience.

The sections that I found most of "Modern Man in Search of a Soul" that I found most interesting were contained in the essays "Archaic Man" and "The Spiritual Problem of Modern Man." Part of this book's project seems to be to nudge Western, scientific models of the self from their preeminent position at the very center of modernity, and Jung writes sensitively of the time that he spent with indigenous tribes in sub-Saharan Africa and the American West. These experiences led Jung to conclude that the psyche exists, in a sense, both inside and outside ourselves. In his view, modern man's dependence on natural science to describe the physical world necessitated the development of an unconscious. In earlier eras, religion or an active relationship with the spirit world did the work that we now attribute to our unconscious self. Hysterias and many other common mental disorders, then, might be understood as externalized psychological objects. I found Jung's inversion of the usual psychological schematic – his contention that a person's unconscious is just one psychological object in a world filled with them – to be absolutely thrilling, an enormous idea and one that might change the way I look at myself and others. These essays, which are, as the jacket copy promises, accessible to the lay reader, bear repeated readings. If Jung believed in anything, he believed in the vastness and complexity of the self. With this in mind, it might just take a few decades for me to figure out how some of his ideas apply to my own day-to-day experience. ( )
1 rösta TheAmpersand | Dec 24, 2011 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
C. G. Jungprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Baynes, Cary F.Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Dell, W. S.Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Nitsche, EricOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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The use of dream-analysis in psychotherapy is still a much-debated question.
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Modern Man in Search of a Soul is the perfect introduction to the theories and concepts of one of the most original and influential religious thinkers of the twentieth century. Lively and insightful, it covers all of his most significant themes, including man's need for a God and the mechanics of dream analysis. One of his most famous books, it perfectly captures the feelings of confusion that many sense today. Generation X might be a recent concept, but Jung spotted its forerunner over half a century ago. For anyone seeking meaning in today's world, Modern Man in Search of a Soul is a must.

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