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Den tibetanska livs- och dödsboken (1992)

av Sogyal Rinpoche

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MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,973225,885 (4.22)9
"A magnificent achievement. In its power to touch the heart, to awaken consciousness, [The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying] is an inestimable gift." --San Francisco Chronicle A newly revised and updated 25th Anniversary edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, "The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante's] The Divine Comedy," this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World's Religions, to proclaim, "I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise."… (mer)
Senast inlagd avprivat bibliotek, LoriFox, lowelibrary, pamkahl55, Merlyn_MacLeod, kulana, barrettam, Erik39
Efterlämnade bibliotekIris Murdoch
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» Se även 9 omnämnanden

engelska (15)  tyska (2)  spanska (1)  finska (1)  franska (1)  Alla språk (20)
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A discussion of the age-old techniques on which the classic "Tibetan Book of the Dead" is based examines the possibility for healing that can be released when people begin to view death as another chapter of life.
  CamPeaceGal | Sep 23, 2020 |
I’m a Christian; I read this book as an interfaith exercise. It is of course quite different from my own background. Tibetan names and words don’t stick with me; (it’s not like Spanish); and part of the lesson was getting a sense of the cultural gulf—how much reading, and, more, how much interpersonal communication would be necessary to begin to understand, truly, and just how important cultural and personal specificities can be. Actually, I first read this book when I was a new age person several years ago, bent on being my own authority—which is not what Rinpoche says to do—and now that I’m a Christian, and I read it again, I feel like I got a lot more out of it. I liked best, although I understood least, the parts which had the most traditional Tibetan feel. I’m not very social, or even devotional, but one of the things I took away was the necessity for devotions and interpersonal teachings.

Tibetan words and names don’t stick with me, and it took me awhile to remember the one that I wanted—tonglen. Notice how Christlike the teaching is:

“‘I know how much pain you’re in. Imagine now all the others in the world who are in a pain like yours, or even greater. Fill your heart with compassion for them. And pray to whomever you believe in and ask that your suffering should help alleviate theirs. **Again and again dedicate your pain to the alleviation of their pain.** And you will quickly discover in yourself a new source of strength, a compassion you’ll hardly be able to imagine, and a certainty beyond any shadow of a doubt, that your suffering is not only not being wasted, but has now a marvelous meaning.’” **emphasis added**

So now if it happens that I suffer, I will dedicate my suffering to Christ.... Or, as we would say in the Christian pop movement, Dedicated to you.

Of course, there are philosophical (not merely linguistic) differences too, such as the idea, “I will know (the body) to be a transitory illusion”, which is different from the Christian notion of incarnation. Just because something sounds characteristically spiritual does not mean that it is shared equally be all religions. I just don’t want to give you the impression that, you know, ChiComm oppression is just too good for the paynims. Anger is a fruit of the Spirit!.... With some people it’s not about what’s moral, but about what’s most easily distinguishable from the ‘Samaritans’. But that is not the ethic of Jesus. Plenty of culturally specific ideas, to be sure, and no indication that he’d ever been to India, but also no indication that what he *really* aspired to be was a ChiComm/Roman Imperial legislator.

Anyway, it’s a very interesting and multi-faceted book, and there is much interplay between its constituent sections. In one section, he gets asked by an apparently agnostic doctor (here, probably unaware of and/or terrified by religion) what to do about the dying patient who asks, you know, Will God forgive my many sins—I’m afraid of the guy! Here the author responds, in effect, Yeah yeah, sure sure, God forgives everything no matter what, just ask and you’ll receive because there’s no such thing as judgment—sounding very much like your typical Liberal Protestant who’s afraid of and/or embarrassed by God. But in the more Tibet-centric parts of the book there are many assertions that failing to purify your negative karma through spiritual practice results in wasted opportunities and painful rebirths, and whatever this Tibet-centric thing is, this “Buddhism” of which Anglophones know so much, it doesn’t sound much like the semi-religious psych-centric semi-Liberal Protestant ashamed-of-God thing that he presents in part of the book, smilingly sympathizes with, and of course can never openly denounce.

Reading the book also made me very curious about vegetarianism, especially since I haven’t really bought any meat in awhile because of the pandemic.
  goosecap | May 28, 2020 |
Very good piece on death, the process of dying and the art of dying. Derived from ancient Tibetan knowledge and wisdom. One important point is that if you are prepared for death and know what to expect, it gives you peace of mind, reduces fear, and makes it easier to live your current life fully. I’ve bought several copies of this book and distributed it amongst the people close to me, with my wish that I want do die as instructed in this book, and that I want to have this book read to me on my death bed. In case you are confronted with death in your close circle, consider reading some passages of this book to the one who is dying, to ease their fear and to prepare them for what is coming. ( )
  remouherek | Feb 24, 2020 |
The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche is a classic of Eastern Philosophy. It discusses the methods and techniques to prepare your mindset for the impending specter of death that eventually visits us all. The book is not all about death and dying, it attempts to instruct the reader on how to live without regret. It is beautifully written and quite inspiring. The version I have is the Twentieth Anniversary edition and other than the preface message, I don’t think anything else was updated.

The book discusses phenomena associated with dying people, some of whom have attained enlightenment. Since I don’t really believe in God or Life after Death, trying to wrap my head around stories of Reincarnation gave me feelings of cognitive dissonance. I mean, I can accept some things, but past lives and Life after Death is not something you can really explain without a hand wave. So some parts of this book were really hard to swallow, but I can accept the advice it provides to take care of dying people. In the end, people are all pretty much the same. When you are dying, the facade that you put forth for others comes off and you become who you truly are.

On another note, the book is also quite informative about Tibetan Culture and how they choose successors and other things. For instance, take the name of the author. Since I am a Westerner and an American, I generally assume that the person’s given name comes first and the family name comes last. Now I know that some other cultures have the opposite way of doing that, notably Japan and maybe Korea. For this gentleman, it isn’t even that. He inherited the name ‘Rinpoche’ as a title which means ‘Precious One.’

So this book was really fascinating and I liked it quite a bit. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Who dies? The answer to this question goes straight to the heart of Dzogchen, a 1,200-year-old school of Tibetan Buddhism that sees impermanence as the very essence of existence.

Sogyal Rinpoche grew up in the last generation of Tibetans who learned Buddhism as it was traditionally taught in Tibet. Schooled by his country's most revered masters, and later educated at Cambridge, Sogyal Rinpoche is uniquely prepared to bring this ancient tradition to the Western world today.

On Tibetan Wisdom for Living and Dying, Rinpoche presents a grand and transforming vision of life and death, introducing you to Tibetan practices that can help anyone live fully, while preparing for the extraordinary adventure that death offers each one of us.

What we call life and death, Rinpoche teaches, are merely shades of the same unbroken wholeness. By daring to see clearly the truth of our lives, and by exploring the part of us that is changeless and eternal, we can face the last moment of life without fear.

Masterfully taught, Tibetan Wisdom for Living and Dying is both a guide to this inner technology and a sacred document for listeners of all faiths and traditions.
  PSZC | Mar 26, 2019 |
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"A magnificent achievement. In its power to touch the heart, to awaken consciousness, [The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying] is an inestimable gift." --San Francisco Chronicle A newly revised and updated 25th Anniversary edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, "The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante's] The Divine Comedy," this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World's Religions, to proclaim, "I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise."

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