HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Laddar...

Tintin i Tibet (1960)

av Hergé

Andra författare: Se under Andra författare.

Serier: Tintins äventyr {Hergé} (20)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1,881146,805 (4.13)40
Lagom till Tintins 75-årsjubileum förra året började förlaget ge ut samtliga delar i kronologisk ordning, i ny svensk översättning av en Tintinexpert. I år fortsätter böckerna komma ut. "Tintin i Tibet" räknas av många som Hergés mest personliga album. Tintin, Milou och kapten Haddock betvingar Tibets iskalla bergstoppar för att leta efter Tintins goda vän Tchang Tchong-Jen, som tros ha dött i en flygplanskrasch. I bergen lurar också andra faror. [Barnbokskatalogen]… (mer)
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 40 omnämnanden

engelska (9)  danska (2)  franska (1)  nederländska (1)  spanska (1)  Alla språk (14)
Visa 1-5 av 14 (nästa | visa alla)
My review, as published at Tintin Books:

Mention Tintin to any fan over 20, and chances are they'll recall [b:Red Rackham's Treasure|146109|Red Rackham's Treasure (The Adventures of Tintin)|Hergé|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172178127s/146109.jpg|729618], and then "Tintin in Tibet". The first - filled with adventure, science, excitement and a tale of pirates - is obvious; the second, not so much.

As everyone knows, one of the forces that led to this album's creation was Herge's own personal problems, and haunting dreams of an expanse of never-ending white. Determined to take the series in a new direction, Herge ended up with this work - surely his most emotional and mature. From the very start, Tintin's face is more expressive than we've ever seen him before - whether in joy, fear or anger. And Haddock is allowed to be more mature and stoic at times, befitting the sober side of his character, which works very well.

As is constantly touted, this work features no villain nor many recurring characters. It is instead, an emotional - almost spiritual - journey for Tintin. Every single person he meets, from kind sherpa to humble monk, attempts to convince him that his quest is worthless, that his good friend Chang must surely be dead from the plane crash in the Himalayas. Yet he presses on, forcing himself through the endless mountain expanses of Tibet. As things get more isolated, Herge's drawing gets more lush, and he does seem to have revelled in the minimalist opportunities afforded him on this occasion. The early frames - capturing true-to-life shots of Nepal, for instance - are equally well done, but the cap must surely be Haddock's surreal dream sequence of playing chess with a nappy-wearing Calculus!

One of the tropes that defines Herge's later work is his willingness to be realistic about the consequences of the adventures. The teddy bear found at the plane crash site is not Chang's, but it doesn't matter: even if Chang survived, no one else did. As the Abbot says, the mountains keep those they take. As a result, Chang's safety seems more uncertain here than Tintin's safety in the previous 19 works combined.

Snowy also gets a fair amount to do, which is atypical of the later albums. His fantasy sequences, in which Snowy is taunted by angel and devil versions of himself, are again a stylistic experiment but manage to be a success due to Herge's more mannered use of Tintin's loyal dog. Snowy's actions - be they risking his life, or attempting to save his friends - are as intimately connected to the story as everything else here. This hasn't always been the case, as in many stories he functions as light comic relief, so it is nice to see the dog being used as a plot point but without losing his sprightly characterisation.

Other successes include the well-balanced portrayals of the Tibetan monks - humorous and yet earnest in turn; the hilarious shots of Haddock gradually falling behind the explorer's party; - and the frames with Tintin and Chang together at the end. It's popular these days to associate the two as a 'couple' even though we're aware that this was far from Herge's intention. But whether platonic or otherwise, their friendship resonates off the page, again belying Herge's own feelings of lost friendship toward the original 'Chang'.

Less successful elements:

* Haddock losing faith and then turning back at the last second, happens maybe twice too often. It's very satisfying to see Tintin being the 'irrational' person, for once, but it seems as if - in such a differently-structured adventure - Herge was out of ideas for how to introduce dramatic tension.

* Again, Herge's biggest downfall may be one of his biggest strengths: his desire to impart knowledge. Whilst waiting for their transport, Haddock and Tintin go sight-seeing. But when it's time to catch the plane, Tintin seems reluctant to leave the architecture behind. Which is a bit frustrating, since earlier he was determined to find his missing-possibly-dead friend as soon as possible!

One final thought: Herge seems to be reluctant to ascribe an age to Tintin. He starts out on holiday with the Captain, still as the earnest reporter. By album's end, he is constantly being referred to as a young boy and the scenes in the cave - see page 57 - show him at the most boyish he has ever looked!

All in all, "Tintin in Tibet" is surely a four-and-a-half star work. In keeping with his humanist philosophy, Herge rightly draws the Yeti as a figure of pathos : a lonely being unable to truly help his ward. The artist experiments further with his surrealist dream sequences, and manages finally to produce emotion from a character who has been an audience cipher for nineteen albums now. On top of this, distanced from the wide cast of characters who have populated the last half-dozen albums, Herge creates something decidedly different. I'll concede it is not my favourite - possibly it is number 5 or 6 in my estimation. After all, the first quarter is the inevitable build-up, and in terms of plot, Herge is reduced to recycling through two or three different beats. (To his credit, they seem realistic every time). But as an emotional exercise, and as a work of art, this is surely a contender for Tintin's most human adventure. (And any story that can end with Haddock being given the nickname "Rumbling Thunderblessings" must be given some credit!) ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 5, 2021 |
I think my favorite characters here are Snowy and the Yeti. ( )
  wetdryvac | Mar 2, 2021 |
Once again, the artwork of this 62 page comic book (or graphic novel as they call them now) was superb! Tintin, his dog Snowy and his friend the Captain (from "The Crab with the Golden Claws", vol. 9 in the series) set off to find Tintin's friend Chang whom everyone except Tintin believes is dead as a result of a plane crash in the mountains of Tibet. I found this one less out and out funny but loved the story. ( )
  leslie.98 | Sep 22, 2019 |
Un peu ridicule dans sa croyance ingénue d’un Buddhism qui n’existe pas. ( )
  leandrod | Oct 4, 2017 |
Tintín en el Tibet (Tintin au Tibet) es un álbum de aventuras de Tintín, escrito e ilustrado por el historietista belga Hergé. Se publicó en francés en 1960.

Tintín en el Tibet es el vigésimo libro de la serie Las aventuras de Tintín. Se ha dicho que fue el álbum favorito de Hergé (previamente lo fue El secreto del Unicornio), y fue escrito durante un período difícil de su vida, cuando se estaba divorciando de su primera esposa. La historia es diferente a la de los otros libros de Tintín, de antes o de después: no hay enemigos y solo un pequeño número de personajes. La historia es también inusualmente emotiva para Tintín: momentos de mucha emoción como la obstinada creencia de Tintín en la supervivencia de Chang, el descubrimiento del osito de peluche en la nieve, el Capitán Haddock sacrificándose para salvar a Tintín, el regreso de Tharkey, el encuentro con Chang, y como el yeti pierde su único amigo. Podemos ver a Tintín llorando al imaginar el destino de Chang, algo que solo se hace en dos ocasiones a lo largo de toda la serie (la otra es El Loto Azul).

Todo comienza en un imaginario centro turístico en Vargèse (Saboya) junto al Capitán Haddock, Tintín lee sobre un accidente aéreo en las montañas del Himalaya. Esa misma tarde en el hotel, Tintín se duerme un poco mientras juega al ajedrez con el Capitán, a quien le está costando decidir su próximo movimiento. Tintin tiene un sueño muy real sobre su amigo Chino Chang Chong-Chen (visto en El Loto Azul) despertando en medio de un aeroplano en llamas y en este momento despierta violentamente, gritando "¡Chang!" y tirando todo lo que hay en la mesa. A la mañana siguiente, lee en el periódico que Chang se encontraba en el avión siniestrado en Tíbet. Creyendo firmemennte que el sueño era una visión cierta, Tintín viaja a Katmandú, seguido por un más que escéptico Capitán Haddock. Allí contratan a un sherpa llamado Tharkey, y acompañados por varios porteadores, se dirigen al lugar del impacto.

Tras una serie de acontecimientos, descubre grandes huellas en la nieve y Tharkey afirma que pertenecen al yeti. Los porteadores abandonan al grupo, y Tintín, Haddock y Tharkey siguen, tomando la carga que pueden. Finalmente consiguen llegar al lugar de la colisión, donde Tintín encuentra un osito de peluche semienterrado en la nieve, el cual parece ser pertenencia de Chang. Tintín se interna en la nieve tratando de seguir los pasos de Chang, y encuentra una cueva donde Chang talló su nombre en la roca. Seguidamente se produce una tormenta y Tintín cae en una hendidura en la tierra, se reincorpora a Haddock y Tharkey, quienes se habían abrigado en el avión siniestrado.

Tharkey decide no seguir más adelante, afirmando que Chang estaba muerto, y Tintín, Milú y Haddock prosiguen cuando Tintín ve una bufanda en la ladera de una montaña. Haddock pierde su agarre y se balancea peligrosamente sobre el abismo. Quiere que Tintín corte la cuerda que les une y pueda salvarse, pero Tintín rechaza la idea, diciendo que o se salvan ambos o mueren juntos. Tharkey, movido por el desinterés de Tintín, vuelve justo a tiempo para salvarlos. Montan una tienda en la cima, pero el fuerte viento se la lleva, hasta la cara del yeti. Deciden caminar toda la noche, y finalmente ven el monasterio de Khor-Biyong. Se produce una avalancha, y los tres son enterrados por la nieve.

Rayo Bendito, un monje del monasterio, 've' a Tintín, Milú, Haddock y Tharkey en la nieve, en una visión. Arriba en las montañas, Tintín recupera la conciencia, e incapaz de llegar hasta el monasterio, escribe una nota y manda a Milú para que la entregue. Milú marcha al monasterio pero se entretiene y pierde la nota. Por fin Milú consigue que los monjes le sigan.

El capitán Haddock despierta en el monasterio. Allí encuentra a Tintín y Tharkey de nuevo. Después Tintín le cuenta al Gran Abad porqué están allí, y éste les recomienda abandorar la búsqueda y volver a su país. Rayo Bendito tien otra visión, a través de la cual Tintín concluye que Chang sigue vivo, en una cueva, pero el "migou" (el yeti) le retiene. Haddock no cree en la visión, pero el abad le explica que mucho de lo que ocurre en Tíbet parece imposible a los occidentales. Tintin se dirige a Charabang, un pueblo en las montañas cercano a donde Rayo Bendito dijo que se encontraba Chang. Haddock al principio rechaza seguir a Tintín, pero acaba yendo a Charabang y ambos, con Milú, escalan hasta el "Cuerno del Yak" - el sitio donde el monje vio a Chang.

Esperan hasta que el yeti abandona la cueva. Tintín entra con una cámara, ya que el Capitán le había ordenado tomar una fotografía al yeti si podía. Dentro de la cueva, Tintín encuentra al fin a Chang, quien está temblando y con fiebres. Haddock no consigue avisar a Tintín del regreso del yeti, y este se adentra en la cueva, Tintín nervioso dispara accidentalmente el flash de la cámara. El yeti, asustado por la potente luz, sale corriendo de la cueva, embistiendo al Capitán, quien estaba entrando en la cueva. Llevan en camilla a Chang, éste les cuenta la historia de su supervivencia, y de como el yeti le cuidó. Chang lo llama yeti "Pobre Hombre de las Nieves", y a Tintín le asombra que no dijera "abominable". "Por supuesto que no," dice Chang, "él me cuidó. Sin él hubiera muerto de frío y hambre." Se encuentran de nuevo con el Gran abad y un comité de monjes, que regalan a Tintin una bufanda de seda en honor al coraje demostrado, y la fortaleza de su amistad con Chang. Son hospedados de nuevo en el monasterio, y tras una semana, cuando Chang se recupera, vuelven a Nepal a caballo. Chang medita sobre que el yeti no es un animal salvaje, sino que tiene un alma humana.
  Belarmino | Dec 25, 2015 |
Visa 1-5 av 14 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

» Lägg till fler författare (9 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
HergéFörfattareprimär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Boore, RogerÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Janzon, Allan B.Översättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Janzon, KarinÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Jones, DafyddÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Lonsdale-Cooper, LeslieÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Turner, MichaelÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Turner, MichaelÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Zendrera, ConcepciónÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Information från den walesiska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
What a glorious holiday, eh, Snowy?
Citat
Avslutande ord
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Särskiljningsnotis
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
comic book
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Kanonisk DDC/MDS
Kanonisk LCC

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Lagom till Tintins 75-årsjubileum förra året började förlaget ge ut samtliga delar i kronologisk ordning, i ny svensk översättning av en Tintinexpert. I år fortsätter böckerna komma ut. "Tintin i Tibet" räknas av många som Hergés mest personliga album. Tintin, Milou och kapten Haddock betvingar Tibets iskalla bergstoppar för att leta efter Tintins goda vän Tchang Tchong-Jen, som tros ha dött i en flygplanskrasch. I bergen lurar också andra faror. [Barnbokskatalogen]

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Populära omslag

Snabblänkar

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (4.13)
0.5
1
1.5 2
2 8
2.5 7
3 57
3.5 15
4 125
4.5 14
5 136

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 163,223,576 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig